Dr Sarah Son

BA, MA, PhD

School of East Asian Studies

Lecturer in Korean Studies

A profile image of Sarah Son
s.a.son@sheffield.ac.uk

Full contact details

Dr Sarah Son
School of East Asian Studies
Jessop West
1 Upper Hanover Street
Sheffield
S3 7RA
Profile

Dr Sarah Son joined SEAS in August 2019. She completed her PhD on identity and inter-Korean relations at the School of Oriental and African Studies in London in 2014, before spending five years working in South Korea in the non-profit sector on North Korean human rights issues.

Her work there included human rights research and monitoring; reporting and media engagement; consulting with the United Nations, foreign missions and advocacy organisations; and project management of human rights documentation training for NGOs both in and outside Korea.

Her current research involves methods of monitoring and recording human rights abuses in North Korea through interviews with North Korean escapees to South Korea.

She is involved in a project that uses Geospatial Information Systems (GIS) technology to map the locations of abuses, as well as relevant event information.

Alongside this work, she is investigating the potential use of the data gathered on human rights abuses in current and future efforts to pursue accountability for violations.

Dr. Son also conducts and supervises research on themes including migration and diaspora, contemporary social movements, popular culture, international relations, nation branding, identity, security and peace-building, with a focus on both the Korean Peninsula and East Asia more broadly.

Within Sheffield’s School of East Asian Studies, Dr. Son teaches on the Korean Studies undergraduate programme.

Qualifications
  • BA (Bond University)
  • MA (SOAS, University of London)
  • PhD (SOAS, University of London)
Research interests

Dr. Son’s research background is in the role of identity in international relations, particularly as it affects the inter-Korean divide – both at the state level and at the level of social interactions between North and South Koreans.

Her research is interdisciplinary at times, drawing on aspects of anthropology, sociology and history to understand the role of social relationships in the complex politics of the region.

Her past research has looked at questions of identity in the policy practice of North and South Korea on a number of issues, including North Korean escapees, international human rights norms and multiculturalism policy.

As a result of her professional work in the NGO sector on North Korean human rights issues, her current research concentrates on methods of monitoring and recording human rights abuses in North Korea, through interviews with North Korean escapees in South Korea.

She is involved in a long-term project based in Seoul that uses Geospatial Information Systems (GIS) technology to map locations of abuses, as well as relevant event information.

Dr. Son also conducts and supervises research on themes including migration and diaspora, contemporary social movements, popular culture, international relations, nation branding, identity, security and peace-building, with a focus on the Korean Peninsula and East Asia more broadly.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Teaching activities

I have always had love of learning, and a large part of this has been down to those who have taught me various subjects across my academic career with clear passion and enthusiasm for their subject matter.

These are qualities I work to emulate in my own teaching, while incorporating a range of activities that give students opportunities to learn and practice key skills they can apply in their careers as graduates.

My modules encourage students to develop confidence and independence in their learning, while gaining an understanding of the issues that face the region from a range of perspectives.

Professional activities

Recent non-academic publications: