Sophie NewmanDr Sophie Newman

BSc(Hons Anatomical Sciences; MSc Palaeopathology; PhD

Research Technician and Demonstrator in Human Osteology

Email address:

sophie.newman@sheffield.ac.uk

Department address:

Department of Archaeology

University of Sheffield

Minalloy House. Room D13

10-16 Regent Street

S1 3NJ


Biography

I studied Anatomical Sciences at the University of Dundee from 2007-2011, where I first became interested in the study of human skeletal remains from archaeological contexts. I then studied for an MSc in Palaeopathology at Durham University (2011-2012), where I remained to undertake my PhD research focusing on child health in the Industrial Revolution. Following the completion of my doctorate in 2016, I worked as a commercial osteoarchaeologist for York Osteoarchaeology, before starting my role as Research Technician and Lab Demonstrator in Human Osteology at Sheffield in 2017.

Professional Roles

• Associate Fellow of the Higher Education Academy
• Committee Secretary for the Society for the Study of Childhood in the Past (SSCIP)

Research

Research Interests

I specialise in the study of human osteology and palaeopathology, particularly in relation to children and child health in the past.

My main research interests are:

• Human osteology and palaeopathology
• Human growth and development
• Health in 18th-19th century England
• The bioarchaeology of children and childhood
• Vitamin D deficiency in the past
• Social status, and the impact of social inequality on health

Selected Publications

Refereed Journal Articles

• Newman, S.L. and Gowland, R.L. (2016) Dedicated followers of fashion? Bioarchaeological perspectives on socio-economic status, inequality, and health in urban children from the Industrial Revolution (18th -19th C), England. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 27(2):217-229

• Newman, S.L. and Gowland, R.L. (2015) The use of non-adult vertebral dimensions as indicators of growth disruption and non-specific health stress in skeletal populations. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 158(1):155-164.

Book Chapters

• Gowland, R.L. and Newman, S.L. (in press) Children of the revolution: childhood health inequalities and the life course during industrialisation of the 18th to 19th centuries. In: P. Beauchesne and S. Agarwal (eds.). Children and Childhood in the Past. Florida: University of Florida Press.

Selected Unpublished Osteological Reports

• Newman, S. and Holst, M. (2017) ‘Osteological Analysis, Mansell Farm, Newbold on Stour, Tredlington, Warwickshire’, York Osteoarchaeology for Archaeology Warwickshire. June 2017.
• Newman, S. and Holst, M. (2017) ‘Osteological Analysis, Bush Heath Lane, Harbury, Warwickshire’, York Osteoarchaeology for Archaeology Warwickshire. May 2017.
• Newman, S. and Holst, M. (2017) ‘Osteological Analysis, Land at Salford Road, Bidford-on-Avon, Warwickshire’, York Osteoarchaeology for Archaeology Warwickshire. March 2017.
• Newman, S. and Holst, M. (2017) ‘Osteological Analysis, All Saints Church, Bingley, Bradford, West Yorkshire’, York Osteoarchaeology for WYAS. February 2017.
• Newman, S. and Holst, M. (2017) ‘Osteological Analysis, GP Surgery, Market Place, Masham, North Yorkshire’, York Osteoarchaeology for Solstice Heritage. January 2017.
• Newman, S. (2017) ‘Analysis of the Disarticulated Human Bone Recovered from Lindisfarne (LDF16)’, for DigVentures. January 2017.
• Newman, S. and Holst, M. (2016) ‘Osteological Analysis, Chapel Street, Hazel Grove, Greater Manchester’, York Osteoarchaeology. August 2016.
• Newman, S. and Holst, M. (2016) ‘Osteological Analysis, Low Street, Sherburn In Elmet, North Yorkshire’, York Osteoarchaeology, No.1416. May 2016.

Conferences

Co-organiser of the Little Lives Conference 2016, Durham University

Recent conference presentations:

• April 2016 - Newman, S.L. “Life in the Shadows: the impact of social status, geographic location, and vitamin D deficiency on child health in 18th-19th century England” AAPA Conference – New Orleans
• September 2016 – Newman, S.L. “Best of Both Worlds? Child-care practices and child health within the English middle class family, (18th-19th C).” SSCIP Conference: Family in the Past Perspective – Durham University
• September 2016 – Newman, S.L., Gowland, R.L., Caffell, A.C. “North and South: a comprehensive analysis of non-adult growth in the Industrial Revolution (18th-19th C), England.” BABAO 2016 – Kent University
• September 2015 – Newman, S.L., Gowland, R.L. “The Backbone of Growth: investigating non-adult vertebral indicators of growth disruption.” BABAO 2015 - Sheffield University
• September 2015 – Newman, S.L., Gowland, R.L. “Dedicated Followers of Fashion? Bioarchaeological perspectives on socio-economic status and health in urban children from the Industrial Revolution.“ EAA Conference 2015 - University of Glasgow