Daniel GrayPhoto of Daniel Gray

Lecturer in Economics

Room 536
9 Mappin Street,
S1 4DT

Tel: +44 (0)114 222 9653
Fax +44 (0)114 222 3458

Email: d.j.gray@sheffield.ac.uk

Biography

Daniel graduated from the University of Sheffield in 2009 with a BSc in Economics and Mathematics and then went on to obtain an MSc Economics in 2010, also from the University of Sheffield. He completed his PhD in 2014, again at Sheffield, where his thesis explored the relationship between household finances and individual well-being by analysing a variety of nationally representative household surveys. After completing his PhD, Daniel worked as a Research Assistant at the Institute for Economic Analysis of Decision-making (InstEAD) and he was appointed as a Lecturer at the University of Sheffield in 2016.

Teaching

“I currently teach Applied Microeconomics to second year undergraduates and Public Policy Evaluation to postgraduate students. Applied Microeconomics aims to show how economic theory can be applied to understand a range of economic problems, whilst, Public Policy Evaluation aims to provide students with an understanding of economic models used to evaluate policy interventions. In both of these modules there will be an emphasis on applications to real world problems.”

Research Interests

Daniel’s research interests include the area of subjective well-being with a particular focus on the role of the household’s financial position. In addition, he is currently interested in household financial portfolio allocation and the effects of education on financial decision making.

More generally he is interested in applied microeconometrics and, in future, he would like to further explore these areas in addition to developing new research interests.

Daniel is looking to supervise PhD students in the area of household finances and applied microeconometrics.

Recent Research

Gray, D. (2014). Financial Concerns and Overall Life Satisfaction: A Joint Modelling Approach, SERPS no. 2014008.

S. Brown and D. Gray (2014). Household Finances and Well-Being: An Empirical Analysis of Comparison Effects, SERPS no. 2014015.