Research Supervisor Details

This page provides additional information about our research supervisors. You can either browser supervisors by department or search for them by keyword. Most supervisors also have a personal webpage where you can find out more about them.

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Dr David Andrew

Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry
Mr Simon Atkins

Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry
Professor Sarah Baker
s.r.baker@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Research interests

My principal research interest relates to the psychological and social factors which influence how people cope with chronic oral health conditions and their treatment. Such conditions include cleft lip and palate, oral cancer, orthognathic conditions, xerostomia, periodontal disease and edentulousness. This programme of work investigates the psychosocial factors which influence individual’s experiences of their oral health and the impact on well-being and quality of life. Understanding the role of such factors – sense of coherence, self esteem, social support networks, coping strategies, stress and resilience – allows us to explore potential mechanisms by which oral health impacts on individual’s daily lives and, in turn, develop intervention strategies that have the potential to improve health and well-being.

Other research interests include a critical examination of the conceptual foundations of oral health quality of life concepts, together with methodological and statistical approaches within the OHQoL field. Much of this research involves modelling the biopsychosocial determinants of oral health and well-being across the lifecourse using statistical techniques such as, structural equation modelling. 


Professor Philip Benson
p.benson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Research interests

My primary research interest is investigating the effectiveness of contemporary orthodontictechniques and practice. I am the principal or co-author on five systematic reviews published in the Cochrane Library and I have planned, coordinated and completed several randomised controlled clinical trials. I am also interested in oral health-related quality of life and in particular developing patient reported outcomes to measure the impact of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment on young peoples’ everyday lives.

Dr Lynne Bingle
l.bingle@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

My long-standing research interests have been focused on the role and regulation of epithelial secretory proteins. This work has principally involved the study of the airway epithelium, through the use of 3D in vitro model systems, but more recently has expanded to include the oral and nasal mucosa and the epithelium of the middle ear. My specific interests have focused on the fields of innate immunity, host defence and tumour biology.

I have also recently started to investigate the potential of using my tissue culture expertise to develop in vitro models of human salivary glands from fresh human tissue. We are now routinely isolating cells from human sublingual glands and are currently characterising cell phenotype under different culture conditions. The mid-term aim is to use these models to begin to elucidate the initial stages of salivary gland diseases such as Sjogren’s syndrome and salivary gland tumours.

Professor Fiona Boissonade
f.boissonade@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

I have a major research interest in the mechanisms of altered neuronal excitability that occur under the pathological conditions of nerve injury and inflammation, and which contribute to the development of chronic pain, including that in the oro–facial region. Much of this research has been done at the academic–industrial interface. Collaborations with GSK, Pfizer and Eli Lilly have funded a wide range of pre-clinical translational studies, using pre-clinical models and human tissues to identify and validate a range of regulators of neuronal excitability as potential targets for the development of novel analgesics and anti-inflammatory mediators.

Other research projects are directed towards improvement of nerve regeneration. This work investigates methods of improving nerve repair through the use of a range of anti-inflammatory and anti-scarring agents, and includes collaboration with the Department of Engineering Materials at the University of Sheffield to develop bioengineered conduits to enhance nerve regeneration. In other projects I collaborate with the Sheffield Institute for Translational Neuroscience (SITraN) investigating the role of chemokines in CNS disease.
I also have a significant research interest in neural–immune interactions and their role in the development of disease. I have a number of pilot projects underway in this field investigating neural interactions in the generation of cancer pain and tumour progression.

Dr Robert Bolt
r.bolt@sheffield.ac.uk

School of Clinical Dentistry
Dr Helen Colley
h.colley@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is the 6th most common cancers worldwide. The survival rate for head and neck cancer is poor. This is largely due to late diagnosis and a lack of effective therapeutic agents.


My particular research interest is in the development of multi-cellular three dimensional in vitro models of the oral mucosa in health and disease. My current research utilises these models to develop; new methods of detecting oral pre-cancer, novel drugs to treat oral cancer and new modes of drug delivery systems.

