Seminars

Find out about upcoming seminars in the Department of Chemistry.

Dainton Building
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February - May 2021

All departmental seminars are held via Blackboard Collaborate, unless stated otherwise. Departmental Seminars will all be held at 1pm on Wednesdays. Please always check the time as it might change for some speakers.

February

 


Departmental seminar: Exploiting Physical Organic Principle in Selective Reaction Design

10 February 13:00 - CANCELLED (TO BE RESCHEDULED)
Blackboard Collaborate

Speaker: Prof. Dr. R. Gilmour
(Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster)

Contact: Prof Anthony Meijer

Abstract

Controlling molecular space in 2- and 3-dimensions is a challenge that continues to be intensively pursued. In this lecture, contra-thermodynamic isomerisation via energy transfer catalysis will be discussed together with our latest contributions to the field of stereoelectronic conformational control. Molecular design strategies that profit from the intrinsic stereoelectronic and electrostatic effects of fluorinated organic molecules have mainly been restricted to bio-organic chemistry. Indeed, many fluorine conformational effects remain academic curiosities with no immediate application. However, the renaissance of organocatalysis offers the possibility to exploit many of these well-described phenomena for molecular preorganisation.


Departmental seminar: Targeting of Cell Permeable Metal Complexes Luminophores for Imaging and Therapy.

17 February 13:00
Blackboard Collaborate

Speaker: Dr. Tia E. Keyes
(Dublin City University)

Contact: Prof Jim Thomas

Abstract

Transition metal luminophores are emerging as important tools for intracellular imaging and sensing.   Their putative suitability for such applications had long been recognised but poor membrane permeability and cytotoxicity were significant barriers that impeded early progress. In recent years, numerous effective routes to overcoming these issues have been reported, inspired in part by advances and insights from the pharmaceutical and drug delivery domains.  In particular, the conjugation of biomolecules and other less natural synthetic species, from a repertoire of functional motifs have been applied .  They grant membrane permeability, cellular targeting and reduce cytotoxicity to transition metal complexes, and offer valuable avenues to circumvent problems leading to promising candidates for application in bioimaging, sensing and diagnostics.

In this contribution I will discuss our efforts to drive ruthenium (II) and Os(II)  polypyridyl luminophores across the cell membrane and in particular to drive them selectively to the repositories of DNA, the mitochondria and nucleus, within the living cell.  We demonstrate that judicious combination of cell penetrating or signal peptide and metal complex can enable precision-targeting to DNA with high selectivity within these organelles within live cells and indeed can be used to drive conjugates deeply into tumor spheroids opening opportunities for imaging and therapy.

I will also discuss some of the limitations that we have  that there are limitations to the effectiveness of these approaches which appear to depend on the lipophilicity of the metal centre and I discuss also, other non-biological appendages that can reliably ensure cell permeability.


Departmental Seminar: Transfer-dominated Branching Radical Telomerisation - novel uses for old chemistries

24 February 13:00
Blackboard Collaborate

Speaker: Dr Steve Rannard
(University of Liverpool)

Contact: Dr Seb Spain

Abstract

Branched polymers have been of academic and industrial interest for decades and their synthesis may be achieved by various strategies. Step-growth polymerisation and chain-growth mechanisms are both reported in the literature and industry has utilised both. We recently employed telomerisation chemistry, that is typically used to make very small molecules, in the formation of very high molecular weight branched polymers. We have named this approach TBRT and it utilises common free radical chain-growth mechanisms but generates step-growth backbone polymers. The talk will describe the background and the approach that we have developed and the licensing of this new polymer synthesis technique to Scott Bader - leading to the formation of Polymer Mimetics Ltd.

March

Departmental Seminar: The Role of Excimers in Singlet Fission

3 March, 10am
Blackboard Collaborate

Speaker: Tim Schmidt
(University of New South Wales)

Contact: Prof Anthony Meijer

Abstract

There are many applications that demand that the properties of light be controlled by molecular excitons. This includes upconversion applications, where shorter wavelengths are generated from longer wavelengths, and multiple exciton generation and photon multiplication, where a high energy photon is split into smaller energy packets. Over the past decade, we have applied triplet-triplet annihilation upconversion to photovoltaics. Recently, we achieved photochemical upconversion from beyond the silicon bandgap for the first time.

Singlet fission is a process where a photon-generated singlet state splits into two spin-correlated triplets. In solar cells it is hoped that this will give rise to two excitons per absorbed photon above a certain energy, increasing the efficiency limit to nearly 46%. Here I will discuss the role of the excimer state in singlet fission.

Departmental Seminar: TBA

10 March 13:00
Blackboard Collaborate

Speaker: Dr. Suprem Das
(University of Kansas)

Contact: Dr Natalia Martsinovich

Abstract

TBA


Departmental Seminar: TBA

17 March 13:00
Blackboard Collaborate

Speaker: Dr Abbie Trewin
(University of Lancaster)

Contact: Dr Rob Dawson

Abstract

TBA


Departmental Seminar: TBA

24 March 13:00
Blackboard Collaborate

Speaker: Prof Serena Corr
(University of Sheffield)

Contact: Prof Steve Armes

Abstract

TBA

April

Departmental Seminar: TBA

21 April 13:00
Blackboard Collaborate

 

Speaker: Dr Olof Johanssen
(University of Edinburgh)

Contact: Prof Julia Weinstein

Abstract

TBA


Departmental Seminar: TBA

24 April 13:00
Blackboard Collaborate

 

Speaker: Dr Anna Slater
(University of Liverpool)

Contact: Dr Jona Foster

Abstract

TBA

May

Departmental Seminar: TBA

5 May 13:00
Blackboard Collaborate

Speaker: Dr Susannah Coote
(University of Lancaster)

Contact: Dr Ben Partridge

Abstract

TBA


Departmental Seminar: TBA

12 May 13:00
Blackboard Collaborate

Speaker: Dr Susan Quinn
(University of Dublin)

Contact: Prof Julia Weinstein

Abstract
TBA

 


 

Summer 2021

June

Departmental Seminar: TBA

June 13:00 
Blackboard Collaborate

Speaker: TBA

Contact: Prof Anthony Meijer

Abstract

TBA


Departmental Seminar: TBA

 June 13:00 
Blackboard Collaborate

Speaker: TBA


Contact: Prof Anthony Meijer

Abstract

TBA

July

Departmental Seminar

 July 2020 13:00
Blackboard Collaborate

Speaker: TBA

Contact: Prof Anthony Meijer

Abstract
TBA

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