Photo of Bob MooreProfessor Bob Moore

B.A., Ph.D. (Manc)

Professor of 20th Century European History

Netherlands; prisoner of war history; Holocaust

r.moore@sheffield.ac.uk

+44 (0)114 22 22565 | Jessop West 3.11

Semester Two 2018/19 Office Hours: Tuesdays 14:00-15:00 and Wednesdays 10:00-11:00 

Profile

Biography

Moore Refugees book cover largeBob Moore studied at the University of Manchester, graduating in 1976, and subsequently completed a PhD in 1983. Since then, he has held teaching posts at UMIST, North London Polytechnic, Manchester Polytechnic, Cambridgeshire College of Arts and Technology, Bristol Polytechnic and the Manchester Metropolitan University. He joined the University of Sheffield in 1999.

His research is in the field of twentieth century European history and in addition to his post at Sheffield he has held visiting fellowships at the Department of War Studies, Kings College London, the Center for Advanced Holocaust Study at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, the Université Libre de Bruxelles and the Institut d´Etudes Politique (Sciences Po) in Paris. He is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society and the Dutch Koninklijk Nederlands Historisch Genootschap. He has been a member of the academic advisory board for the Centre for Holocaust and Genocide Studies in Amsterdam and currently has a similar role for the Bijdragen en Mededelingen Betreffende de Geschiedenis der Nederlanden. He was also the co-editor of the Britain and the Netherlands Conference series from 2002 to 2009.

His teaching is primarily on the Holocaust and Twentieth Century European History at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels and he is currently working on a number of comparative European History projects.

Professional Roles

Fellow of the Royal Historical Society

Vice President, International Committee for the History of the Second World War

German History Society

British International Studies Association

British International History Group

Nederlands Historisch Genootschap

Research

Research

Moore Survivors book cover largeSince publishing a major study of the Nazi persecution of the Jews in the Netherlands in 1997, Bob Moore has edited a collection on civilian resistance to German occupation in World War II and co-written a monograph on Italian prisoners of war in the British Empire during World War II (with Kent Fedorowich, UWE, Bristol). More recently, he has completed other major collaborative projects on decolonisation, published in 2009 and on refugee policy in the 1930s, published in 2010. His latest monograph Survivors - on the rescue of Jews in Europe during World War II - was published by Oxford University Press in 2010. He is currently working on projects associated with the history of the Netherlands and with the repatriation and rehabilitation of prisoners-of-war after World War II.

His research interests include the Holocaust, with specific reference to Western Europe; the history of the Netherlands and its colonies; and prisoners of war in twentieth century conflicts.

Research Supervision

Please note that Bob is not available to supervise new PhD students.

Current students:

  • Hanna Abakunova - The Rescue of Jews and Roma in Ukraine during the Holocaust.
  • David Kann - Conflicts and Collaboration in the Relationship between the Joodsche Weekblad (Jewish Weekly), the Joodsche Raad (Jewish Council) and the Germans during the Persecution of the Jews in the Occupied Netherlands.
  • Laurien Vastenhout - The Jewish Councils of Western Europe under Nazi Occupation: A Comparative Analysis.

All current students by supervisor

Completed students include:

  • Andrew Chesworth - Planning and Realities: The Recovery of Britain's Far East Prisoners of War 1941 - 1945.
  • Mark Seddon - British and US intervention in the Venezuelan oil industry: A case study of Anglo-US relations 1941-1948.
  • Henning Pieper - The SS Cavalry Brigade and its operations in the Soviet Union 1941-1942.

PhD study in History

Publications

Full list of Publications

Books

Survivors: Jewish Self Help and Rescue in Nazi-Occupied Western Europe (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010)

Survivors book coverSurvivors: Jewish Self Help and Rescue in Nazi-Occupied Western Europe (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010)

Survivors is the first examination of how more than half of the Jews in Western Europe survived the Holocaust. The widely differing rates of Jewish mortality have long vexed historians, who have traditionally concentrated on explaining this problem through national studies or by using a comparative approach, concentrating on the role of perpetrators, victims, and circumstances. In contrast, Survivors emphasizes the factors that helped Jews to avoid deportation, either through escape or by going underground. Taken as a whole, this book provides the first comprehensive study of Jewish survival in Western Europe in all its forms.