Dr Aileen Crawford
a.crawford@sheffield.ac.uk

School of Clinical Dentistry
Professor Christopher Deery
c.deery@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Research interests

  • Cariology
  • Preventive dentistry, particularly fissure sealants
  • Evidence based dentistry
  • Child-centred dental research

 

My areas of particular research interests are cariology, preventive dentistry, research in primary dental care, evidence based dentistry and child focused research.

Dr Claire Elcock
c.elcock@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Oral clinical phenotyping, involving the accurate measurement of oral parameters using image analysis.


Normal and abnormal oral growth and development, including investigations into anomalies of tooth number, size, form and structure.


Quantification of dental plaque and periodontal disease.


Child protection, children and young people's oral health, oral neuroscience.

Professor Barry Gibson
b.j.gibson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Research interests

The primary focus on my research has been the experience of oral health conditions and to this end I have been instrumental in securing funding from commercial bodies to explore the impact of dentine sensitivity on everyday life. This research conducted along with colleagues in the Unit of Dental Public Health has resulted in a new measure of the impact of dentine sensitivity.

I am also continuing to study the sociology of the mouth in everyday life by looking at the impact of oral conditions and the experience of the mouth in the media and everyday life. This work involves the use of systems theory, consumerism and the sociology of the body.

I maintain a healthy interest in grounded theory and to this end I continue to write on the method. I like to focus on blending it with other approaches such as systems theory and critical theory and at the same time I like to clarify the original version of grounded theory.

Professor Paul Hatton
paul.hatton@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Professor Hatton has interests in biomaterials, medical devices and tissue engineering for clinical applications in human skeletal tissues. The five major themes for his research are (1) the development of bioactive glasses and ceramics for mineralised tissue repair, (2) glass-ionomer bone cements, (3) In vitro evaluation of biocompatibility, and (4) Cartilage and bone tissue engineering on biomaterial scaffolds. He is also active more broadly in the promotion of academic-industrial collaboration and technology transfer in the orthopaedic, craniofacial and dental material sectors. See "Links" below for more details on this and the wider research of the Biomaterials Research Group.

Dr Stuart Hunt


School of Clinical Dentistry
Professor Keith Hunter
k.hunter@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

My main research interest is in the early events in oral carcinogenesis and keratinocyte senescence/immortalisation, particularly the genetic and epigenetic events associated with early invasion. I have ongoing projects investigating patterns of gene expression and genomic alteration in HNSCC, epigenetic control of gene expression and the roles of the inflammatory and angiogenic responses in early HNSCC.

My main clinical research interests are in the use of sentinel node biopsy in Head and Neck cancer and other clinical prognostic factors in Head and Neck cancer. I also have a particular interest in tooth pathology and odontogenic lesions/tumours.

Integrated Biosciences Research Group

Dr Ali Khurram
s.a.khurram@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

My main research interest is in the interaction of chemokine receptors and their ligands in the pathogenesis of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). During my Masters and PhD., I have studied the expression and role of various receptors including CXCR4 (receptor for CXCL12/SDF-1alpha), CXCR1 and CXCR2 (receptors for CXCL8/IL8) and XCR1 (receptor for XCL1/lymphotactin). My PhD findings showed the expression of the XCR1 receptor outside the immune system and on epithelial cells for the first time where it facilitated cancer cell signalling, migration, invasion, proliferation in addition to stimulating adhesion to ECM components and release of Matrix Metalloproteinases. I am also currently looking at the role of XCR1 and lymphotactin interaction in OSCC metastasis and involved in a study to design an antagonist for XCR1 in liaison with the Chemical Engineering department.
My main clinical research interest is studying extracapsular spread in OSCC as it reduces the 5-year patient survival by 80-85%. In addition, I have also been working on a number of collaborative projects for reducing postoperative salivary leakage in Head and Neck Cancer Resection patients. I am also involved with testing and optimisation of cancer treatment drugs and novel methods of delivery to reduce the associated side effects. In addition, I am also involved in numerous clinical audits/interventions with my surgical colleagues.

