News

Results 31 to 45 of 262.

  • Thumbnail

    Comment: CO₂ shortage: why can’t we just pull carbon dioxide out of the air?

    As factories battle through the UK's CO2 shortage, our Head of Department, Professor Peter Styring, and Katy Armstrong, manager of the CO2Chem Network he chairs, explain that technology does exist to capture carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, but it has a big cost.

    Categorised under: Comment

  • Thumbnail

    The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2017: Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    Last year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to three scientists who pioneered the work of Cryo-Electron Microscopy (Cryo-EM). Jacques Dubochet from the University of Lausanne, Joachim Frank from Columbia University and Richard Henderson from the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge were awarded the 2017 prize for using the technique for revolutionalising the way we image biomolecular structures in solution.

    Categorised under: Resonance

  • Thumbnail

    Three new grants to support nucleic acid and DNA repair studies

    Three new grants have recently been awarded to staff in our Chemical Biology research cluster, who are working on nucleic acid chemistry and the secrets of DNA replication and repair.

    Categorised under: News

  • Thumbnail

    'Out of This World': First Briton in space delivers first Convocation Lecture

    University of Sheffield chemistry graduate and the first Briton in space, Dr Helen Sharman OBE, delivered the University’s inaugural Convocation Lecture.

    Categorised under: News

  • Thumbnail

    Government report commends University of Sheffield outreach scheme that brings children into chemistry labs

    A University of Sheffield scheme that brings local schoolchildren into the Department of Chemistry to experience life as a scientist has been hailed as an area of good practice in a government report.

    Categorised under: News

  • Prof. Lee Brammer and Dr Tony Haynes

    Angewandte Chemie Publication for Brammer and Haynes

    Recent work involving Prof. Lee Brammer and Dr Tony Haynes, along with a team of collaborators, has resulted in a paper published in Angewandte Chemie on combining homogenous and heterogeneous catalysis

    Categorised under: News and Research

  • Thumbnail

    Plastic Money

    The money in our wallets is changing. The past two years have seen the conversion from old-fashioned "paper" banknotes to modern polymer banknotes, with the introduction of the £5 note in September 2016 and the new £10 note in September 2017 – but what makes these notes better and what heightened security measures do they offer?
     

    Categorised under: Resonance

  • Thumbnail

    Smartphones: Behind the Screen

    The number of smartphone users has increased dramatically in the decade following the release of the first iPhone. But how much do people know about the chemical complexity of the gadget in their pocket, and are there enough resources to keep up with the ever-increasing demand? 

    Categorised under: Resonance

  • Nitrifying Our Earth

    Nitrogen is vital for healthy growth of plants and crops. Artificial fertilisers are added to our crops to supply nitrogen, but could we be driving nitrification of soils too far?

    Categorised under: Resonance

  • Dept2

    Poster prize for Feifan Lang

    Feifan Lang, a PhD student in Prof. Lee Brammer's group has won a poster prize at the British Crystallographic Association Spring Meeting

    Categorised under: News

  • Thumbnail

    Learning and teaching recognition to PhD student Dan Jenkinson

    PhD student Dan Jenkinson has been awarded Associate Fellow status by the Higher Education Academy. The fellowship is part of a programme of professional recognition for university staff and postgraduate students who are involved in learning and teaching.

    Categorised under: News

  • Thumbnail

    Nanobots

    Picture a robot, and the image that might come to mind is one of a metallic machine, often a crude representation of a human, designed to perform simple tasks such as cleaning or cooking. An image less likely to come to mind is that of a nanoparticle-sized machine, moving within your bloodstream. 

    Categorised under: Resonance

  • Thumbnail

    Royal Society of Chemistry Bader Award goes to Joseph Harrity

    Professor Joseph Harrity, our Professor of Synthetic Organic Chemistry, is the Royal Society of Chemistry Bader Award winner for 2018.

    Categorised under: Research

  • Thumbnail

    The Chemistry of Nostalgia

    So many aspects of our seasonal traditions are filled with nostalgia. Out of our five senses, however, it is smell that really transports us back in time. But how is it that smell brings back such strong emotions that none of our other senses can compete with?

    Categorised under: Resonance

  • Thumbnail

    PhD students' posters win prizes at science showcase

    Three PhD students from the Department of Chemistry won prizes at the University of Sheffield's annual Science Graduate School Showcase. 

    Categorised under: News