Research Supervisor Details

This page provides additional information about our research supervisors. You can either browser supervisors by department or search for them by keyword. Most supervisors also have a personal webpage where you can find out more about them.

Find by:
Please select the department to view:

Dr Adam Brown
adam.brown@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Dr Solomon Brown
S.F.Brown@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Dr Kyra Campbell
k.sedransk@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Professor Serena Corr
s.corr@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Department of Materials Science and Engineering

Energy storage research:

Moving towards a more electrified world presents considerable energy storage challenges. Amongst these, the development of low cost, durable, high energy density, safe batteries is paramount for delivery of an all-electric vehicle market. A major theme of our research is to develop novel, facile routes to functional materials using our expertise in solid state and wet chemical methods to provide new battery electrodes and electrolytes across a range of chemistries. We apply a comprehensive range of lab- and synchrotron-based techniques to fully interrogate these materials to elucidate their structure and morphology, investigate their physical and dynamic properties and evaluate their electrochemical performance. Specific research projects include:

High nickel-content electrodes for Li-ion batteries: The benefits of moving to high nickel-content electrodes include potentially higher energy densities and reducing the cobalt content, which addresses the ethical implications and cost associated with this metal. Our group work on the synthesis of micron and nanosized NMC variants. Together with our collaborators in the Faraday Institution Degradation project, we investigate degradation mechanisms in these materials through a holistic approach and design methodologies to mitigate those deleterious effects.

Next generation cathode materials for Li-ion batteries: We are interested in new electrode architectures that enhance long-term performance and durability. Our group has experience in core-shell structures, faceted particles and composite materials. We are developing new synthetic strategies for garnering control over particle morphology to interrogate the effect this has on battery performance. We investigate higher nickel content cathodes, disordered materials, polyanionic and high Li content cathodes, in addition to coating strategies for electrode particles.

New materials for safer all solid-state batteries: Current batteries rely on flammable organic electrolytes that are potentially hazardous and limit performance. Research in the Corr group is ongoing to develop new solid ceramic electrolytes which present more stable alternatives and display high ionic conductivities. Classes of materials we currently study include perovskites, garnets, NASICONS and agyrodites.

Developing microwave approaches to battery materials: Post-processing of novel metallorganic precursors can afford nanostructured materials. By careful design, nanoparticles with specific properties may be tailored. This opens up a ‘bottom-up’ design approach to new materials. We are interested in new heterometallic precursors which afford the opportunity to tune stoichiometries and resulting particle shape.

Chemistries beyond Li-ion: Magnesium-ion batteries represent a potentially transformative approach to current electrochemical energy storage technologies yet their translation to market remains hindered due to a lack of appropriate candidate cathode materials. Our group is developing new Mg-ion cathode materials, in combination with new electrolyte systems.

Materials for Conservation

Working with collaborators at the Mary Rose Trust, we are designing a new approach to the conservation of Mary Rose artefacts, going beyond current methods where potential acid sources remain in the wood through the use of smart multifunctional magnetic nanocomposites. These target and remove harmful entities lodged inside wooden structures. We can direct magnetic nanoparticles to desired areas inside the wood, optimising the removal of harmful species. We use state-of-the-art synchrotron tools to evaluate the structure and speciation of species found within these priceless artefacts.

Dr Denis Cumming
d.cumming@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Dr Eddie Cussen
e.j.cussen@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Professor Mark Dickman
m.dickman@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Research interests
  • Biological mass spectrometry
  • Bioseparations
  • Post-translational and post-transcriptional modifications
  • Proteomics
  • CRISPR systems
Dr Alan Dunbar
a.dunbar@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Research interests
  • Polymer Based Solar Cells
  • Experimental techniques to characterise nano-scale phase separation in polymers
  • Thin film toxic gas sensors
  • Electrical properties of nano-structured systems
Dr Stephen Ebbens
s.ebbens@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Research interests
  • Nanoswimming Devices
  • Polymers
  • Microscopy
  • Surface Analysis and Modification
Dr Caroline Evans


Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
School of Clinical Dentistry
Dr Robert Falconer
r.j.falconer@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Research interests
  • Protein stability and formulation
  • Interaction between proteins, water and small molecules
  • Spectroscopy technology especially Terahertz time domain and far-infrared spectroscopy
  • Micro-calorimetry
  • Beverage manufacturing
Dr Mark Heslop
m.j.heslop@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Research interests
  • Measurement of adsorption
  • Measurement of small changes in flow rate
  • Development of detectors for detection of flow rate and composition
Dr Jonathan Howse
j.r.howse@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Research interests
  • Nanoswimmers
  • Understanding Spin-Coating
  • Polymer Vesicle Formation
  • Phase separation in polymer blends
Professor David James
d.c.james@sheffield
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

