Professor Adrian Bingham

B.A., D.Phil. (Oxon.)

Department of History

Head of Department

Professor of Modern British History

Professor Adrian Bingham
adrian.bingham@sheffield.ac.uk
+44 114 22 22582

Full contact details

Professor Adrian Bingham
Department of History
1.04
Jessop West
1 Upper Hanover Street
Sheffield
S3 7RA
Profile

I joined the History Department at Sheffield in September 2006.

Before this I read history at Merton College, Oxford, and stayed there to study for my D.Phil. In 2002 I took up a Leverhulme Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Centre for Contemporary British History (CCBH), Institute of Historical Research, University of London.

I remained at the CCBH to hold a three-year British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship.

My main research interests are in the political, social and cultural history of twentieth-century Britain. I have worked extensively on the national popular press in the decades after 1918, examining the ways in which newspapers both reflected and shaped British society and culture.

My first monograph explored press debates about femininity and masculinity in the inter-war period. My second book, Family Newspapers? Sex, Private Life and the British Popular Press 1918-1978 (OUP, 2009) explored the role of the press as a source of information and imagery about sex, morality and personal relationships.

With Professor Martin Conboy, I have written a wide-ranging history of popular newspapers, Tabloid Century: The Popular Press in Britain, 1896 to the Present (Peter Lang, 2015). I have also worked on the press coverage of child sexual abuse.

I am currently working on a project entitled ‘Everyday Politics, Ordinary Lives: Democratic Engagement in Britain, 1918-1992’, supported by an AHRC Leadership Fellowship (2017-18). This project investigates how British citizens understood politics and how they viewed its relationship to their lives, from 1918 to 1992.

I am co-Editor of the journal Gender and History, and Senior Associate of History & Policy.

Research interests

My main research interests are in the political, social and cultural history of twentieth-century Britain. I have worked extensively on the national popular press in the decades after 1918, examining the ways in which newspapers both reflected and shaped British society and culture. I have also worked on the press coverage of child sexual abuse. More recently, my research has focused on democratic engagement since 1918, exploring how British citizens understood politics and how they viewed its relationship to their lives.

I am currently working on a project entitled ‘Everyday Politics, Ordinary Lives: Democratic Engagement in Britain, 1918-1992’, supported by an AHRC Leadership Fellowship (2017-18). This project investigates how British citizens understood politics and how they viewed its relationship to their lives, from 1918 to 1992. It focuses on the everyday political opinions, discussions and interactions of ordinary British people in the period from the establishment of a near democracy with the Representation of the People Act 1918 (which gave the vote to all adult men and most women over 30) up until the transformation of British political culture with the emergence of 24-hour news channels and the internet in the early 1990s.

I am co-Editor of the journal Gender & History, and I am co-Series Editor, with Dr Mark Hampton, of Bloomsbury’s A Cultural History of Media 6-volume series.

In 2009 I founded, with Professor Conboy, the Centre for the Study of Journalism and History.

Please see the video below (as part of the department's Schools History Network) to see me talking about my research and using modern newspapers as sources.

Publications

Books

  • Bingham A & Conboy M (2015) Tabloid Century: The Popular Press in Britain, 1896 to the Present. Oxford: Peter Lang. RIS download Bibtex download
  • Bingham A (2009) Family Newspapers? Sex, Private Life, and the British Popular Press 1918-1978. Oxford: Oxford University Press. RIS download Bibtex download
  • Bingham A (2004) Gender, Modernity, and the Popular Press in Inter-war Britain. Oxford University Press. RIS download Bibtex download

Journal articles

Chapters

Book reviews

Research group

Research Supervision

I am keen to supervise postgraduate students working on the political, social and cultural history of modern Britain, particularly those with interests in the media and popular culture; gender, sexuality and class; and popular political engagement and social activism.

Current students:

  • Leo Bird - The British Comedy Industry: Prosperity and Decline in Live Comedy Performance, 1945-65.
  • Isabelle Carter - Streets in the Sky and Life in the ‘Sink’: Youth, Gender, and Experience on High-Rise Council Estates in Britain, 1961-1998.
  • Joseph Diviney - The 1984-5 Miners’ Strike and the Demise of the British Coal Mining Industry.
  • Alexander Noonan - Political Citizens? Democratic Engagement in a Polarised Britain, 1974-94.
  • Hallam Roffey - Offence, Obscene Material and the Boundaries of Acceptability in British Culture, c. 1960-2000.
  • Conner Scott - Propaganda for things as they are'? British newsreels in everyday life between c.1920-c.1939.

