Research Supervisor Details

This page provides additional information about our research supervisors. You can either browser supervisors by department or search for them by keyword. Most supervisors also have a personal webpage where you can find out more about them.

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Dr Ansgar Allen
a.allen@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Ansgar welcomes applications to study for doctoral research degrees, in particular from those wishing to undertake research in the areas of educational philosophy, history and theory.

Professor Tom Billington
t.billington@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Tom is an educational and child psychologist, researcher and teacher.  Tom’s interests focus on young people’s emotional well being and mental health, specifically critical approaches to child development including attachment, autism, child safeguarding and neuroscience in education.  Tom has supervised to completion over 60 personal Doctoral students in Psychology and Education, UK and international.

Dr Jessica Bradley
jessica.bradley@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Jessica is an ethnographer, with research interests in language and creative practice in formal and non-formal education. Her AHRC-funded doctoral research was carried out in the School of Education at the University of Leeds, as part of the TLANG project: ‘Translation and Translanguaging: Investigating Linguistic and Cultural Transformations in Superdiverse Wards in Four UK Cities’. Her research (e.g. Bradley & Moore, 2018) in the UK and Slovenia explores dynamic communication in the context of community arts and, specifically, street arts. Her PhD investigated how street artists work together to create productions and perform. Although applied linguistics-based, her research is interdisciplinary and her thesis took her in different directions, including towards folklore and story-telling. She focused on the sociolinguistic concept of translanguaging, applying it to street arts production and performance and her interests lay in how it could be extended and expanded to incorporate multiple, intersecting modalities. Her findings relate to notions of trans-semiotisation and how scripted emergence is enabled by creative practitioners working together to co-create art. She suggests that there is potential for translanguaging to be understood through posthuman approaches to applied linguistics and that there is scope for rethinking communicative practices through expanded notions of interaction, shifting towards intra-action. This has opened up her original research to new interpretations which she continues to develop.

At Leeds she developed and co-led a series of arts-based projects. These include the AHRC-funded ‘Migration and Home: Welcome in Utopia’ project which used multimodal and arts-informed approaches to understandings of ‘welcome’. This was part of the Connected Communities Utopias 2016 Festival (e.g. McKay & Bradley, 2016) and led to the ESRC-funded ‘Migration and Settlement: Extending the welcome’ (Leeds Social Science Institute) which investigated arts-informed practice and adult migrant language education. Both projects have developed into research around ‘Belonging’, at the intersection of applied linguistics and creative inquiry.

Dr Harriet Cameron
h.cameron@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Harriet is interested in the discourses of learning, learning difference and learning identity. She is particularly interested in the way language around learning disabilities and differences comes to shape the way diagnoses of autism, (specific) learning disability, ADHD and mental ill-health are constructed in specific places, spaces and times. Harriet is also interested in the lived experiences of people who come to be categorised as ‘deficient’ in learning or communicating, and in how systems, processes, and policies interact with these experiences, both in ‘western’ contexts and in the global South.

Dr Liz Chesworth
e.a.chesworth@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Liz supervises doctoral students in the areas of:

Critical curriculum studies in early childhood education
Young children’s funds of knowledge
Critical perspectives of play in early childhood
Young children’s peer cultures
Critical sociocultural theory in early childhood education
Inclusive education for young children
Multimodality in early childhood
Posthuman theory in early childhood

Dr Heather Clarkson
h.l.ellis@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Heather is interested in supervising research students looking to work in the history of knowledge, intellectual history and the history of higher education

Dr Nadena Doharty
n.doharty@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Nadena's areas of research include Sociology of Education, Black History, inequalities in education, racialised identities in schooling, Critical Race Theories, and critical/anti-racist pedagogies.


Dr Katherine Easton
l.a.easton@sheffield.ac.uk

School of Education
Professor Daniel Goodley
d.goodley@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Dan supervises doctoral students in the areas of:


Critical disability studies;
Qualitative research including ethnography, narrative inquiry, discourse analysis, Inclusive education;
Queer, Feminist, Postcolonial and Crip studies, Critical Psychology, Sociology of Education, Sociology of the Body, Sociology of Emotions/Affect;
Posthuman and DisHuman studies.

Dr Caroline Hart
c.hart@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Caroline Hart has a range of active research interests related to the roles of education and health in human development. She is an inter-disciplinary researcher and her conceptual work has been principally concerned with notions of aspiration, capabilities, well-being and social justice.

