Dr Ursula Rothe

Teaching Associate, Classics Department, School of History Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
ursula.rothe@ed.ac.uk

Dr Ursula Rothe

Dress and identity in the Danube provinces: ideal vs reality

This research will try to establish patterns of dress behaviour in the Danube provinces in the Roman period with special focus on the province of Noricum. The source base for such a study in the Danube provinces is particularly rich: the Roman practice of commissioning grave monuments with portraits and other relief images was widespread in the region and hundreds of examples survive, some with their original inscriptions. Moreover, the nature of native dress styles in the region, with their large amounts of metal accessories, mean that dress behaviour can also be traced to an extent in grave contexts. This means that there is the potential to test the idealised portraits on the grave monuments against the more objective grave good evidence to determine how realistic the portraits were. The focus will be on the various social groups represented in the available sources as defined by occupation, gender, wealth status, legal status, geographical region and place of origin (=ethnicity?). The aim is to gain insights into the nature of the group identities present in regions that were incorporated into the Roman Empire, and in so doing to explore the effects of Roman rule on native populations.