Dr Heather Ellis, MA (Oxon), MPhil, DPhil, PGCertAP, FHEA, FRHistS

Photograph of Dr Heather EllisVice-Chancellor’s Fellow
Tel: (+44) (0)114 222 3627
Fax: (+44) (0)114 222 8105
Email: h.l.ellis@sheffield.ac.uk
Room: 6.11

Research Interests

Research interests

Heather Ellis is a member of the Centre for the Study of Higher Education in the School of Education at Sheffield. She is also a member of the Executive Committee of the History of Education Society, UK and a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society.

Heather’s main field of research is the history of education, particularly, the history of universities. Currently, her research focuses on the historical development of disciplinary boundaries between the arts and humanities and natural sciences. Her project as a Vice-Chancellor’s Fellow is entitled The Classical Origins of Modern Science in Britain, 1800-1850. It constitutes the first ever investigation into the cultural, discursive and ideological importance of classical studies and classical scholarship in shaping and defining the emergence of modern science in Britain as a coherent set of disciplines, both in an academic and public context, during the first half of the nineteenth century. Drawing on the extensive archives of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, the project explores the complex and multifaceted ways in which the classics were utilised creatively as a cultural resource of immense importance by the men and women responsible for pioneering modern scientific discourse in Britain.

Heather’s first monograph, Generational Conflict and University Reform: Oxford in the Age of Revolution (Brill, 2012) won the Kevin Brehony Prize  for the best first book in the history of education. The book offers a fresh interpretation of a series of ground-breaking reforms introduced at the University of Oxford in the first half of the nineteenth century. Innovations such as competitive examination, a uniform syllabus and a broad range of degree subjects have often been seen as products of the reforming zeal of early nineteenth-century Britain. By contrast, this book argues that many such developments are more accurately understood as attempts by senior university members and government officials to respond to the challenge posed by a new generation of confident, politically-aware students influenced by the ideas of the American and French Revolutions.

Other research interests

In addition, Heather’s research includes the history of masculinity and gender. She has recently completed the manuscript for her second monograph, Masculinity and Science in Britain, 1831-1918, which explores the relationship between masculine identity and scientific discourse in nineteenth and early twentieth-century Britain. It is due to be published with Palgrave Macmillan in 2016. Additional research interests include the history of transnational scholarly networks, historical juvenile delinquency and the history of classical scholarship and classical reception.

Recent Funded Projects

Juvenile Delinquency in 19th and 20th Centuries: National and Transnational Perspectives. Social History Society. Dr Heather Ellis. (Awarded 2015).

Actor-Networks between Global Markets and the Nation, 1650-1950. Fritz-Thyssen-Stiftung, Cologne. Dr Heather Ellis and Dr Simone Mueller-Pohl (Freie Universität Berlin). (Awarded 2013).

Juvenile Delinquency and the Limits of Western Influence: East-West Comparisons. Fritz-Thyssen-Stiftung, Cologne. Dr Heather Ellis (Awarded 2011).

The Changing Role of the Humanities in the Academy and Society: Historical and Transnational Perspectives. Fritz-Thyssen-Stiftung, Cologne. Dr Heather Ellis and Dr Georgia Christinidis (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin) (Awarded 2011).

Anglo-German Scholarly Networks in the Long Nineteenth Century. Centre for British Studies, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin. Dr Heather Ellis and Dr Ulrike Kirchberger (University of Bayreuth).

Doctoral Supervision

I welcome applications from students wishing to study for doctoral research degrees, and would be particularly interested in hearing from applicants who wish to undertake research in the history of education, history of universities, history of science and gender and education.

Teaching

Teaching

Heather gained her PGCert in Academic Practice from Liverpool Hope University in 2013 and is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. She has taught a wide variety of undergraduate and postgraduate courses in both history and education studies. Before starting at Sheffield, she taught at Oxford University, Oxford Brookes University, the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and Liverpool Hope University. At Liverpool Hope, Heather was a Senior Lecturer in History of Education responsible for designing, organising and delivering all courses in the History of Education at both undergraduate and postgraduate level. She has supervised many successful MA theses on a variety of historical and educational topics. She would be happy to supervise EdD or PhD students looking to work in any area of the history of education.

Other Experience

In June 2014 Heather completed a commissioned research report entitled The Evolution of the Teenager for National Citizen Service.

Activities

Activities

  • Fellow of the Royal Historical Society
  • Fellow of the Higher Education Academy
  • Member of the Executive Committee of the Historical Education Society UK
  • Member of the Editorial Board of History of Education
  • Grant Application reviewer for ESRC (Since 2012)
  • Winner of the Kevin Brehony Prize (2014) for the best first book in the History of Education
  • Member of British Association of Victorian Studies (BAVS), Society for the History of Childhood and Youth (SHCY), Social History Society and British Educational Research Association (BERA).
  • Article referee and book reviewer for History of Education, Cultural and Social History, English Historical Review, Economic History Review, Punishment and Society
Publications

Books

Ellis, H. (under contract). The Classical Origins of Modern Science in Britain, 1800-1850. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Ellis, H. (forthcoming 2016). Masculinity and Science in Britain, 1831-1918. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Ellis, H. (2012). Generational Conflict and University Reform: Oxford in the Age of Revolution. Leiden & Boston: Brill.

Books - Edited

Ellis, H. (Ed.). (2014). Juvenile Delinquency and the Limits of Western Influence, 1850-2000. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Ellis, H. and Kirchberger, U. (Eds.). (2014). Anglo-German Scholarly Networks in the Long Nineteenth Century. Leiden & Boston.

Journal Articles

Ellis, H. (2015). Knowledge, Character and Professionalization in Nineteenth-Century British Science. History of Education 43:6, 777-792. doi: 10.1080/0046760X.2014.964006

Ellis, H. (2014). Thomas Arnold, Christian Manliness and the Problem of Boyhood. Journal of Victorian Culture 19:4, 425-441. doi: 10.1080/13555502.2014.969975

Ellis, H. (2014). Foppish Masculinity, Generational Identity and the University Authorities in Eighteenth-Century Oxbridge. Cultural and Social History 11:3, 367-384. doi: 10.2752/147800414X13983595303318

Ellis, H. (2013). Efficiency and Counter-Revolution: Connecting University and Civil Service Reform in the 1850s. History of Education 42:1, 23-44. doi:10.1080/0046760X.2012.697922

Ellis, H. (2012). Reconciling Classical and Christian Culture? Marcus Aurelius and his Meditations in Victorian Scholarship. New Voices in Classical Reception Studies 7, 1-12.

Ellis, H. (2011). ‘A Manly and Generous Discipline’?: Classical Studies and Generational Conflict in Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth Century Oxford. History of Universities 25:2, 143-172. doi: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199694044.001.0001

View a full list of Heather Ellis’s publications