Teaching Reproducible Research and Open Science Conference

A tutor talking to two students in a classroom

Event details

20-22 June 2023
FoSS New Build - Sheffield, UK

Description

Organisers: University of Sheffield (Sheffield Methods Institute, Open Research Working Group and University Library) and Project TIER.

Reproducibility has gained significant attention in research, and many disciplines have now adopted policies recognizing the value of open scholarship. However, it has not yet assumed a central place in the teaching of research methods. We would like to invite academics to discuss the benefits of teaching reproducible research and open science at undergraduate and postgraduate levels.

This three day event consists of a one-day symposium with conference style presentations, a workshop on teaching transparent methods of empirical research, and individual or small group in-person consultations with Project TIER Directors.

Attendees are welcome to join individual days or for the full conference duration - further information on attendance options with be available via the event booking system. Bookings will open in February.

If you have any questions regarding the conference please contact smi@sheffield.ac.uk

Call for Papers - Symposium: Perspectives on teaching reproducibility

Reproducibility has gained a lot of attention in research and many disciplines have adopted policies recognizing the value of open scholarship. The teaching of reproducible methods has received somewhat less attention, but is no less important. Some excellent examples are documented in the November 2022 issue of Journal of Statistics and Data Science Education, where a number of instructors reflect on "Teaching reproducibility and responsible workflow" and how to embed reproducible workflows, data management and transparent reporting in courses and programmes. 

This symposium will focus on taught programmes (both undergraduate and postgraduate), which have not so far received as much attention in the debate on open scholarship as research programmes. We will discuss the importance of teaching principles of open science and doing reproducible research, and the ways in which this might be achieved. 

We are looking for speakers who would like to share their perspectives and experiences of teaching reproducible research. The call is open to:
  • Lecturers and teaching instructors, including graduate teaching assistants
  • Course leaders 
  • Programme coordinators
  • Librarians
  • Learning technologists and other professional colleagues.

Please submit an abstract of 250 words for a 20 minute presentation, or of 500 words for longer presentations of 40 minutes by 24th January 2023 using this form: https://tinyurl.com/teaching-reproducibility

The Symposium is Day 1 of a three day event on ‘Teaching Reproducible Research and Open Science’, Day 2 is a workshop on teaching transparent methods of empirical research, and Day 3 individual or small group in-person consultations with Project TIER Directors. Speakers are welcome to attend the other days of the event or just the symposium. We encourage colleagues from various disciplines to join the discussion of what lessons can be learnt, and what practices transferred from places where teaching reproducible research has already become standard.
Day 1 - Symposium: Perspectives on teaching reproducibility

The Open Scholarship movement has developed in response to the replication crises in many disciplines and has led to a change in research standards towards more reproducible and transparent conduct. These developments have in turn led to changes in teaching practice in some more ‘data-driven’ disciplines, including psychology, statistics, data science and economics. Some excellent examples are documented in the November 2022 issue of Journal of Statistics and Data Science Education, where a number of instructors reflect on "Teaching reproducibility and responsible workflows" and how to embed reproducible workflows, data management and transparent reporting in courses and programmes. 

This symposium will focus on taught programmes (both undergraduate and postgraduate), which have not gained as much attention in the debate so far as research programmes. We would like to continue the discussion, exploring the importance of teaching principles of open science and doing reproducible research in taught programmes, and the ways in which this might be achieved. 

A number of speakers will reflect on pedagogical values and practicalities in teaching open science and reproducible research from the perspective of course leaders or programme coordinators. We encourage colleagues from various disciplines to join the discussion of what lessons can be learnt, and what practices transferred from places where teaching reproducible research has already become a standard.

Speakers include:

Richard Ball, Project TIER Director, Professor of Economics, Haverford College

Dr Jennifer Buckley, Manchester University

Professor Lisa DeBruine, Centre for Methods & Metascience, University of Glasgow

Simon D. Halliday, Associate Professor of Economics Education, University of Bristol [TBC]

Dr Phil McAleer, School of Psychology & Neuroscience, University of Glasgow 

Norm Medeiros, Project TIER Director, Associate Librarian of the College, Haverford College

Dr Aneta Piekut, Sheffield Methods Institute, University of Sheffield

Day 2 - TIER/UKRN Faculty Development Workshop: Teaching Transparent Methods of Empirical Research

Instructors: 

The workshops introduce participants to methods for conducting and documenting empirical research that ensure the reproducibility of all computational results, and then present a range of pedagogical strategies and curricular resources for teaching these methods to students in a variety of educational settings.

Overview

This workshop is designed for faculty who are interested in integrating principles of transparency and reproducibility into quantitative methods courses and research training.  It will also be of interest to digital librarians, archivists and data professionals who promote and support reproducible research. 

Commitment to inclusion and diversity

As expressed in our Statement on Diversity and Inclusion, Project TIER is committed to serving members of underrepresented minorities, women, and low-income and first-generation students.

We seek to collaborate with colleagues whose talents and perspectives reflect diverse backgrounds and life experiences, and value their distinct perspectives.  Individuals belonging to underrepresented groups, and/or whose teaching and advising will reach large numbers of under-served students, are especially encouraged to apply.

Content of the workshop

The focus of the workshop is practical: the objective is to help instructors develop plans for teaching reproducible research practices that will be feasible and effective in their particular contexts, and prepare them to implement the methods presented at the workshop in their classes and research supervision.

The program of the workshop will include:

· Workflows for reproducible research.  The foundation of the methods presented at the workshop is writing editable scripts (do-files, syntax files, markdown, etc.) that execute all the steps of data processing and analysis for a project.  The workshop will highlight key principles for using scripts to ensure reproducibility.  Examples will be used to illustrate how these principles are implemented in two kinds of workflow:  copy-and-paste (using any scriptable statistical software package) and dynamic documents (using R and R Markdown).

· Teaching strategies.  We will then discuss strategies for teaching students to adopt these reproducible workflows for a wide variety of projects:  from simple homework problems in introductory classes, to more complex lab projects in advanced courses, all the way to theses, dissertations, and original research papers.

· File-sharing platforms. The workshop will demonstrate how the use of a web-based file-sharing platform can facilitate collaboration among students working on projects together, and radically transform the nature of communication between instructors and students.  Examples using the Open Science Framework (OSF) will be presented, but many other suitable platforms are available (Dropbox, Google Drive, GitHub, etc.), and instructors should feel free to use whatever platform they prefer.

· Pedagogical benefits. Some discussion will also be devoted to the pedagogical benefits of teaching reproducible research methods. Learning to adopt reproducible methods enhances students' understanding of their work with statistical data, and provides critical job skills. Practising these methods also reinforces fundamental principles of inquiry, argument, and integrity that are essential elements in the education of all students, regardless of their later career paths.

Project Tier Logo
Day 3 - Consultations with Project TIER Directors

Richard and Norm will be available to hold individual and small-group meetings with instructors interested in introducing reproducible methods into their classes; librarians and archivists who would like to support reproducibility efforts throughout the research lifecycle; graduate students and their advisors who would like to  incorporate reproducible methods into their research and research advising; and other academic staff who would like to discuss benefits of adopting reproducible workflows.

Text that says Why Numbers Matter

Why Numbers Matter

SMI's series on why it's important to get numbers right.

Events at the University

Browse upcoming public lectures, exhibitions, family events, concerts, shows and festivals across the University.