Research interests

  • Production of high-value therapeutic recombinant protein biopharmaceuticals
  • Systems Biotechnology for Rational Bioprocess Engineering
  • Cell Factory and Gene Vector Engineering
  • Process Analytical TechnologyCPE412 – Molecular Biotechnology
Dr Henriette Jensen
h.s.jensen@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

Research interests

  • Sewer process modelling
  • Hydrogen sulphide induced corrosion
  • Microbial ecology in urban water systems
  • Synthetic biology
  • Odour problems


Dr Esther Karunakaran
e.karunakaran@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Professor Jim Litster


Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Dr Jordan MacInnes
j.m.macinnes@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Research interests
  • Microfluidic devices for analysis, synthesis and measurement
  • Efficient separation processes
  • Transport of momentum, species and heat
  • Rotating spiral phase contacting
  • Rapid property measurement and analysis
Dr James McGregor
james.mcgregor@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

Our research is concerned with sustainable catalytic engineering. Key areas of current focus include:

- the application of waste or low-value co-products in catalysis. For example current projects are examining carbon dioxide as a chemical feedstock; the valorisation of glycerol; the use of food and agricultural waste (e.g. brewers spent grain) as a raw material; and biochar derived carbons as active catalytic materials

- petrochemical processing. Dehydrogenation, alylation, cracking and methanol-to-hydrocrabon reactions are all currently being investigated in my research group.

- catalyst deactivation and activation through coking. Coke deposition is ubiquitous in catalysis and is normally assocaited with deactivation. However in some cases coke can enhance catalytic performance and we are seeking to understand and exploit this phenomenon. 

- innovative characterisation techniques. We work with colleagues to apply novel techniques to the field of catalysis, e.g. optical tweezers.

Dr Peyman Moghadam
p.moghadam@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

Interests concern the study of the molecular mechanisms that control adsorption processes in porous materials and the design of new porous systems based on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs).

Dr Alisyn Nedoma
a.nedoma@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Dr Mark Ogden
m.d.ogden@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

Research interests

Fundamentally the research of the Separations and Nuclear Chemical Engineering Research (SNUCER) group in CBE is focused on the fundamental interaction of species at an interface that promote a preferential partitioning of the species of interest. This research can be applied to the research fields below;

  • Spent nuclear fuel reprocessing
  • Solvent extraction and ion exchange
  • Solid phase extraction
  • Novel separation processes
  • Ionic liquids in separation processes
  • Supercritical fluids in separation processes
  • Actinide speciation
  • Precious metals recovery
  • Metal removal and waste processing
  • Waste metal recycling
  • Water treatment
  • Environmental remediation

The research that we carry out is the selective recovery of targeted metal ions from waste matrices. These wastes can be from a multitude of energy producing as well as manufacturing industries with the inclusion of legacy waste sites and abandoned mines. The work we do cross cuts not only the energy sector but environmental sustainability regarding resources and water quality. 

Dr Jags Pandhal
j.pandhal@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Research interests
  • Environmental proteomics
  • Metaproteomics
  • Metabolic Engineering
  • Ecological Engineering (synthetic ecology)
  • Biomanufacturing
  • Ecosystems Services (industrial ecology)
  • Algae
  • Glycosylation
  • E. coli
Professor Siddharth Patwardhan
s.patwardhan@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

Picture

Research in the group undertakes the synthesis of bespoke nanomaterials using biologically inspired green routes.

The group aims to demonstrate potential of green methods for nanomaterials synthesis by realisation of their real-life applications.  Current projects in his group are focussed on developing application of     green nanomaterials in four distinct sectors:   


Technologies allowing scaled-up continuous manufacturing of these novel materials are also being developed.

Focus is on increasing technology readiness level (TRL) for new developments and delivering technologies that are ready for commercialisation.

Dr Rachael Rothman
r.elder@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Research interests
  • Thermochemical and Electrochemical Cycles
  • Hydrogen production
  • Carbon dioxide utilisation
  • Membrane Separations
  • Whole system analysis
Professor Agba Salman
a.d.salman@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

Research interests

My research interests are diverse within this constantly growing area, ranging from mechanisms of granulation to particle breakage and particle–wall interaction studies. My research centres mainly on understanding mechanisms in granule formation, use and break up. The overall aim is to apply a scientific understanding of the process at different length scales to improve the final granule quality, hence enabling new, novel industrial applications and improvements in mechanical granule properties.

