Moses_Profile_PicDr Julia Moses

B.A. (Barnard/Columbia), M.Phil. (Oxon.), Ph.D. (Cantab.)

Senior Lecturer in Modern History

19th & 20th-century Britain, Germany and Italy; social policy; legal history

j.moses@sheffield.ac.uk

+44 (0)114 22 22612 | Jessop West 1.06

On Research Leave 2018/19

Profile

Biography

Julia Moses studied at Barnard College/Columbia University (New York), Oxford and Cambridge (as a Gates Scholar). Before joining the Department of History at Sheffield in September 2011, she was a lecturer at Pembroke and Brasenose Colleges, Oxford. She has been a visiting scholar at the Berlin Collegium for the Comparative History of Europe at the Free University; a professeur invitée at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris; an International Guest Lecturer at the University of Bielefeld; a Research Associate at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin; and, a Marie Curie Fellow at the Institute of Sociology at the University of Göttingen.

Grants and Awards

European Commission/Horizon 2020 Marie Curie Individual Fellowship (2016-2019)

Leverhulme International Academic Fellowship (2017-2018; declined)

DAAD Research Stay (2016)

AHRC Early Career Fellowship (2013)

Leverhulme Early Career Fellowship (2011-14; declined)

Prince Consort and Thirlwall Prize Studentship, Cambridge (2007-2008)

Gates Cambridge Trust Scholarship (2004-2008)

DAAD Scholarship (2005)

Overseas Research Studentship (2003-4; 2005-7)

Phi Beta Kappa (2000)

Professional Membership and Service

Member, Executive Committee, Council for European Studies

Member, Scientific Committee, International Commission on Occupational Health, triennial history conferences

Co-Chair, Political Economy and Welfare Research Network, Council for European Studies

Co-Convenor, Risk, Policy and Law research cluster, Centre for Medical Humanities, University of Sheffield

Co-Director, Nineteenth-Century Studies Centre, University of Sheffield (2011-16)

Fellow, Higher Education Academy

Research

Research

Julia Moses’ work analyses the relationship between government, law and civil society in Western Europe in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. It stands at the intersection of history, politics, sociology and law. She has especially sought to understand recent issues from historical comparative and transnational perspectives. These interests have led to investigations of the welfare state and ideas about risk; private law on the family and torts; and, the global diffusion of legal and social norms.

She is currently completing a book titled Civilizing Marriage: Family, Nation and State in the German Empire. This study, which has been generously funded by the Marie Curie Fellowship scheme of the European Commission, an AHRC Early Career Fellowship and a DAAD Research Stay, investigates dynamics of religious and cultural diversity in the German Empire in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by focusing on the legal and administrative treatment of marriage and the family. Combining history and sociology, her research sheds historical light on recent European debates about global migration, human rights and legal pluralism. A related book, Marriage Law and Modernity: Global Histories (Bloomsbury, 2017) and special issue of The History of the Family (forthcoming, 2019) on intermarriage have also stemmed from this research.

Julia has recently published The First Modern Risk: Workplace Accidents and the Origins of European Social States (Cambridge University Press, 2018). The comparative study charts the changing conceptions of risk and responsibility that lay at the origins of modern European welfare policy. A related book, The Impact of Ideas on Legal Development (co-ed. With Michael Lobban; Cambridge University Press, 2012; pbk, 2014) and special issues in The Journal of Global History (2014), Social Science History (2015) and Contemporanea (forthcoming, 2020) on risk, war and welfare and the global diffusion of social policy also emerged from this project.

Beyond her current work on marriage and family law, Julia is continuing research towards an intellectual biography of the British sociologist T. H. Marshall. The project sheds important new light on his work by highlighting the intersection of thinking about the modern welfare state and the shifting domestic, imperial and international landscapes which informed it.

Research Supervision

Julia supervises students in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century European (including British) history, in particular on the history of the welfare state and social problems and policy more broadly, including questions related to national, international and transnational regulation; government and bureaucracy; legal history; marriage and the family; and the history of the social sciences.