Professor Daniel Lambert
D.W.Lambert@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Molecular mechanisms underlying head and neck cancer progression

Head and neck cancer (HNSCC) ranks among the top ten most common cancers worldwide and is increasingly prevalent, particularly in younger age groups. The survival rate for this devastating disease is poor, largely due to late diagnosis and a lack of effective therapeutic agents. We are pursuing a number of research avenues which aim to identify diagnostic markers and prognostic indicators and to elucidate novel therapeutic targets to halt disease progression:

The role of microRNA in HNSCC
MicroRNA are small, non-coding, RNA which regulate the expression of target genes by binding to complementary sequences in their transcripts. Changes in the levels of a number of microRNA have been detected in a variety of cancers, including HNSCC. We are currently carrying out a number of projects studying the involvement of microRNA in the motility of HNSCC, with particular interest centring on their roles in modulating cell:extracellular matrix interactions and signalling pathway activity. In addition we are assessing the possibility of using specific microRNA as prognostic indicators in HNSCC progression. These studies complement work investigating microRNA involvement in prostate cancer and cardiovascular disease being carried out in collaboration with Prof Anthony J Turner at the University of Leeds.

The influence of microenvironment on tumour progression
It is becoming increasingly apparent that cancer cell behaviour is dictated, at least to some extent, by the surrounding microenvironment. HNSCC cells are surrounded in vivo by a stromal milieu, composed of fibroblasts, endothelial cell and immune cells. We are currently studying the mechanisms by which the cancer-associated stroma influences HNSCC progression.

Host-microbe interactions in periodontal disease

Chronic periodontitis, an inflammatory disease leading to tooth loss, affects over 300 million people worldwide and is a significant healthcare burden particularly in the older population. Although not a classical infectious disease, the role of bacteria in causing periodontitis is unequivocal with several bacterial species such as Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia being implicated as causative agents. The virulence of periodontal pathogens is attributed not only to bacterial factors that directly damage tissue but also to their ability to dysregulate the host immune response. We are currently investigating the ability of periodontal pathogens to modulate the immune response by altering the expression of specific microRNA, which in turn influence the expression of components of the innate immune response

Professor Alison Loescher
a.loescher@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

In 2003 I initiated a service to manage patients with chronic orofacial pain. The service is now well established and receives referrals from a wide geographic area, including many tertiary referrals. The rarer causes of facial pain are frequently seen within the clinic making it a valuable teaching clinic for both medical and dental higher surgical trainees and dental undergraduate students. In the development of the facial pain service, links have been made with colleagues in neurosurgery, neuromedicine and palliative care. Weekly clinics, held with neurosurgery, review patients with trigeminal neuralgia requiring surgical treatment. This clinical interest in facial pain forms the basis for some of the research projects that are currently being undertaken.

Professor Zoe Marshman
z.marshman@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Research interests

My main interest is child-centred dental research to increase understanding of the impact of oral health and dental care on children and young people. My work involves inclusive research with children with the aim of informing policy and clinical practice.

I co-ordinate the Children and Young People Oral Health Research Group, a multidisciplinary team conducting research with children using a range of research methods

Professor Nicolas Martin
n.martin@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Synthesis and application of nano-particulate materials for dental applications.

The application of nucleating agents for the remineralisation of dentine

Integrity of structurally compromised restored teeth as compound systems

Optimisation of ceramic crown-tooth compound systems

Development and characterisation of novel restorative systems.