All current students

Completed students:

  • Aaron Ackerley - Economic Ideas in the Interwar British Daily Press.
  • Gareth Roddy - Into the West: The Literature of Travel in the Western Peripheries of the British-Irish Isles, c.1880-c.1940.
  • David Holland - Natives and Newcomers, Marriage and Belonging - South Asian migration, settlement and working-class tolerance in the Sheffield area during the early twentieth century.
  • Lucy Bell - From Co-operation to Confrontation: Trade Unionism, British Politics and the Media, 1945-1979.
  • Sarah Kenny - Unspectacular Youth? Evening Leisure Space and Youth Culture in Sheffield, c.1960-c.1989.
  • Ross Paulger (MPhil) - Anglo-American Quality Press Narratives and Sexual Revolution, 1958-1979.
  • Steve McKevitt - The persuasion industries in the UK and the inculcation of persuasion within British society from 1969 to 1997.
  • Lucy Brown - Encountering Each Other: Love and Emotional Relationships between Men and Women in Britain, 1950s-1970s.
  • Thomas Dowling - In Spite of History: New Leftism in Britain 1956-1979.
  • Patrick Glen - Morality in the Music Press, 1967-1983.
  • Helen Smith - A study of working-class men who desired other men in the north of England 1895-1957.
  • Sarah Rawlins - Modernity, Identity & Englishness in the Interwar Suburban Garden.
  • Laura King - Fatherhood and Masculinity in Britain, 1918-1960.

PhD study in History

Teaching activities

Undergraduate:

  • HST288 - Media and Popular Culture in Twentieth-Century Britain
  • HST3095/3096 - Permissive Britain? Social and Cultural Change, 1956-74

Postgraduate: 

  • HST6052 - Stories of Activism in Sheffield, 1960 to the Present
  • HST680 - Media and Political Culture in Modern Britain
Professional activities

Administrative roles:

  • Head of Department (2018-present).
  • Director of Graduate Studies (2015-17): This involves overseeing the postgraduate taught programmes and the postgraduate research supervision in the department, liaising with the postgraduate community, and supporting applications for MA and PhD funding.
  • Director of Learning and Teaching (2010-14): This involves overseeing the undergraduate taught programmes in the department, monitoring student feedback, ensuring the smooth running of quality assurance processes, and assessing the overall shape of teaching provision.
  • Allocations (2006-9): Overseeing the student module allocation process.
Public engagement

I have made significant interventions in public policy-making and media debates about historical child sexual abuse. My historical evidence to the NHS/ Department of Health enquiries into the activities of Jimmy Savile (delivered in 2013, with colleagues from History & Policy) was cited in four public reports on the Savile scandal in 2014-15: Kate Lampard’s Oversight Report (June 2014) and Lessons Learnt Report (Feb. 2015) and reports on Broadmoor Hospital (June 2014) and Stoke Mandeville Hospital (Feb. 2015). Working with Professor Louise Jackson, Dr Lucy Delap and Dr Louise Settle, I have written policy papers and media articles on the history of child sexual abuse, and given presentations to the Independent Police Complaints Commission (2016) and the St Mary’s Sexual Assault Referral Centre’s annual conference (2017).

I have also contributed to policy and media debates about press regulation. One of my articles was cited in Lord Justice Leveson’s report, An Inquiry into the Culture, Practices and Ethics of the Press (November 2012).

I am involved in the Stories of Activism project, which explore Sheffield's rich history of activism and collects campaign stories, memories and objects from 1960 to the present.

I am a Senior Associate of History & Policy, which works for better public policy through an understanding of history by connecting historians, policy makers and the media.

As part of the department's Schools History Network we contribute to local schools' teaching by holding events for local pupils and their teachers, introducing children to advances in historical knowledge, and enabling teachers to brush up on their scholarship concerning historical events. Staff have given talks to students at local schools, but we also hold events within the department to which local pupils and teachers are invited and schools have also offered placements for our MA students.

As part of the Schools History Network the department has made a series of videos for use in the classroom. Below is a short video of myself talking about using modern newspapers as sources.