Firstly, the book focuses on the escape routes used by Jews fleeing from the Nazis, and the disparate networks that ran them, including the routes from France into Spain and Switzerland, but also the lesser know history of the escape of Norwegian Jewry and the famous rescue from Denmark in 1943. Few of these networks were exclusively devoted to helping Jews - in fact, most of them helped all manner of people, including Allied aircrew, escaping Prisoners of War, and political opponents. Moreover, they were not exclusively the product of the Second World War - as Bob Moore shows, many had linkages with resistance in the First World War, and indeed to opposition to state power stretching back centuries.

The second half of the book is devoted to three national case studies (France, Belgium, and the Netherlands) that focus on the interrelationship between Jewish self-help and the individuals and organizations that assisted in hiding them, including the Christian churches. These case studies serve to highlight the very different circumstances and structures pertaining in these three countries and how this had a direct bearing on levels of survival. Separate chapters then deal with the case of child rescue and the motivations of those involved in this most contentious of issues. Finally, the spotlight is turned on cases where Jews were saved, either directly or indirectly, by the Nazis themselves - and on the vexed question of Jews who survived by collaborating with the arrest and deportation of their co-religionists.

Refugees from Nazi Germany and the Liberal European States, 1933-1939 (edited with Frank Caestecker) (Providence RI: Berghahn, 2010)

Refugees book coverRefugees from Nazi Germany and the Liberal European States, 1933-1939 (edited with Frank Caestecker) (Providence RI: Berghahn, 2010)

The exodus of refugees from Nazi Germany in the 1930s has received far more attention from historians, social scientists, and demographers than many other migrations and persecutions in Europe. However, as a result of the overwhelming attention that has been given to the Holocaust within the historiography of Europe and the Second World War, the issues surrounding the flight of people from Nazi Germany prior to 1939 have been seen as Vorgeschichte (pre-history), implicating the Western European democracies and the United States as bystanders only in the impending tragedy. Based on a comparative analysis of national case studies, this volume deals with the challenges that the pre-1939 movement of refugees from Germany and Austria posed to the immigration controls in the countries of interwar Europe. Although Europe takes center-stage, this volume also looks beyond, to the Middle East, Asia and America. This global perspective outlines the constraints under which European policy makers (and the refugees) had to make decisions. By also considering the social implications of policies that became increasingly protectionist and nationalistic, and bringing into focus the similarities and differences between European liberal states in admitting the refugees, it offers an important contribution to the wider field of research on political and administrative practices.

Catholic Communities in Protestant States, Britain and the Netherlands 1580-1720 (edited with Henk van Nierop, Judith Pollmann and Benjamin Kaplan) (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2009)

Bob Moore Catholic Communities in Protestant States book coverCatholic Communities in Protestant States, Britain and the Netherlands 1580-1720 (edited with Henk van Nierop, Judith Pollmann and Benjamin Kaplan) (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2009)

This volume is the first to compare the position of Catholic minorities in England and the Dutch Republic. Looking beyond the tales of persecution that have dominated traditional historiography, the contributors focus on the realities of Catholic existence. Thematically organised, the book explores Catholicism as a minority culture that resorted to unorthodox means, both to retain its own identity, and to survive in a hostile political environment. It examines ritual, material culture, international networks, and above all relations: between laity and clergy, men and women, Catholics and Protestants. Much of Baroque Europe was dominated religiously by the Roman Catholic Church, a Church Militant. Not so seventeenth-century England or the Dutch Republic, where Catholicism was a minority religion. In these two officially Protestant lands, Catholics practiced their faith in secret and were excluded from public life. Political pamphlets reviled them as a fifth column that plotted to bring foreign domination and overthrow the Protestant establishment. For Rome, meanwhile, England and the Dutch Republic became mission territories that proved difficult to staff and even more difficult to manage. By highlighting differences as well as similarities between the English and Dutch experiences, Catholic minorities in protestant states will help both undergraduate readers and specialists to rethink the history of Catholicism and the consequences of minority status for religious communities.

