We've received royal recognition for our neuroscience research

Yesterday (21 November 2019) at St James’s Palace, our Sheffield Institute for Translational Neuroscience (SITraN) was awarded a Queen’s Anniversary Prize. This prize is the highest national honour that recognises outstanding work by UK universities and colleges that demonstrate quality and innovation in their research.

Professor Gill Valentine, Provost and Deputy Vice-Chancellor, expresses her thanks for this important achievement and explains why we are considered a world-leader in neuroscience research.

Dear colleague

Today we are celebrating the exciting news that we have received a Queen's Anniversary Prize for innovation in neuroscience.

Last night at St James’s Palace, our Sheffield Institute for Translational Neuroscience (SITraN) was awarded the prize, the highest national honour that recognises outstanding work by UK universities and colleges demonstrating quality and innovation in their research.

This prize recognises our University as a centre for excellence in neuroscience research and teaching, which has the power to transform people’s lives.

Our talented research teams are making life-changing discoveries and enormous scientific progress in treating some of the most devastating neurological diseases.

They are also nurturing the next generation of talented students, whose research will lead to pioneering treatments for those living with neurological diseases in the future.

This award will help inspire patients and their families, research partners and donors as we continue to make discoveries that deepen the understanding of neurological diseases and open up the potential for new treatments and therapies.

SITraN will celebrate its 10th anniversary in 2020 and is considered a world-leader in neuroscience research. Its work forms part of the Neuroscience Institute, one of our new flagship institutes.

I would like to thank Professor Dame Pamela Shaw, Director of SITraN and the Neuroscience Institute and all colleagues involved in neuroscience – thank you for all your important work and for bringing a seventh Queen’s Anniversary Prize back to the University.

Thank you

Professor Gill Valentine
Provost and Deputy Vice-Chancellor

Achievements highlighted by the award include:

  • a new orthotic device, ‘HeadUp’, for patients living with MND who suffer from muscle weakness in their neck
  • ground-breaking clinical stem cell clinical trials for MS patients
  • research which has improved the life-expectancy and quality of life for those living with MND
  • the discovery of a biomarker linked to the development of Alzheimer’s Disease for the first time, which has the potential for earlier diagnosis and has sparked the development of new therapies
  • drug discovery programmes to develop new treatments for Parkinson’s Disease
  • new gene therapy experimental medicine studies for MND which are showing promising early results

Neuroscientist

Dame Pamela Shaw

Neuroscientists