Lucy Brown profile pictureDr Lucy Brown

B.A. (Sheffield), M.A. (Sheffield), Ph.D. (Sheffield)

Teaching Associate in Modern British History

20th century British social and cultural history; popular culture; history of emotion; psychology;
health; marriage, personal relationships and the family; gender and sexuality

lucy.brown@sheffield.ac.uk

+44 (0)114 22 22605 | Jessop West 1.06

Semester Two 2018/19 Office Hours: Thursdays 11:00-13:00

Profile

Biography

Lucy completed her BA, MA and PhD in the History department at Sheffield. Her main research interests are in the social and cultural history of twentieth-century Britain, in particular the social and cultural changes of the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. She is interested in the history of popular psychology, ideas about emotional expression, emotional relationships and emotional health, and the development of a ‘confessional’ and ‘therapeutic’ culture in modern Britain. Her research has focused on changing ideas about marriage and personal relationships in the 1960s and 1970s as a case study to explore a broader shift in British culture during this period towards transparency, honesty and authenticity. Lucy also has interests in the history of the welfare state in Britain as well as the history of mental health.

Research

Research

Lucy’s research explores the influence of psychological concepts on popular understandings of healthy emotional life, emotional relationships and emotional expression in Britain from the 1950s to the 1970s. She is particularly interested in the history of attitudes to honesty, openness and self-disclosure. Her PhD thesis entitled ‘Encountering Each Other: Love and Emotional Relationships between Men and Women in Britain, 1950s-1970s’ examined the overhauling of British models of marriage and personal relationships in the 1960s and 1970s towards an emphasis on transparency, generated by the popularisation of new psychological theories encouraging honest, authentic and spontaneous emotional expression. These included John Bowlby’s theory of ‘attachment’ and humanistic psychology’s theory of ‘encountering’.

Publications

Publications

To follow

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Teaching

Module Leader

HST288: Media and Popular Culture in Twentieth-Century Britain

This module will explore the ways in which the press, the cinema, and radio and television broadcasting shaped politics, society and culture in twentieth century Britain. The first half of the module will examine the historical development of each of the major media forms and discuss the different types of content that they provided. The second half will explore a number of key issues, such as the impact of the media on the evolution of modern democracy, the media´s role in reflecting and shaping identities such as class, gender and ethnicity, and the media's contribution to the emergence of a consumer society.

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HST3095/3096: Permissive Britain? Social and Cultural Change, 1956-74

This module will enable you to explore modern political and social activism by studying specific campaigns in Sheffield and beyond. You will get the opportunity to draw upon the material deposited in the ever-growing Stories of Activism archive (including oral history interviews, campaign materials and organisational records), as well as other sources, including the local press, to learn about this often untold side of Sheffield's history. Potential areas of study include trade unionism, employment and labour rights; women's issues, environmentalism, community-building; and peace, refugees and human rights. You will learn how to analyse local activism using perspectives from the broader literature on democratic culture and social movements.

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HST6052: Stories of Activism, 1960 to the Present

The Cold War significantly changed the parameters of international politics and shifted the balance of power in international relations. As a major international player and an imperial power, Britain was especially affected by these changes. Yet the Cold War was more than a diplomatic conflict. It also had a profound impact on British society and culture.

By encouraging you to bring together diplomatic, social and cultural history, this module examines the ways in which British policy-makers and British society slowly adapted to these changes in the key period from the end of the Second World War to the beginning of the Korean War. A variety of primary sources, ranging from diplomatic records to audio-visual sources and popular literature will be consulted.

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Lecturer

HST119: The Transformation of Britain, 1800 to the present

This module explores the central political, social, economic, cultural and diplomatic developments that have transformed Britain since 1800. Unlike most of its European neighbours, Britain did not experience dramatic moments of revolution, constitution-building, invasion or military defeat; indeed the belief that the nation was set on a course of gradual evolutionary progress was central to many versions of British identity. This course examines how, when and why change occurred in Britain. Key themes include the transition to mass democracy; the impact of industrialisation; shifts in social relationships based on class, gender and ethnicity; and the rise and fall of Britain as an imperial power.

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HST202: Historians and History

This module introduces students to some of the most influential and significant developments which have shaped the ways in which historians think about and write about the past. Since History became professionalised as a specific academic discipline in the nineteenth century, historians have adopted a variety of different approaches to their studies. For some, ideas about the past have been shaped by political beliefs, by the application of political ideologies and philosophies, and by the desire to produce a more inclusive version of history, focusing on the experience of the working classes, women, and groups marginalised in established accounts. Others have been influenced by different methods of research, and the opportunities offered by particular types of source material to tell different stories about the past. Others still have been inspired by intellectual theories and by borrowings from other disciplines, like literary studies and anthropology, to explore new ways of thinking about history. The module allows students to think more about the different ways in which we can study History, and to engage with the work of a number of historians whose influence can still be felt today.

It aims to equip students with the necessary background to develop a more critical approach to the secondary literature which they encounter throughout their degree course and to build bridges between the various modules they are studying at levels 2 and 3.

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HST2037: The Welfare State in Britain, 1900-2015

Although 1948 is remembered as the birth of the British welfare state, the involvement of the government in the wellbeing of its citizens has a far longer history. In this unit, we will explore the gradual evolution of British welfare practice and policy from 1900 until the present day. Drawing on primary sources including newspaper reports, documentary film and television, diaries, memoirs, charity records, and local government sources, we will analyze the shifting relationship between citizens and the state in modern Britain. We will examine how debates about class, gender, race and immigration informed the nature and extent of welfare provision over the past hundred years. In doing so, we will set the birth, growth and decline of the British welfare state alongside debates about the nature of citizenship in modern Britain.

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Public Engagement

Public Engagement

To follow.

In The Media

To follow.

Administrative Duties

Current Administrative Duties

To follow.