Seminars

Find out about upcoming seminars in the Department of Chemistry.

Dainton Building

January - May 2020

All departmental seminars are held in the Dainton Building, Lecture Theatre 1, unless stated otherwise. Departmental Seminars in Semester 2 will all be held at 12 noon.

January

Sheffield Stereochemistry 2020

14 January 10:00
Richard Roberts Auditorium


Cluster seminar: Deep Blue Organic TADF Emitters for Electroluminescent Devices

16 January 16:00
Dainton Building LT1

Speaker: Prof Eli Zysman-Colman
(University of St Andrews)

Contact: Prof Julia Weinstein

Abstract

The first generation OLEDs were based on organic fluorescent emitters. Their efficiency was intrinsically capped at 25% due to only being able to recruit singlet excitons. The second generation OLEDs have employed organometallic phosphorescent emitters, which harvest both singlet and triplet excitons for emission due to the enhanced intersystem crossing mediated by the heavy metals such as iridium(III) and platinum(II). 

These metal complexes possess very desirable optoelectronic properties and lead to very efficient OLED devices. However, the rarity of these metals, their high cost and their toxicity are important detracting features that inhibit large-scale, worldwide adoption of OLED technology, particularly for lighting where, unlike displays, low cost devices are crucial to market growth. The third generation OLEDs are based on small organic compounds that emit via a thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) mechanism. As with phosphorescent emitters, OLEDs using these emitters can recruit 100% of the excitons. In this presentation, we present our recent efforts towards blue emitter in electroluminescent devices.


Industrial seminar: How did I end up doing engineering? From the CDT to Industry

22 January 14:00
Dainton Building LT1

Speaker: Dr. Luke Fox
(JaguarLandRover)

Contact: Dr Jennifer Dick

Abstract

Dr Luke Fox is a Sheffield and CDT for Polymers, Colloids and Soft Matter alumnus. Having studied Chemistry at the University of York with a placement at AkzoNobel working on polymers, he then joined the CDT in 2014 at the University of Sheffield for his PhD. Luke’s PhD was investigating the use of polypropylene in an emerging Additive Manufacturing technique, as a part of the first cohort of students through the CDT at Sheffield.

Having enjoyed his time at the university and academic life, he decided to move into industry and join Jaguar Land Rover to work as an internal technology consultant, with the opportunity to apply what he had learnt through his research and studies into rapidly developing area of manufacturing. In his talk, he will discuss the differences between academic and industrial life, the issues facing large-scale automotive manufacturers and how technology can be used to tackle these problems. He will also comment on what happens to companies that are affected by financial difficulties and what this can mean for their employees.


Theory and Light-Matter Interactions Cluster Seminar: On the importance of intermediate states in the TADF mechanism: the more the better?

23 January 13:00
Dainton Building LT1 

Speaker: Dr Julien Eng
(University of Newcastle)

Contact: Dr Julia Weinstein

Abstract

Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence (TADF) has been investigated in the last years as an efficient mean of harvesting the 75 % of triplet population generated upon electrical excitation of an OLED [1]. While the TADF mechanism can be thought as a "simple" reverse intersystem crossing (rISC) between one singlet and one triplet state (S 1 and T 1 ), it has been shown that the underlying mechanism may not be as trivial as that. Indeed, in the hope of minimising the S 1 /T 1 energy gap, and to favour TADF, efforts have been put in the design of Donor(D)-Acceptor(A) type molecules exhibiting low lying charge transfer states.

However, such design presents other drawbacks. Indeed, the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) between states of same nature and different spin multiplicity vanishes and leads to a decrease of the rate of rISC. Even though this direct pathway (S 1 ⇋T 1 ) is closed, alternative routes via close-lying electronic states may provide a way of rISC [2,3]. Multiplying the number of D or A units in order to provide additional secondary pathways for the transfer of population has been the focus of several studies.


In this talk, we first investigate the excited states topology and properties of a D-A [2,3], a D-A-D [4] and a D-A 3 [5,6] organic systems.

February

Theory and Light-Matter Interactions Cluster Seminar: 
Adventures in ultrafast laser spectroscopy at the CLF – new multidimensional IR techniques and new applications in heterogeneous catalysis and ionic liquid research

5 February, 1pm
Dainton Building, LT1

Speaker: Dr Paul Donaldson
Central Laser Facility

Contact: Professor Julia Weinstein

Abstract

2D-IR spectroscopy is able to probe molecular equilibrium structural dynamics and fluctuations on timescales as short as femtoseconds. In this talk it will be shown how the technique can be used to probe the dynamics of small molecules near Zeolite acid sites and in protic ionic liquids. 2D-IR methods also show molecular couplings in a similar fashion to the spin couplings of 2D NMR. This aspect of 2D-IR will be discussed and a new form of 2D-IR spectroscopy developed at the CLF for probing vibrational couplings will be introduced.


Industrial Seminar:
Life after specialisation: a non-linear career in science

12 February 14:00
Dainton Building LT1

Speaker: Dr. Gianfranco Unali
(Unilever)

Contact: Dr Jennifer Dick

Abstract

A look at two decades as an industrial Science & Technology researcher at Unilever: how deviation from the obvious career path has led to a varied and fulfilling career. From Synthetic Chemistry to Physical Chemistry to EU Projects to Disruptive Innovation, Agreements and Contracts and Pseudo Start-ups. However, there’s a caveat: choose your time well and be clear about your motivation.


