MSc Science Communication

Faculty of Science, Faculty of Medicine Dentistry and Health, and Faculty of Social Sciences

Learn how to communicate science to the public – from world-leading experts. You’ll explore the use of different platforms including social media.

Learn how to communicate science to the public – from world-leading experts. You’ll explore the use of different platforms including social media.

Marija Popova, MSc Science Communication

About the course

September 2016 start

Course description 2016

This course helps you develop the skills to communicate science effectively to a general audience.

We'll teach you about the latest topics in science and how to communicate these to the media and beyond.

A major part of your studies will be writing for the media and in our newsroom, you'll learn the principles of clear, compelling and concise storytelling.

We'll show you how the media works. You'll get practical experience, interacting with journalists, press officers and other media professionals.

You'll also work on a group project to plan, organise and deliver your own science exhibition.

There are lectures, tutorials and seminars. You'll also do project work, attend masterclasses and go on placements. Our students have worked on projects with partners in the creative industries, the NHS and the World Health Organisation.

You're assessed on coursework, essays, a portfolio, practical exercises and a dissertation.

Science Communication student

Core modules

The core modules for this course are being reviewed for 2016 entry. For the latest information, see our course modules page.

Teaching

Research in science and journalism informs our teaching and you'll have access to our purpose built Science Communication Lab - much of the practical work is done there and in the Department of Journalism Studies.

  • Lectures
  • Tutorials
  • Seminars
  • Project work
  • Masterclasses
  • Placements

Assessment

  • Coursework
  • Essays
  • Portfolio
  • Practical exercises
  • Dissertation

Course duration

  • 1 year full-time
  • 2 years part-time
September 2017 start

Course description 2017

The course helps you develop the skills to communicate science effectively to a general audience. We’ll teach you about the latest topics in science and how to communicate these to the media and beyond.

A major part of your studies will be writing for the media. In our newsroom, you’ll learn the principles of clear, compelling and concise storytelling. You’ll also work on a group project to plan, organise and deliver your own science exhibition.

Core modules

Science Communication student

  • Developing Communication Skills
  • Topical Science
  • Dissertation
  • Ethics and Regulation
  • Writing for the Media
  • Communicating with the Media
  • Online Journalism Studies
  • Research Methods

Teaching and assessment

Research in science and journalism informs our teaching. There are lectures, tutorials and seminars. You’ll also do project work, attend masterclasses and go on placements. You’re assessed on coursework, essays, a portfolio, practical exercises and a dissertation.

Course duration

  • 1 year full-time
  • 2 years part-time

Entry requirements

You'll need a 2:1 or equivalent in biology, chemistry, physics, psychology, mathematics, engineering or other science-related subject.

English Language Requirements

Overall IELTS grade of 7.0 with a minimum of 6.5 in each component, or equivalent.

Entry requirements for international students

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Professor Allan Pacey

I am a scientist working in the area of Reproductive Medicine and have published over 100 scientific papers. While I like writing papers and seeing them appear in print, they are only ever read by other scientists. So engaging with the public and exploring science with them is really important.

I have worked with journalists from most of the daily newspapers and regularly appear on news programmes such as the Six O’Clock News and The Today Programme. I have also helped make TV programmes, including ‘The Great Sperm Race’ (Channel 4), ‘The Truth About Food’ (BBC Two), and in 2011 a film for cinema ‘Donor Unknown’.

Professor Allan Pacey

Apply now

You can apply for postgraduate study using our Postgraduate Online Application Form. It is a quick and easy process.

Apply now

Any questions?

If you'd like to know more about any aspect of our courses, contact us:

Allan Pacey
E: sciencecommunication@sheffield.ac.uk
T: +44 (0)114 222 8290

The course information set out here may change before you begin, particularly if you are applying significantly in advance of the start date.