Crises of Empire. Decolonization and Europe´s Imperial States, 1918-1975 (with Martin Thomas and Larry Butler) (London: Hodder/Arnold, 2008) pp.xiii + 457 (ISBN 978 0340 731277)

Empire book coverCrises of Empire. Decolonization and Europe´s Imperial States, 1918-1975 (with Martin Thomas and Larry Butler) (London: Hodder/Arnold, 2008) pp.xiii + 457 (ISBN 978 0340 731277)

The book is relevant, timely and innovative. It addresses an important historic topic and synthesises the existing literature. The authors give empirical body to some of the questions that have been raised in recent years by the theorists of post colonial history and of global history while at the same time staying on firm ground by not neglecting the 'old fashioned' fields of diplomatic and economic history. Crises of Empire is essential reading for students of imperialism and comparative decolonization. It also offers new perspectives for those interested in contemporary European history, international politics, and the legacies of colonialism across the developing world. Written by subject specialists, it analyses the forces that precipitated the twentieth century collapse of all Europes late colonial empires. The fate of the British, French, and Dutch colonial empires is investigated individually and comparatively. So, too, is the bloody end to Belgian and Portuguese colonialism in black Africa. Ranging from the wave of European imperial expansion in the aftermath of World War I to the collapse of the last settler colonies in Africa during the 1960s and 1970s, the authors assess decolonization as a long-term process whose roots and outcomes transcended the Cold War. They draw attention to significant changes to the international system during the twentieth century as well as to shifting popular attitudes towards colonialism both within Europes imperial nation states and within individual colonies. They also discuss the economics of empire, focusing on such factors as changing global markets, colonial urbanization, and the growth of colonial organized labour. Above all, they consider the role of Africans and Asians as agents of colonial change, highlighting the parts played by anti-colonial movements, popular protest, and armed insurgency as catalysts of Europes imperial collapse.

Twentieth Century Mass Society in Britain and the Netherlands edited with Henk van Nierop. (Oxford: Berg, 2006). pp.xi+193 (ISBN 101845205251) Britain and the Netherlands XV

Moore Twentieth Century book coverTwentieth Century Mass Society in Britain and the Netherlands edited with Henk van Nierop. (Oxford: Berg, 2006). pp.xi+193 (ISBN 101845205251) Britain and the Netherlands XV

From the beginning of the nineteenth century, Western Europe witnessed the emergence of a 'mass' society. Grand social processes, such as urbanization, industrialization and democratization, blurred the previous sharp distinctions that had divided society. This massive transformation is central to our understanding of modern society.

Comparing the British and Dutch experience of mass society in the twentieth century, this book considers five major areas: politics, welfare, media, leisure and youth culture. In each section, two well-known specialists - one from each country - examine the conditions behind the rise of a mass society, and show how these conditions were distinctively British or Dutch. Drawing on history, cultural studies and sociology, the authors bring new insight into the development of modern European society.

Prisoners of War, Prisoners of Peace: Captivity, Homecoming and Memory in World War II edited with Barbara Hately-Broad (Oxford: Berg, 2005) pp. x + 270 (ISBN 1 845 20156 6)

Prisoners book coverPrisoners of War, Prisoners of Peace: Captivity, Homecoming and Memory in World War II edited with Barbara Hately-Broad (Oxford: Berg, 2005) pp. x + 270 (ISBN 1 845 20156 6)

Millions of servicemen of the belligerent powers were taken prisoner during World War II. Until recently, the popular image of these men has been framed by tales of heroic escape or immense suffering at the hands of malevolent captors. For the vast majority, however, the reality was very different. Their history, both during and after the War, has largely been ignored in the grand narratives of the conflict. This collection brings together new scholarship, largely based on sources from previously unavailable Eastern European or Japanese archives. Authors highlight a number of important comparatives. Whereas for the British and Americans held by the Germans and Japanese, the end of the war meant a swift repatriation and demobilization, for the Germans, it heralded the beginning of an imprisonment that, for some, lasted until 1956. These and many more moving stories are revealed here for the first time.

Colonial Empires Compared edited with Henk van Nierop (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2003) pp.ix+204 (ISBN 0 7546 0492 6). Britain and the Netherlands XIV

Colonial book coverColonial Empires Compared edited with Henk van Nierop (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2003) pp.ix+204 (ISBN 0 7546 0492 6). Britain and the Netherlands XIV

During the seventeenth century, the Dutch and English emerged as the world's leading trading nations, building their prosperity largely upon their maritime successes. During this period both nations strongly contested for maritime supremacy and colonial dominance, yet by the nineteenth century, it was Britain who had undoubtedly come out on top of this struggle, with a navy that dominated the seas and an empire of unparalleled size. This volume examines the colonial development of these two nations at a crucial period in which the foundations for the modern nineteenth and twentieth century imperial state were laid.