Departmental Seminar:
New methods for studying battery function and degradation

13 February 12:00
Dainton Building LT1

Speaker: Prof Clare Grey FRS
(University of Cambridge)

Contact: Prof Patrick Fowler FRS

Abstract

This talk will describe techniques developed to study battery processes in situ and the study of electrode materials optimised for safe, fast charging. The second half of the talk will describe approaches developed to understand how EV batteries function and studies aimed at identifying and mitigating key degradation mechanisms

Clare was awarded the 2019 John B Goodenough Award by the RSC, for her  ‘pioneering and innovative uses of magnetic resonance methods to study structure and dynamics in electrochemical devices.'


Departmental Seminar:
Production of Metal-Organic Frameworks using Microwave Technology

27 February 12:00
Dainton Building LT1

Speaker: Dr Andrea Laybourn
University of Nottingham

Contact: Dr Rob Dawson

Abstract

Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are porous materials that show great potential for a wide-range of applications including gas storage and separations, pollutant removal, catalysis, and sensing. However, current states of the art in manufacture have restricted widespread adoption of MOFs for industrial applications, as at scale they deliver poor reproducibility in quality, whilst incurring high energy and capital costs for manufacture meaning that none of the proposed applications are currently economically viable.

The development of technologies that reduce the cost of manufacture in an efficient and sustainable way is a key enabling step in the transfer of MOF research from the laboratory to industrial application. Microwave technology shows great promise for scale up of MOFs as it offers benefits over other methods including significantly reduced reaction times (from hours to seconds), high space time yields and energy efficiency.

This presentation discusses our progress in the synthesis of MOFs using microwave technology, including investigations of the interaction between microwave energy and MOF reactants, studies on the mechanism by which MOFs are produced, and recent progress towards the development of continuous flow microwave reactors for the production of MOFs on the hundreds of grams scale. Notably, our reactors are capable of producing MOFs on astonishing timescales (as low as 2.2 seconds) with a high level of control over MOF properties such as porosity, morphology, particle size and phase; achieved by altering the applied power, treatment time and mixing conditions, all of which are vital for processing MOFs for practical applications.

March

Departmental Seminar: TBA

12 March 12:00
Dainton Building LT1

 

Speaker: Prof Serena Corr
(University of Sheffield)

Contact: Dr Sarah Staniland and Prof Steve Armes FRS

Abstract TBA


Departmental Seminar: TBA

19 March 12:00

Speaker: Professor Eugenia Kumacheva FRS
(University of Toronto)

Contact: Prof Steve Armes FRS

Abstract

Professor Kumacheva was awarded the prestigious RSC de Gennes Prize for her research on the design of soft and self-assembled new materials with biomedical applications.


Departmental Seminar: TBA

26 March 12:00
Dainton Building LT1

Speaker: Dr Abbie Trewin
(University of Lancaster)

Contact: Dr Rob Dawson

Abstract TBA

 
April

Departmental Seminar: TBA

1 April 12:00
Dainton Building LT1

Speaker: TBA

Contact: Dr Seb Spain

Abstract TBA

The MChem Poster Session will follow this seminar (13:00, G-floor).

MChem students present posters about research from their final year research project.


Departmental Seminar: Supramolecular Chemistry under Continuous Flow Conditions

12 April 12:00

Dainton Building LT1

Speaker: Dr Anna Slater
(University of Liverpool)

Contact: Dr Jona Foster

Abstract

Supramolecular materials have attractive properties and uses in pollution remediation, gas storage, and low-energy separations, but their synthesis, characterization, and scale-up is an enduring challenge.

For example, the synthesis of macrocyclic or cage like hosts often requires high dilution conditions and large amounts of solvent; is low yielding, generating significant amounts of waste; or is extremely hard to scale up, limiting the applications of these compounds no matter how good they are at the task in hand.

Using the example of porous organic cages, this talk will detail the benefits of using continuous flow chemistry for controlling the synthesis and self-assembly of supramolecular materials.

By using continuous flow conditions, we are able to move towards sustainable supramolecular synthesis by shortening reaction times, finely controlling mixing and temperature regimes, and scaling-up reactions more readily than in batch.


Departmental Seminar: TBA

30 April 12:00
Dainton Building LT1

Speaker: Dr Susannah Coote
(University of Lancaster)

Contact: Dr Ben Partridge

Abstract TBA

May

Departmental Seminar: TBA

7 May 12:00
Dainton Building LT1

Speaker: Prof Steve Rannard
(University of Liverpool)

Contact: Dr Seb Spain

Abstract TBA


Industrial Seminar

May 
Dainton Building LT1

Speaker: TBA

Contact: Dr Jennifer Dick


 

Summer 2020

June

Industrial Seminar

June 
Dainton Building LT1

Speaker: 

Contact: Dr Jennifer Dick

July

Departmental Seminar

July 
Dainton Building LT1

Speaker: 

Contact: 

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