Staff (Moses profile)Dr Julia Moses

B.A. (Barnard/Columbia), M.Phil. (Oxon.), Ph.D. (Cantab.)

Senior Lecturer in Modern History

19th & 20th-century Britain, Germany and Italy; social policy; legal history

j.moses@sheffield.ac.uk

+44 (0)114 22 22612 | Jessop West 1.06

Office hours: On Research Leave 2017/18

Profile

Biography

Julia Moses studied at Barnard College/Columbia University (New York), Oxford and Cambridge (as a Gates Scholar). Before joining the Department of History at Sheffield in September 2011, she was a lecturer at Pembroke and Brasenose Colleges, Oxford. She has been a visiting scholar at the Berlin Collegium for the Comparative History of Europe at the Free University; a professeur invitée at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris; an International Guest Lecturer at the University of Bielefeld; and, a Research Associate at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin.

Her main research interests lie in the history of social problems and policy in Western Europe, with a particular focus on Britain, Germany and Italy in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. She has published on three main strands of her research: the history of private law, and especially torts; transnational history; and, the history of ideas about ‘risk’. She is especially keen to bridge disciplinary boundaries, and her work draws on insights from law, anthropology, politics and sociology. She is a co-chair of the Council for European Studies research network on Political Economy and Welfare and co-convenor of the Risk, Policy and Law research cluster in the Centre for Medical Humanities at Sheffield.

Professional Roles

Network Co-Chair, Council for European Studies

Co-Convenor, Risk, Policy and Law research cluster, Centre for Medical Humanities, University of Sheffield

Co-Director, Nineteenth-Century Studies Centre, University of Sheffield

PI, AHRC - funded​ research ​project 'Marriage and the State in Imperial Germany​​'

External Examiner (Modern Europe), University of Bristol BA ​in History​

External Examiner, Modern History MA and Nineteenth-Century Studies MA, King’s College, London

Fellow, Higher Education Academy

Research

Research

Julia Moses’ research focuses on European welfare policy, conceptions of risk, administrative practices and the roles of legal and scientific expertise in policy-making in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. She is especially interested in why particular issues come to be seen as social, rather than individual, problems in particular contexts, and she has sought to shed light on the important connections in this regard between social policy, the law and transnational flows of ideas and practices.

Julia is currently completing a monograph on workplace accidents, changing conceptions of risk and responsibility and the origins of modern European welfare policy. She is also working on three further projects. The first is a book-length study on the relationship between legal, social-scientific and confessional discourses about marriage and policies on the family in the German Empire, which places developments in Germany within a comparative and transnational context. Research for the project has been generously funded by an AHRC Fellowship (see: http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/history/research/projects/marriage-and-the-state). She is also continuing research towards an intellectual biography of T. H. Marshall as well as a comparative and connective study of governmental administration in modern Europe.

Research Supervision

Julia is keen to supervise students in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century European (including British) history, in particular the history of social problems and policy, government and bureaucracy, legal history, marriage and the family and social-scientific expertise.

Current Research Students

Kate Adkins - Body Shame, Stigma and Disgust in Modern Britain.

Lucy Huggins - Old Bailey Convicts at the Digital Panopticon Project.

Brendan Murphy - Killing in the German Army: Organizing and Surviving Combat in the Great War.

Further information on research opportunities within the department.

Publications

Full list of Publications

Books

The First Modern Risk: Workplace Accidents and the Origins of European Welfare States (forthcoming).

The First Modern Risk: Workplace Accidents and the Origins of European Welfare States (forthcoming)

This book examines the role of government in framing particular risks as ‘social problems’. Focusing on Britain, Germany and Italy in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, it traces how conceptions of risk changed over time, with important consequences for the relations between states and citizens and the role of government in everyday life. A comparative and connective study, this book transcends disciplinary boundaries, linking legal history, political history, social history and the history of science and technology with insights from politics and sociology.

(co-editor with Michael Lobban), The Impact of Ideas on Legal Development (Comparative Studies in the Development of the Law of Torts in Europe; Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012; paperback edn, 2014).

(co-editor with Michael Lobban), The Impact of Ideas on Legal Development (Comparative Studies in the Development of the Law of Torts in Europe; Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012; paperback edn, 2014).

This collection forms part of a three-volume set that contains the results of the second and final stage of an AHRC-funded project which aims to examine the nature of legal development in Western Europe since 1850, focusing on liability for fault. By bringing together experts with different disciplinary backgrounds – comparative lawyers and legal historians, all with an understanding of modern tort law in their own systems – and getting them to work collaboratively, the books in this series produce a more nuanced comparative legal history and one which is theoretically better informed.