The volume consists of ten essays (five by British and five by Dutch scholars) based on papers originally delivered to the Fourteenth Anglo-Dutch Historical Conference, 2000. The essays are arranged into five themes which take a strongly comparative approach to explore the development of the British and Dutch colonial empires in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. These themes examine the nature of Anglo-Dutch relations, the culture of imperialism and perceptions of the overseas world, the role of sea power in imperial expansion, the economics of colonial expansion and the extension of the metropolitan state to the colonies. Taken together, these essays form an important collection which will greatly add to the understanding of the British and Dutch colonial empires, and their relative successes and failures.

The British Empire and its Italian Prisoners of War 1940-1947 with Kent Fedorowich (Basingstoke: Palgrave 2002) pp.xi+329 (ISBN 0 333 73892 6)

British Empire Book CoverThe British Empire and its Italian Prisoners of War 1940-1947 with Kent Fedorowich (Basingstoke: Palgrave 2002) pp.xi+329 (ISBN 0 333 73892 6)

During the Second World War, British and Imperial forces captured more than half a million Italian soldiers, sailors and airmen. Although a symbol of military success, these prisoners created a multitude of problems for the authorities throughout the war. This book looks at how the British addressed these problems and turned liabilities into assets by using the Italians as a labour force, a source of military intelligence and as a political warfare tool before their final repatriation in 1946-47.

Resistance in Western Europe Editor, (Oxford:Berg, 2000) pp.x+298 (ISBN 1 85973 274 7)

Resistance book coverResistance in Western Europe Editor, (Oxford:Berg, 2000) pp.x+298 (ISBN 1 85973 274 7)

This book is the first comprehensive survey of resistance movements in Western Europe in World War II. Until now, most work on resistance has centred either on espionage networks, partisans and their external links, or on comparisons between national movements and theories of resistance. This book fills a major gap in the existing literature by providing an analysis of individual national historiographies on resistance, the debates they have engendered and their relationship to more general discussions of the occupation and postwar reconstruction of the countries concerned. Explaining the context, underlying motivations and development of resistance, contributors analyze the variety of movements and organizations as well as the extent of individual acts against the occupying power within individual states. While charting the growth of resistance activity as the war turned against the Axis, this book will also deal with the roles of specific groups and the theories which have been put forward to explain their behaviour. This includes patterns of Jewish resistance and the participation of women in what has largely been considered a male sphere. The conclusion then provides a comparative synthesis, and relates the work of the contributors to existing theories on the subject as a whole.This book will not only be core reading on courses on the social or military history of World War II but also, more generally, all courses covering the social and political history of Western European states in the twentieth century.

Victims and Survivors: The Nazi Persecution of the Jews in the Netherlands, 1940-1945 (London: Arnold, 1997) pp.320 (ISBN 0340 49563 4). Dutch edition Slachtoffers en Overlevenden: De Nazi-vervolging van de Joden in Nederland 1940-1945 (Amsterdam: Prometheus, 1997) pp.392 (ISBN 90 351 1937 1)

Moore Victims and Survivors book coverVictims and Survivors: The Nazi Persecution of the Jews in the Netherlands, 1940-1945 (London: Arnold, 1997) pp.320 (ISBN 0340 49563 4). Dutch edition Slachtoffers en Overlevenden: De Nazi-vervolging van de Joden in Nederland 1940-1945 (Amsterdam: Prometheus, 1997) pp.392 (ISBN 90 351 1937 1)

"The Diary of Anne Frank" remains an icon of Holocaust literature, yet comparatively little is known about the wider circumstances in which the individual tragedy of the Frank family was played out. How was it possible that such a large proportion of the Netherlands' Jewish citizens fell victim to Nazi genocide, when those in France and Belgium fared markedly better? This study examines all the central elements of the debate: the nature of the Nazi persecutors, their victims and the specific circumstances of the German occupation of the Netherlands in an attempt to answer this question. The book also charts the development of Nazi policies in the Netherlands and their effects - on those who perished and on the few who managed to survive.

