Activities and Events

Picture of data visualisation event

The Social Mediascape of Transnational Korean Popular Culture

Image of Korean pop cultureDal Yong Jin, Professor in the School of Communication, Simon Fraser University

31st January 2018
5pm- 6.15 pm
Lecture Theatre 6, The Diamond (followed by drinks reception)

The new Korean Wave, referring to the rapid growth of local popular culture and its global penetration, starting in the late 2000s appears to be more intensive in its popularity. The new Korean Wave means the circulation of local popular culture, not only television programs and films but also K-pop and digital games, as well as animation, with the help of social media. The social media-driven new Korean Wave has aptly adjusted to global fans’ tastes in both production and consumption as Korean cultural producers have timely developed their popular culture reflecting the era of social media. In this presentation, I explore the ways in which the Hallyu phenomenon is integrated into a social media-embedded cultural landscape in the global cultural markets.

Dal Yong In will discuss the recent developments characterising the Korean Wave in tandem with the cultural industries in the age of social media. He explains the increasing role of social media and changing media consumption habits among global youth. Finally, he will map out why social media has contributed to the enhanced popularity of the transnational media culture produced in a non-Western region.

Bibliography

Professor Dal Yong Jin Jin has published 11 books and penned more than 100 articles and chapters on media in East Asia and is one of the leading voices in the field. He has delivered numerous keynote speeches, conference presentations, invited lectures, and media interviews on subjects such monograph studies such as Smartland Korea, Module Gaming in Asia and Digital Platforms, Imperialism and Political Culture and the special Journal editions he has edited for journals such as Media, Culture and Society, Pacific Affairs and Asiascape: Digital Asia have helped to establish English language scholarship on digital Asia.

This event is organised by the Digital Society Network, in association with the School of East Asian Studies.

Image of Phoebe MooreThe Quantified Self in Precarity

Dr Phoebe Moore, Leicester University (from January 2018)

6th March 2018
4.30 – 6pm
Management School Boardroom

Humans are accustomed to being tool bearers, but what happens when machines become tool bearers, where the tool is seemingly ever more precise in its calculation about human labour via the use of big data and people analytics by metrics? Data, as quantified output, is treated as a neutral arbiter and judge, and is being prioritised over qualitative judgements in ‘agile’ key performance indicator management systems and digitalised client based relationships. From insecure ‘gig’ work to workplace health and wellness initiatives in office work, which include sensory tracking devices, digitalisation is not an inevitable process. Nor is it one that necessarily improves working conditions. Instead, workplace quantification leads to high turnover rates, workplace rationalisation and worker stress and anxiety. Indeed, before too long it will be possible for employers to quite literally track our blood, sweat and tears. These issues are linked to increased rates of precarity both objective and subjective. Scientific management asked us to be efficient. Now, we are asked to be agile. What will this mean for the everyday lives we lead?

Dr Phoebe Moore is Senior Lecturer in the Law & Politics department, Middlesex University London and will be an Associate Professor in the Division of Management and Organisation at Leicester University (January 2018). She writes about technology, production, work and governance. Her latest books are The Quantified Self in Precarity: Work, Technology and What Counts (Routledge 2017) and the edited collection Humans and Machines at Work: Monitoring, Surveillance and Automation in Contemporary Capitalism (Palgrave 2017).

ESRC Big Data, Employee Health & Well-being Seminar Series (supported by DSN)

Exploring the potential to assess the health and well-being of staff (and their organization more generally) via the vast amounts of digital data that is collected on their work practices and IT use.

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Big Data and Journalist Safety

A networking event to bring established external Centre for Freedom of the Media (CFOM) contacts and potential external contacts to the University of Sheffield to discuss and promote collaboration between researchers, representatives from NGOs, UNESCO and journalism in order to develop an interdisciplinary large scale, further details to be confirmed research funding application.

Identity and movement across Europe, 1945 to the present day

Journalistic representations of the movement of peoples within and across Europe from WWII to the present and ways to improve accessibility to these representations using digital technologies: scoping activities.

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