Massive Stars

The central region of the Tarantula Nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Credit: NASA, ESA, P Crowther
The central region of the Tarantula Nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Credit: NASA, ESA, P Crowther
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Academic staff: Professor Paul Crowther

Postdoctoral researchers: Dr Joachim Bestenlehner

PhD students: Thaer Alkousa

Honorary Professor: Professor Andy Pollock


Massive stars

Massive stars play a leading role in the ecology of galaxies via their radiative, chemical and mechanical feedback, although their evolutionary pathways remain unclear. We are interested in the evolution of the most massive stars in the universe from the main-sequence to late evolutionary stages (red supergiants, Wolf-Rayet stars).

We exploit X-ray, ultraviolet, optical and infrared datasets of massive stars from ground- (VLT) and space-based observatories (HST, Chandra, Spitzer) in combination with state-of-the-art analysis tools, stellar atmosphere computations and stellar structure calculations.

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