Prisoners of War and their Captors in World War II, Co-edited with Kent Fedorowich (Oxford: Berg Publishers, 1996) pp.ix + 312 (ISBN 1 85973 157 0)

Prisoner Captors book coverPrisoners of War and their Captors in World War II, Co-edited with Kent Fedorowich (Oxford: Berg Publishers, 1996) pp.ix + 312 (ISBN 1 85973 157 0)

During World War II, captured service personnel of all the belligerent powers found themselves incarcerated as prisoners of war. Although the number of POWs ran into the millions, comparatively little has been written about them. This timely collection examines individual prisoners' experiences, but also provides an overview and synthesis of some of the most heated debates in the field.Casting new light on the racial and ideological assumptions of captors, authors show how axis powers and the Japanese dealt with Black African and African American troops who were taken prisoner. Political considerations are shown to have proven weightier than, in many cases, heinous crimes against humanity. Also highlighted is the history of Italian POWs in allied hands, the treatment of axis prisoners in Britain and the complex story of Free and Vichy French servicemen fighting each other in Africa.This important book will be essential and compulsive reading for students and scholars of the Second World War and will signpost areas worthy of further inquiry for many years to come

Sources in European Political History Volume Three: War and Resistance, (London: Macmillan, 1991) with Chris Cook, Tim Kirk and Hilary Rubinstein, pp.xiv+176 (ISBN 0333-42369-0)
Sources in European Political History Volume Two: Diplomacy and International Affairs, (London: Macmillan, 1989) with Chris Cook and Tim Kirk, pp.xii+190 (ISBN 0333-27775-9)

Moore Sources book coverSources in European Political History Volume Two: Diplomacy and International Affairs, (London: Macmillan, 1989) with Chris Cook and Tim Kirk, pp.xii+190 (ISBN 0333-27775-9)

This publication constitutes the second volume in the widely-acclaimed Sources in European Political History. This latest volume provides a wide-ranging guide to the surviving private papers of over one thousand statesman, politicians and diplomats who played a part in the shaping of modern Europe.

Refugees from Nazi Germany in the Netherlands, 1933 40, (IISG/Nijhoff:Dordrecht, 1986).

Moore Refugees from Nazi Germany in the Netherlands book coverRefugees from Nazi Germany in the Netherlands, 1933-40, (IISG/Nijhoff:Dordrecht, 1986).

Recent Book Chapters

‘Idle Women: Challenging Gender Stereotypes on Britain’s Inland Waterways during the Second World War’ (with Barbara Hately) in: M.Andrews and J.Lomas (eds.) The Home Front in Britain: Images, Myths and Forgotten Experiences since 1914 (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2014) ,pp.201-216 (ISBN 978-1-137-34898-2)

‘Integrating Self-Help into the History of Jewish Survival in Western Europe’ in: Norman J.W. Goda (ed) Jewish Histories of the Holocaust: New Transnational Approaches (New York/Oxford: Berghahn, 2014) pp.193-208 (ISBN 978 1782384410)

‘The Vagaries of Memorialisation’ in: Nick Mansfield (ed) The Great War and the North West, Manchester Region History Review 24 (2013) pp. 79-84 (with Liz Moore) (ISSN 0952-4320 ISBN 978-1-85936-226-6)

‘Holocaust, krig og besættelse i Vesteuropa’ in: Cecilia Felicia Stockholm Bank and Ander Jerichow (red.) Holocaust og civilamfundets reaction (Odense: Syddansk Universitetsforlag, 2013) pp.15-30 (ISBN 978-87-7674757-2) reprinted in Idem, ‘The Holocaust, War and Occupation in Western Europe’ in: Civil Society and the Holocaust: International Perspectives on Resistance and Rescue (New York: Humanity in Action, 2013), pp.109-123. (ISBN 978-87-9964971-6)

‘Perceptions brittaniques des prisonniers des puissance de l’Axe en Grande-Bretagne, 1939-1947’ in: Anne-Marie Pathé et Fabien Théofilakis (eds.) La Captivité de Guerre au XXe Siècle. Des Archives, Des Histoires, Des Mémoires (Paris: Armand Colin/Ministère de la Défense, 2012) pp.174-184 (ISBN 978-2-200-28044-4)

‘Niederlande: Anpassung-Opposition-Widerstand’ in: Gerd R. Ueberschär (ed.) Handbuch zum Widerstand gegen Nationalsozialismus und Faschismus in Europa 1933/39 bis 1945 (Berlin/New York: De Gruyter, 2011) pp.111-123 (ISBN978-3-598-11767-1)