Dr Tim Herrick
t.herrick@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Tim's research interests cross-pollinate with his teaching, and are concerned with several of the same areas. For example, Tim is exploring the philosophical grounds on which civic universities should play an active role in working with members of migrant communities to enhance their access to higher learning. Tim's (many and varied) classroom experiences have led him to research the emotional aspects of learning and teaching, with a particular interest in theories and practices grounded in psychotherapies. Tim is interested in the history of radical pedagogies, especially the crop of ideas from the late 1960s and early 1970s about alternatives to compulsory schooling.  Tim has a particular engagement with the ideas of Paulo Freire, and a commitment to broader-based notions of education for democracy.

Dr David Hyatt
d.hyatt@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

David's research interests have a focus on pedagogy, particularly in a higher education context. As a result, his research currently centres around two major interlinked research areas of interest:

  • Higher Education Policy and Pedagogies
  • The Impact of Language on Educational Processes.
Dr Louise Kay

Personal Webpage

School of Education

Louise supervises doctoral students in the areas of:

Curricular and assessment policy frameworks
School readiness
Early Childhood Education
Cultural-Historical Activity Theory
Socio-cultural theory in Early Childhood Education

Dr Kirsty Liddiard
k.liddiard@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Kirsty welcomes PhD students across a number of social science disciplines that wish to undertake research in the areas of disability, education, gender, sexuality and childhood and youth.

Dr Sabine Little
s.little@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Sabine has a number of research interests, which are multi-faceted and overlapping.  Sabine's main and over-arching research interest is in the field of heritage language learners and identity -  how families who speak multiple languages in the home navigate these languages, and what this means for individual family members' sense of identity and well-being. Language is an integral part of identity, but is a very personal experience, even within the same family, so my work focuses on helping families and policy-makers understand issues and pressures faced by heritage language families, and to develop holistic support opportunities.  Other aspects of Sabine's research looks at online learning and teacher professional development in international contexts.

Professor Jacqueline Marsh
j.a.marsh@Sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Jackie supervises students in the fields of early childhood education and new literacies.

Dr Andrew McLean


School of Education

Andy graduated in Physiology and Biochemistry with Chemistry. He maintains a passionate interest in the 'Great Outdoors' as a vehicle for the personal and professional development of both children and adults and he holds a number of National Governing Body instructor qualifications. He has taken part in scientific expeditions to Scotland, Norway, Ecuador and Nepal to study aspects of marine biology, human physiology and ecology.

Dr China Mills
china.mills@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

China's teaching philosophy is rooted in the respect of student diversity and the co-creation of knowledge within the learning environment. She has supported a diverse range of students, many of whom have English as an additional language, experience mental health issues, and/or have additional needs.

Dr Themesa Neckles
themesa.neckles@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Themesa is interested in using critical methodologies for inquiring into issues related to educational theory, policy and practice with focus on an emancipatory agenda for individuals’ lives, their work and the societies in which they live. She is also interested in engaging with theoretical issues around spirituality and education.

Dr Vassiliki Papatsiba
v.papatsiba@Sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Vassiliki researches issues about universities, research and higher education in a globalised context. She specialises in the sociological study of University, with emphasis on internationalisation issues, from a comparative, mainly European, perspective. She also has a keen interest in research policy and its implications for academic practice.

Dr Rebecca Parry
r.l.parry@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Becky’s research is focused on children’s media cultures in terms of what they play, read, watch and participate in and what they create and share. Becky is especially interested in developing pedagogies which support children’s creativity and criticality in relation to digital media. Her doctoral research focused particularly on children’s film and included the use of participatory and visual research methods.

Dr Mark Payne
mark.payne@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Mark's research interests have centred mainly on issues around second language acquisition, foreign language planning, the teaching and learning of languages and language classroom practices more generally. Since January 2013, Mark has been investigating the educational, linguistic and social integration of newly-arrived migrant pupils in local schools, particularly children from Slovak Roma backgrounds. Mark welcomes supervisions in the areas of: Second language acquisition and learning; language policy, pedagogy and practice; education and migration.

Dr Emma Pearson
emma.pearson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Informed by several key consultancies with international development partners, Emma’s research is oriented towards understanding the nature of and complexities associated with globalisation of early childhood policy and practice. This research is underpinned by a commitment to promoting the importance of ‘local’ values, beliefs and customs in supporting young children’s education and well-being.

Miss Lauren Powell


School of Education
Dr Andrey Rosowsky
a.rosowsky@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Andrey's research interests include language and education, sociolinguistics, multilingualism and faith-based complementary schooling. He has published in the fields of multilingualism, the sociology of language, the sociology of language and religion, language and education and language and identity. Much of his recent research is located within theoretical frameworks which view language as a social practice and language as performance. He recently led an AHRC-funded international research network on performance and faith: Heavenly Acts – aspects of performance through an interdisciplinary lens.

Professor Katherine Runswick-Cole
k.runswick-cole@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Katherine welcomes supervisions in the areas of: critical disability studies; special educational needs and/or disability and childhood.