Journal Theme Issues

Ed. (with Eve Rosenhaft), ‘Risk, Security and the Social in Twentieth-Century Europe’, special issue in Social Science History (forthcoming, 2015)

Ed. (with Eve Rosenhaft), ‘Risk, Security and the Social in Twentieth-Century Europe’, special issue in Social Science History (forthcoming, 2015)

This collection investigates how states and agencies close to them have perceived ‘risks’ and tried to manage them over the course of the twentieth century. It highlights domestic social and economic issues, ranging from public health and pensions to planning for economic growth and stability, as areas for state-driven and international initiatives in risk management.

Ed. (with Martin Daunton), ‘Social Policy across Borders’, special issue in the Journal of Global History 9/2 (July 2014)

Ed. (with Martin Daunton), ‘Social Policy across Borders’, special issue in the Journal of Global History 9/2 (July 2014)

This collection calls for a global perspective on the history of social policy. It suggests that, from the middle of the nineteenth century, diverse forms of connection brought new understandings of ‘social problems’ across local, regional and national borders.

Journal Articles

‘La (re)découverte du risque professionnel: l’indeminsation des ouvriers britanniques dans la perspective d’une histoire croisée, vers 1850-1900’, Le Mouvement Social 2014/4 (2014), pp. 187-204 [‘The (Re-)discovery of Occupational Risk: the compensation of British workers from the perspective of an Histoire Croisée, ca. 1850-1900’].

‘La (re)découverte du risque professionnel: l’indeminsation des ouvriers britanniques dans la perspective d’une histoire croisée, vers 1850-1900’, Le Mouvement Social 2014/4 (2014), pp. 187-204 [‘The (Re-)discovery of Occupational Risk: the compensation of British workers from the perspective of an Histoire Croisée, ca. 1850-1900’].

This article reflects on how Britain, the ‘first industrial nation’, dealt with the question of 'occupational risk'. It argues that ideas about risk were open to constant reinterpretation, and questions about blame and responsibility always remained in view.

‘Foreign Workers and the Emergence of Minimum International Standards for the Compensation of Workplace Accidents, 1880-1914’, Journal of Modern European History, 7, no. 2 (summer 2009), 219-239.

‘Foreign Workers and the Emergence of Minimum International Standards for the Compensation of Workplace Accidents, 1880-1914’, Journal of Modern European History, 7, no. 2 (summer 2009), 219-239.

This article shows how labour migration and the existence of overseas protectorates and colonies fostered international standards for compensation in the years leading up to the founding of the International Labour Organisation. It reveals how observations and communication across borders went hand in hand with the strengthening of explicitly national social-security systems.

‘Accidents at Work, Security and Compensation in industrialising Europe: The Cases of Britain, Germany and Italy, 1870-1925’, Annual Review of Law and Ethics, 17 (summer 2009), 237-258.

‘Accidents at Work, Security and Compensation in industrialising Europe: The Cases of Britain, Germany and Italy, 1870-1925’, Annual Review of Law and Ethics, 17 (summer 2009), 237-258.

This article offers historical insight into the development of modern conceptions of ‘compensation’, based on a range of expectations about the roles of the state and the law, by examining a key episode in its genealogy: the first laws for the compensation of industrial accidents.

Chapters

‘Policy Communities and Exchanges across Borders: The Case of Workplace Accidents at the Turn of the Twentieth Century’, in Davide Rodogno, Bernhard Struck and Jakob Vogel, eds., Shaping the Transnational Sphere, 1830-1950 (New York/Oxford: Berghahn, 2014; in press).

‘Policy Communities and Exchanges across Borders: The Case of Workplace Accidents at the Turn of the Twentieth Century’, in Davide Rodogno, Bernhard Struck and Jakob Vogel, eds., Shaping the Transnational Sphere, 1830-1950 (New York/Oxford: Berghahn, 2014; in press).

This article explores how the workplace, and, in particular, accidents at work and industrial hygiene, prompted an efflorescence of interconnected transnational networks in the period from the late 1880s to the 1910s. By focusing on these transnational and international epistemic communites, this article reveals the tensions between ‘expert knowledge’ and national politics.

‘Contesting Risk: Specialist Knowledge and Workplace Accidents in Britain, Germany and Italy, 1870-1920’, in Kerstin Brückweh, Dirk Schumann, Richard Wetzell and Benjamin Ziemann, eds., Engineering Society: The Scientification of the Social in Comparative Perspective, 1880-1990 (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2012).

‘Contesting Risk: Specialist Knowledge and Workplace Accidents in Britain, Germany and Italy, 1870-1920’, in Kerstin Brückweh, Dirk Schumann, Richard Wetzell and Benjamin Ziemann, eds., Engineering Society: The Scientification of the Social in Comparative Perspective, 1880-1990 (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2012).