Dr Rachel Smith
rachel.smith@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Research interests
  • Wet granulation design and scale-up
  • DEM/CFD modelling of particulate processes
  • Drug delivery methods
  • Biological and water systems modelling
Professor Peter Styring
p.styring@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Research interests
  • New materials for carbon dioxide capture
  • Catalysts for carbon dioxide utilisation (CDU)
  • Absorber and reactor intensification for CDU
  • Process design for energy and economically efficient CDU
  • Life Cycle Assessment in CDU
  • CDU Policy and Public Engagement
  • Snowsports Tribology
Professor Annette Taylor
a.f.taylor@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
  • Biotechnology and biosystems
  • Catalysis and biocatalysis
  • Modelling
  • Reaction Engineering
  • Sustainability
Dr Kang Lan Tee
k.tee@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Dr Seetharaman Vaidyanathan
s.vaidyanathan@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Research interests
  • Bioanalytical technologies
  • Metabolomics
  • Mass spectrometry imaging
  • Bio-energy
  • Microbial biotechnology
Dr Sergio Vernuccio
s.vernuccio@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Dr Brant Walkley
b.walkley@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Professor Meihong Wang
meihong.wang@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

Expertise:

Research areas:   Process and Energy Systems Engineering

Technical tools:    Process Modeling/Simulation, Control and Optimization (with new efforts in Molecular simulation)

Application areas:   Power Plants, CO2 Capture, CO2 Transport, CO2 Utilisation, Energy Storage, Bio-Energy

 

Research Funding and Projects:

Since 2007, I am involved in projects worth around £12.9 million [7 grants as PIs (worth £2.1 million) and 10 grants as CIs (worth £10.8 million)], with net research funding around £2,597 k spent by my own group.

I am leading one UK EPSRC funded Consortium project on intensified carbon capture worth £1.27 million with 10 investigators and 5 PDRFs from 4 universities from Oct. 2014 to Mar. 2018.

I am Project Coordinator of EU IRSES project, leading 6 EU/China partners (with 40 research staff) from Jan. 2014 to Dec. 2017 using process systems engineering techniques for power plants and CCS.

 

Impact

One journal paper (Lazic et al., 2013) is awarded SAGE Best Paper Prize 2014 (http://hulluniscience.com/2015/05/20/chemical-engineering-professor-receives-sage-best-paper-award/) & also Ludwig Mond Prize 2014 by IMechE to recognize our contributions to process industry (http://hulluniscience.com/2015/08/21/humber-co2-transport-pipeline-network-design-wins-top-award/)

Another journal paper (Wang et al. 2011) is the most cited paper in Chem. Eng. Res. and Des. since 2010 (http://www.journals.elsevier.com/chemical-engineering-research-and-design/most-cited-articles/).

In collaboration with RWE npower, Alstom Power, BF2RA, COSTAIN, National Grid, PSE Ltd, Carbon Clean Solutions (CCS) Ltd, E.ON UK and Solutia UK for research.

Dr Tuck Seng Wong
t.wong@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

Research interests

  • Protein engineering (directed evolution)
  • Biocatalysis and industrial biotechnology
  • Synthetic biology
  • Biological carbon dioxide capture and utilization
  • Biophysics
  • Cancer and ageing


Dr Yajue Wu
y.wu@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Research interests
  • Hydrogen energy systems.
  • Fast fire spread phenomena in buildings and underground structures and tunnel fires
  • Dynamics of fires and explosions
  • Combustion and heat transfer in industrial furnaces
  • Hazard analysis and risk assessment of process industry
Professor Mohammad Zandi
m.zandi@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Research interests
  • Environmental Engineering & Monitoring
  • Energy Engineering
  • Alternative fuels, biomass and biofuels
  • CO2 Sequestration Technologies
Dr Xiubo Zhao
Xiubo.zhao@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

We use highly interdisciplinary approaches that integrate the concepts and expertise from chemistry, physics, biomaterials, microbiology and cell biology to develop materials and devices for biomedical applications. More details can be found here.

Research interests

  • Bioprinting: Reactive inkjet printing of silk scaffolds for tissue engineering.
  • Printed devices: Reactive inkjet printing of biosensors and analytical devices such as enzyme powered silk swimming devices & micro-well arrays for cancer diagnostics.
  • Nanotechnology: Peptide self-assembly into different nanostructures.
  • Biomaterials: Natural and synthetic materials for biomedical applications.
  • Nanomedcine: Nanoparticles, antimicrobial / anticancer peptides for gene and drug delivery.
  • Bio-interfaces: Adsorption of natural and de novo designed biosurfactants and their interaction with conventional surfactants at interfaces. Surface adsorption/functionalization of biomolecules (such as antibodies, peptides, proteins, polymers) for biocompatible surfaces, antimicrobial surfaces.
  • Biosensors: Biomarker immobilization and detection for biosensor applications
Professor William Zimmerman
w.zimmerman@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Research interests
  • Energy efficient generation of microbubbles and their applications (particularly biofuels and bioreactors)
  • Plasma microreactors, especially low power consumption generation of ozone
  • Fluid dynamics of helical turbulence and mixing
  • Thin film dynamics and microrheometry
  • Computational modelling with inverse methods