MODULE DESCRIPTION 2017-18

AUTUMN SEMESTER

15 CREDITS

AAP6068 GREEKS, ROMANS AND ‘OTHERS’ IN THE ANCIENT WORLD
CO-ORDINATOR: MAUREEN CARROLL
OTHER TUTORS: JANE REMPEL

MODULE OUTLINE

Investigates European societies from the beginning of Greek colonisation in the 8th century BC through the rise and fall of the Roman empire, drawing on material from the Mediterranean, the Black Sea and central and northern Europe, and looks at the ways in which these societies were transformed. This module consists of two elements:

  • A series of 1-hour lectures that: explore the role of colonisation and the implications of cultural interaction; investigate the relationships between peripheries and frontiers; analyse the family in society and the implications of social mobility; and discuss the role of the past in the past.
  • A series of seminars and problem-solving tutorials that will consider such topics as material culture and cultural interaction; gendered space; the construction and expression of identities; and trade and exchange. Students are given the opportunity also to examine some of the material remains of the Greek and Roman worlds.

BROAD ACADEMIC AIMS AND PRINCIPLES OF THE UNIT

This unit aims to:

  • Introduce students to the range of methods and theoretical approaches applied in Greek and Roman archaeology;
  • Evaluate different types of archaeological and historical evidence;
  • Investigate a variety of sites in the Mediterranean and Europe and their archaeological exploration;
  • Explore a range of themes related to Greek and Rome colonisation and contact with the rest of the ancient world;
  • Explore the culture of empires;
  • Investigate the economic and cultural interaction of Greece and Rome with its near and distant neighbours;
  • Analyse the ways in which identities were negotiated and expressed in the Graeco-Roman world.

MEASUREABLE LEARNING OUTCOMES

By the end of this module students should demonstrate an understanding of:

  • an understanding of the methodological and theoretical approaches to Greek and Roman archaeology, and the relation of this area of study to the broader discipline of historical archaeology;
  • a detailed knowledge of the archaeology of the sites and monuments of the Graeco-Roman world, as exemplified in a wide range of case studies;
  • an ability to assess primary data of different types, based on an understanding of formation processes and cultural practices as well as the limitations of archaeological evidence;
  • an ability to analyse and reflect critically upon a range of interpretations of archaeological and historical evidence;
  • an understanding and a critical awareness of the factors contributing to the emergence of powerful political systems in the Graeco-Roman world.

EXAMPLES OF LECTURE/SEMINAR TITLES

Our lectures/seminars are highly participative and taught by leaders in their field.

  • Greece, the Mediterranean and the Black Sea: topography and chronology
  • Topography, cultures and peoples: Italy and beyond
  • The archaeology of Greek colonisation
  • Colonisation, Exchange and Interaction in the Roman World
  • Greek Dress and Identity
  • Local, region and 'global' margins of the oikoumene
  • Demeter, Athens and the Wider Greek World
  • Gender in the Etruscan World
  • Mounded Burials on the edges of the Greek and Roman Worlds

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT SKILLS ACQUIRED

Ability to critically evaluate archaeological and historical evidence and theoretical interpretations;ability to critically synthesise published information; participating in group discussion and presentation skills.


STUDENT ATTENDANCE AND INDEPENDENT STUDY

Type

Hours

Lectures 8
Seminars 6
Independent Study (including preparation for assessments) 136

ASSESSMENT

Method

% of marks

Hours/Length

Student seminar presentation 70% 2500
Essay(s)/Coursework 30% 1000