Remote digital communication for the provision of health care in dentistry

Development of L&T in restorative dentistry

Clinical evaluation of restorative systems

Dr Cheryl Miller
c.a.miller@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

My research interests are varied, interdisciplinary and lie within the field of materials for biomedical and dental applications. My research focuses on the design, fabrication and characterisation of novel glasses, ceramics and composites for dental and medical applications. Much of this research is in collaboration with Engineering Materials (UoS), Imperial College London, Chubu University, Japan and Sao Paulo University, Brazil. My research has also progressed to the production of custom prostheses using novel production methods and advanced manufacturing techniques such as additive manufacture, Hot-Isostatic-Pressing, Spark-Laser-Sintering, freeze-casting, laser machining and electro-spinning. In addition, due to my involvement in the MMedSci in Dental Implantology, I also supervise projects in the area of dental implantology.

My research is progressing more towards knowledge and technology transfer, hence my industrial collaborations are widening and increasing, presently these include Ceramisys Ltd (a SME manufacturing and distributing bone augmentation materials); Fluidinova (a SME manufacturer of nanoceramics); Primequal (a SME specialising in development of medical devices); neotherix (a regenerative medicine SME specialising in novel bioresorbable scaffolds); CERAM (materials testing, analysis and consultancy); JRI (a manufacturer of orthopaedic implants and surgical instrumentation); Nobel Biocare (a world leader in innovative restorative and aesthetic dental solutions); Dentsply (a global leading manufacturer and distributer of high quality dental product) and GlaxoSmithKline (one of the world's leading research-based pharmaceutical and healthcare companies).

Dr Keyvan Moharamzadeh
k.moharamzadeh@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

I am interested in multidisciplinary research in the field of dental biomaterials and tissue engineering. My main research activities fall into four different categories:

  • Tissue engineering of human oral mucosa and development of three-dimensional tissue models for various in vitro applications.
  • Biocompatibility assessment of dental biomaterials and oral healthcare products.
  • Chemical synthesis and analysis of polymers and composite materials used in dentistry and medicine.
  • Investigation of physical and optical properties of different types of aesthetic dental materials.

See:
Centre for Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering:
http://www.cbte.group.shef.ac.uk/research/te6.html
and
Bioengineering and Health Technologies Research Group

Professor Craig Murdoch
c.murdoch@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Head and Neck Cancer

Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) ranks among the top ten most common cancers worldwide. The survival rate for this cancer is poor, largely due to late diagnosis and a lack of effective therapeutic agents.

In collaboration with other members of the Oral Disease Cluster, I am pursuing a number of research avenues which aim to use diagnostic markers for early detection of HNSCC, to elucidate novel therapeutic targets to halt disease progression, to understand how tumour cells interact with the endothelium during metastasis and to study the interaction between stromal cells (fibroblasts, leukocytes) and tumour cells in the tumour microenvironment.

Host-microbial interactions

The mucosa of the oral cavity is constantly in contact with many different types of micro-organisms. Some of these are commensal organisms whilst others cause disease.

I am interested in how the fungal organism Candida albicans and the Gram-negative bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis interact with the oral mucosa and the molecular mechanisms of the host innate immune system against these pathogens.

https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/dentalschool/research/ibio/hub

Dr Ilida Ortega Asencio
i.ortega@sheffield.ac.uk

School of Clinical Dentistry
Dr Janine Owens
jan.owens@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Research interests

My research interests fall into four areas; disability and marginalised groups, embodiment and experiences of oral health, health promotion, and cultural beliefs and practices related to health.  I work across-disciplines bringing in disability studies, psychology, political theory and sociology to dentistry.

I am a member of the British Society of Disability and Oral Health Teacher's Group which seeks to expand teaching and knowledge of disability within undergraduate and postgraduate curricula. It also contributes to policy for children and adults with disabilities.

My main areas of expertise are disability studies, qualitative research and its related methods and methodologies. My aim is to promote inclusion in research so we are working with people, not researching on them.  One example is co-production and the benefits of working directly with community groups such as people with learning disabilities and/or parents and children. Another example is using narrative to release the voices of people who may be unable to verbalise. 