Dr Jon Scaife
j.a.scaife@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Jon has particular interests in constructivism, learning and the nature of knowledge. This work underpins his research activities in the relationship between learning and teaching, in Interpersonal Process Recall, and in the construction of rich learning environments. He studied and taught Physics and Mathematics and now teaches mainly about learning. In the field of Science Education he has written on learning, on the use of ICT and on equity and equality.

Miss Fiona Scott
f.scott@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Fiona’s work is located in the field of digital literacies. Her research engages with sociomaterial theory to theorise very young children’s intra-actions with digital devices and texts. She is concerned with child and family practices in relation to the digital and, in particular, the role played by social class. Fiona is also interested in research methods and methodologies, including the tensions associated with researching children’s lives in more-than-human contexts. Fiona’s PhD thesis, produced in collaboration with CBeebies, examined preschool children’s engagements with television and related media at home.

Professor Pat Sikes
p.j.sikes@Sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Pat is interested in qualitative inquiry per se and especially in the use and development of ethical narrative auto/biographical sociological approaches to research, including life history and autoethnography. Her current research takes a narrative life history approach to investigate the perceptions and experiences of children and young people who have a parent with young onset dementia. Previous research has included a study of the perceptions and experiences of male secondary school teachers accused of sexual misconduct which they said they did not commit.

Dr Meesha Warmington
m.warmington@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

I am interested in supervising topics related to the area of executive control (i.e., attention, working memory and cognitive flexibility), language and literacy development in bilingual/monolingual children and adults. Specifically, I am keen to explore the following topics:

  • Cognitive-linguistic processing in monolingual and bilingual children and adults
  • Cognitive and neurological mechanisms underlying language learning
  • Errorless learning and performance feedback learning



Dr Darren Webb
d.webb@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Darren researches in the field of utopian studies and has become increasingly interested in the pedagogical practices of the ‘utopian’ educator. How does a committed utopist bring this commitment to bear on their role as an educator? Can there be such a thing as utopian pedagogy? Or a utopian pedagogue? Where and how can/should utopian pedagogy best operate?

Dr Anna Weighall

Personal Webpage

School of Education

 

Anna's research interests are broadly concerned with sleep, memory, language learning and cognitive development in neurotypical and neurodiverse populations (especially ADHD, neurofibromatosis, dyslexia and dysgraphia).  Anna applies an experimental approach to understanding factors that contribute to memory and learning, especially vocabulary learning in adults, children and those who speak English as an additional language (EAL). In addition, Anna is interested in the application of implementation science and behaviour change techniques to interventions to improve educational outcomes. She is interested in the link between physical health and cognitive performance and the extent to which the extent to which interventions to improve physical and mental health and wellbeing may also improve cognitive and educational outcomes for children, young people and their families.


Dr Antony Williams
Anthony.Williams@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Tony's research interests are focused in areas of critical psychology and psychoanalytic concepts and theory. To date his research has focused on contributing to the concept of a critical educational psychology. Related areas of interest include group dynamics, conceptions of mental health and emotional wellbeing, case study research and the use of reflexive and interpretative research methods.

Dr Christine Winter
c.winter@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Curriculum

Chris researches the language of curriculum texts (policies, textbooks, lesson plans, classroom resources and students' work) how it is interpreted and enacted in educational institutions. Chris investigates how educational ideas may be rethought, revitalised and enacted in a fair way. Chris is interested in the nature of knowledge, how it is produced, transformed and promoted through school subjects; the relationships between curriculum policies and curriculum practices and how curriculum influences the identity of students, parents/carers and teachers.

Education and Securitisation

Policies promoting British Values have been introduced recently into English schools. Chris investigates this curriculum reform in terms of the relationship between education, securitisation and militarisation, how such policies are enacted in practice and their influence on those concerned.

The School Curriculum

Chris is interested in school Humanities subject knowledge, particularly Geography. The rises and falls in Geography's status in the curriculum make it an exciting area of research in terms of the kind of knowledge that may or may not be made available to students.  Chris investigates how meaning about Geography arises and the process by which frameworks of meaning become institutionalised.  Chris is interested in developing new ways of knowing, learning and teaching school curriculum subjects, for example, through sculpture and fiction.

Globalisation

Globalisation is highly significant for educationalists at all levels. Chris' main interest lies in the relationship between globalisation and curriculum policy and practice.  Chris pays attention to debates around curriculum policy divergence, convergence and 'migration' related to globalisation. Chris is interested in how national identity is conceptualised in school texts and policies during contemporary globalised times.

Professor Elizabeth Wood
e.a.wood@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Liz's research focuses mainly on early childhood and primary education, with specific interests in play and pedagogy; curriculum and assessment in ECE; teachers’ professionalism and professional knowledge; policy analysis and critique.