By focusing on the case of workplace accidents, this article reveals how specialist knowledge remains contested and dynamic when addressing social issues.

Teaching

Module Leader

Politics, Culture and National Identity in Britain, 1867-1918, HST248 (Level 2 module)

Politics, Culture and National Identity in Britain, 1867-1918, HST248

Between 1867 and the First World War, new political parties and civil associations were formed across Britain, like across much of Europe, to make government by the people a lasting reality. This module examines the nature of these democratic cultures by focusing on Britain in a European context. In particular, it examines the relationship between modes of civic engagement and conceptions of national identity, exploring how Britons’ views of democracy were intimately linked to their experiences with and understandings of broader European and global developments.

Culture Wars: Nationalism, Religion and Violence in Europe, 1870-1918 HST2040 (Level 2 Module)

Culture Wars: Nationalism, Religion and Violence in Europe, 1870-1918, HST2040

Between 1870 and 1918, Europe witnessed the rise of popular nationalism, new nation states, and violent clashes over 'national culture', ethnic minorities and religion. It also saw the fall of its three multiethnic land empires. This module explores a variety of case studies in order to analyse the nature and signficance of these 'culture wars' about national belonging and (in)difference, including Germany's Kulturkampf against Catholics in the 1870s; French anticlericalism in the 1880s; claims of Jewish infanticide in German villages in the 1890s; anti-semitism in Vienna in the 1900s; and, demands for secularism in the Ottoman Empire in the 1910s.

Britain’s Social Revolution: Welfare, State and Society, c. 1870-1914, HST3122/3123 (Level 3 module)

Britain’s Social Revolution: Welfare, State and Society, c. 1870-1914, HST3122/3123

This module introduces students to the powerful debates about and important reforms targeted at a variety of ‘social questions’ which haunted Britain from the late nineteenth century until the outbreak of the First World War. It demonstrates how new forms of knowledge, ideas about social solidarity and political and social movements shaped how Britons addressed issues such as poverty, unemployment and public hygiene. By analysing a wide variety of primary sources, including visual sources, this module will examine competing visions about the future of the nation and, in particular, what role the state should play in determining that future.

Debt, Money and Morality, HST3304 (Level 3 comparative module)

Debt, Money and Morality, HST3304

This unit aims to develops students’ ability and confidence in formulating analyses of conceptions and cultures of debt and money across a significant period of time. The module combines interdisciplinary and comparative approaches in case studies of different early modern and modern national/geographic contexts at an advanced level. Topics include the nature of money, ethics of debt, markets, trust, and financial institutions.

Policing the Family: Welfare, Eugenics and Love in Early 20th Century Britain, HST6049 (Postgraduate module)

Policing the Family: Welfare, Eugenics and Love in Early 20th Century Britain, HST6049

This module explores key themes in the history of the family in Britain at the end of the nineteenth and the beginning of the twentieth centuries from a variety of perspectives. It aims to show how the family became a site for political arguments about 'modernity', societal degeneration and hopes for the future at the fin-de-siècle. It draws on a wide range of recent historiography as well as sociological literature, and examines a range of sources including anthropological, sociological and legal material as well as literary fiction from the period. Seminar themes will include: (1) Political arguments about the family; (2) Love and divorce (3) Love and homosexuality; (4) Infant mortality and birth rates (5) Eugenics.

Public Engagement

Public Engagement

Julia Moses is the principal investigator for the Marriage and the State in Imperial Germany research project. As part of this project she organised a conference entitled Ties that Bind: Marriage, Cultural Norms and the Law, c. 1750 to the present in October 2013, and she will take part in a public roundtable in October 2014 with History & Policy on ‘Marriage and Gay Rights: Contemporary Debates in Historical Perspective’.

Julia gives public lectures related to her research at Museums Sheffield, and she has co-organised a public roundtable in Sheffield on ‘The Ethics of Work’ as part of the Faculty of Arts and Humanities’ Art of Work series. Julia has also given a public lecture in Paris on the history of the welfare state in Britain, and she has participated in public roundtables and podcasts recorded in Paris, Bielefeld and Oxford.

As part of the Department’s commitment to promoting the study of History at all levels, Julia has presented to A-level teachers and representatives of OFSTED. She has also presented on her research to school groups through Sheffield’s Talking Heads programme.

In The Media

To follow

Administrative Duties

Administrative Duties

Level 3 Tutor

Pathway Leader for Social History, ESRC White Rose Doctoral Training Centre

Admissions Team, History

Member, Research Committee