Dr Sarah Pollington
s.pollington@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

My main fields of research include ceramics and adhesive dentistry and I am an active member of the Oral Biomaterials Research Group at the School of Clinical Dentistry since 2002. I am involved in the development of novel glass-ceramics including manufacture and characterisation of various ceramics for use as indirect CAD/CAM core restorative materials and veneering ceramics. This work has concentrated on the production of materials with improved strength and durability. Other areas of research are the integrity of structurally compromised restored teeth and the clinical evaluation of restorative systems.

Professor Helen Rodd
h.d.rodd@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Research interests

My current research programme is driven by Health and Social policy which have highlighted the need to be more inclusive of children in decisions about their healthcare, as well as involving them more actively in health-related research and service development. In line with this, a key research objective is to develop robust patient-centred clinical outcome measures for use in dentistry. These will have important application within the NHS in determining the benefits of various treatment modalities in order to more effectively direct resource allocation.

I work within a unique multi-disciplinary research group at the University of Sheffield, the ‘Person Centered and Population Oral Health’ group, which includes researchers across several clinical specialities and social sciences. The group conducts and implements high quality research in oral health, utilising the theories and empirical traditions of dental public health, sociology and psychology and a range of methodologies.

Dr Joey Shepherd
j.shepherd@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

The global rise in antibiotic resistance means there is an absolute requirement for novel or repurposed antimicrobial therapies. I am interested in the use of ultrasound both as an antimicrobial treatment and as a co-treatment in maximising the efficiency of antibiotic use. I am also interested in host-pathogen interactions, using 3D tissue engineered skin models to examine effects of infection and treatment on both bacteria and human cells. The infected skin models are also proving to be very useful in testing novel antimicrobial wound dressings  and bacteria sensitive polymers which may be developed as either treatments or for rapid diagnosis of wound infection.

Professor Graham Stafford
G.Stafford@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

The Group takes a multidisciplinary approach to investigating a range of biological problems ranging form basic biology to prototype translational projects.  There are several areas of research within the group which centres around the study of human pathogens with an overall aim at understanding microbial disease processes and exploiting the knowledge we generate for translational purposes wherever possible.

Periodontal pathogens: Our main focus over the last few years has centered on Gram-negative anaerobic species, mainly Tannerella forsythia (pictured) and Porphyromonas gingivalis that are involved in the common disease periodontitis, estimated to affect 300 million people worldwide.  However, most of the processes which we study in these bacteria are relevant to a range of human pathogenic bacteria with wide-ranging microbiological implications.  For example we have focused on biofilm formation, host-interactions and the role of sialic acid in periodontal pathogens.

Synthetic Biology: Our other main focus is in the developing area of Synthetic Biology where we are working to exploit biotechnological possibilities exploiting biological knowledge of pathogenic bacteria with a particular focus on protein secretion systems and bacterial adhesins.

The group  employ a variety of genetic and biochemical techniques while in collaboration with colleagues in the Department of Chemical and Process Engineering and Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (MBB) we also apply a range of biophysical, biochemical and proteomic techniques to answer key questions within our areas of interest.

Professor Martin Thornhill
m.thornhill@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

1. Tissue engineering, biocompatibility and in vitro modelling of disease

Also see:

Centre for Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering - Tissue engineering of oral mucosa

Centre for Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering - Biocompatibility testing and evaluation

Centre for Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering - Tissue engineering of oral mucosa

2. Cellular interactions with the endothelial lining of blood vessel

Centre for Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering - Tissue engineering of blood vessels

3. Targeted drug delivery

Centre for Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering -Tissue engineering of oral mucosa

4. Genetic epidemiology of oral disease

Dr Mario Vettore
m.vettore@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Research interests

My research interests include the link between oral conditions and general health, inequalities in oral health, social determinants of oral health and oral health related quality of life. My expertise involves quantitative methods and statistical multi-level modeling as well as systematic reviews and meta-analysis.

Dr Simon Whawell
s.whawell@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Integrins, proteases and the extracellular matrix in the modification of epithelial cell behaviour, oral squamous cell carcinoma invasion in particular.

Epithelial-bacterial interactions, including mechanisms of bacterial invasion and strategies for killing intracellular bacteria