‘The Treatment of Prisoners of War in the Western European Theatre of War 1939-1945’ in Sibylle Scheipers (ed.) Prisoners in War (Oxford: OUP, 2010) pp.111-126 (ISBN 978 019 957757-6)

‘The Netherlands’ in Richard Bosworth (ed.) The Oxford Handbook of Fascism (Oxford: O.U.P., 2009) pp.452-468 (ISBN 978 019 929131-1)


Recent Journal Articles

‘Enforced Diaspora: The Fate of Italian Prisoners of War during the Second World War’ War in History XXIV/2 (2015) pp.174-190 (ISSN 0968-3445)

‘ɸAƜИ3М НИДЕРЛАНДϹКИX 3ЕМЛЯX (1919-1945)’ БЕРЕГИНЯ Vol. 32/4 (2014) pp. 341-351 (ISSN 2077-6365)

‘Captive Audience: Camp Entertainment and British Prisoners-of-War in German Captivity, 1939-1945’ Popular Entertainment Studies V/1 (2014) pp.58-73 (with Barbara Hately) (ISSN 1837-9303)

‘Illicit Encounters: Female Civilian Fraternization with Axis Prisoners-of-War in Second World War Britain’ Journal of Contemporary History XLVIII/4 (2013) pp.742-760 (ISSN 0022-0094)

‘The War That Won’t Go Away’ BMGN Low Countries Historical Review 128/2 (2013) pp.73-80. (ISSN 2211-2898)

‘Jewish Self-Help and Rescue in the Netherlands during the Holocaust in Comparative Perspective’ Tijdschrift voor Geschiedenis CXXIV/4 (2012) pp.492-505.

‘Female Domestic Servants as Desirable Refugees: Gender, Labour Needs and Immigration Policy in Belgium, the Netherlands and Great Britain.’ (with Frank Caestecker) European History Quarterly XLI, (May 2011) pp.1-18 (ISSN 0014-3111)

Teaching

Module Leader

European Fascism, HST223 (Level 2 Option module)

European Fascism, HST223

The course begins by examining the origins and development of fascism in the twentieth century, from its intellectual origins before the First World War through to its development as a political movement in power led by Mussolini in Italy. It then looks at other examples of fascism in the interwar period, most notably German and Austrian National Socialism before tracing the continued existence of fascist-orientated movements in the postwar era. Students will be encouraged to look at the various explanations for the success of fascism in particular circumstances and also to examine the various theories put forward to define it as a political and social phenomenon. The course can be linked to a course assignment and there is a wealth of available secondary source material on most of the topics covered by the teaching programme. However, students should be aware that this abundance of sources requires an emphasis on detailed research and critical reading to discriminate between the important works on the subject and those of lesser value.

The Holocaust: The Destruction of European Jewry, HST386/387 (Level 3 Special Subject module)

The Holocaust: The Destruction of European Jewry, HST386/387

The aim of this module is to introduce students to the various debates on the origins and execution of the 'final solution' in Nazi occupied Europe during the Second World War. On completion of this module, students will have attained and demonstrated a satisfactory level of competence in the following areas. Firstly, an understanding of the main elements of holocaust history and a familiarity with the different methodological and historiographical debates engendered by historians over the last fifty years to explain the 'final solution'. Secondly, an ability to evaluate primary source material from the period (in translation), including film evidence where appropriate.

Prisoners of War in the Twentieth Century, HST692 (Postgraduate module)

Prisoners of War in the Twentieth Century, HST692

The major conflicts of the twentieth century saw millions of servicemen taken prisoner. Many succumbed to ill-treatment and starvation and many others were held in captivity often for many years after hostilities were over. This module provides a methodological and contextual introduction to the topic by comparing the internal economic, political and social factors that determined the belligerent powers’ treatment of prisoners, as well as reflecting on prisoners’ experiences through memoir material. It will also draw on the cognate discipline of international law in examining the role of international conventions in protecting prisoners, both in Europe and the wider world.

Public Engagement

Public Engagement

To follow

In The Media

To follow

Administrative Duties

Administrative Duties

Senior Admissions Tutor (2013-2016)

Acting Head of Department (2009-2011)

Departmental Executive Board

Faculty of Arts Graduate Studies Committee (2005-2007)

Senate (2009-2011)

Faculty Executive Board (2009-2011)