Current students:

  • Patricia Brennan - Working Together to Safeguard Children in Britain: Sheffield, 1870-1918.
  • Lauren Butler - A Community of Masters and Servants? Chatsworth, 1811-1914.
  • Chris Locke - GPs, Politics and the Evolution of State-funded Healthcare in Britain 1909- 1949.
  • Kate Adkins (second supervisor) - Stigmatisation, media and acne: A mixed methods interdisciplinary approach.
  • Eleanor Bland (second supervisor) - The Identification of Criminal Suspects by Policing Agents in London, 1780-1850.
  • Lucy Huggins (second supervisor) - Crime and Economies of Makeshift: Experiences of Poverty in the Old Bailey, 1750-1799.

All current students by supervisor

Completed students:

  • Brendan Murphy (second supervisor) - Killing in the German Army: Organising and Surviving Combat in the Great War.

PhD study in History

Publications

Full list of Publications

Books

Civilizing Marriage: Family, Nation and State in the German Empire (in progress).

Civilizing Marriage: Family, Nation and State in the German Empire (in progress).

When it unified in 1871, Germany consisted of numerous regions that were not only culturally distinct but also possessed differing legal systems and population groups. One of the new country’s first major laws targeting the social sphere was that on civil marriage, which would require marriage throughout the land to be standardised. Further policies on marriage and the family followed over the coming decades. Marriage, and the family with it, was now a matter for the state. Why had marriage and the family come to be political issues? And, what do these debates in Germany at the close of the nineteenth century have to tell us today about the role of government in legislating on family life? This book investigates dynamics of cultural and religious diversity in the German Empire, both at home and overseas, in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by focusing on the legal and administrative treatment of marriage and the family. Combining history and sociology, it sheds historical light on recent European debates about legal pluralism, gender and sexuality politics, human rights and global migration.

The First Modern Risk: Workplace Accidents and the Origins of European Social States (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018; paperback edn, forthcoming 2019).

The First Modern Risk: Workplace Accidents and the Origins of European Social States (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018; paperback edn, forthcoming 2019).

During the late nineteenth century, many countries across Europe adopted national legislation that required employers to compensate workers injured or killed in accidents at work. By focusing on experiences in Britain, Germany, and Italy, this book demonstrates how these laws reflected a major transformation in thinking about the nature of individual responsibility and social risk, with major implications for relationships between individuals and the state.

Ed., Marriage, Law and Modernity: Global Histories (ed.; London: Bloomsbury, 2017; paperback edn, forthcoming 2019).

Ed., Marriage, Law and Modernity: Global Histories (ed.; London: Bloomsbury, 2017; paperback edn, forthcoming 2019).

This collection brings together scholars from across the world in order to offer a global perspective on the history of marriage. It unites legal, political and social history, and seeks to draw out commonalities and differences by exploring connections through empire, international law and international migration.

Ed. (with Michael Lobban), The Impact of Ideas on Legal Development (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012; paperback edn, 2014).

Ed. (with Michael Lobban), The Impact of Ideas on Legal Development (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012; paperback edn, 2014).

This collection forms part of a three-volume set that contains the results of the second and final stage of an AHRC-funded project which aims to examine the nature of legal development in Western Europe since 1850, focusing on liability for fault. By bringing together experts with different disciplinary backgrounds – comparative lawyers and legal historians, all with an understanding of modern tort law in their own systems – and getting them to work collaboratively, the books in this series produce a more nuanced comparative legal history and one which is theoretically better informed.

Journal Theme Issues

Ed. (with Ilaria Pavan and Chiara Giorgi), ‘From War to Welfare: Global Perspectives since the Nineteenth Century’, special issue of Contemporanea (forthcoming, 2020)

Ed. (with Ilaria Pavan and Chiara Giorgi), ‘From War to Welfare: Global Perspectives since the Nineteenth Century’, special issue of Contemporanea (forthcoming, 2020)

This collection aims to reflect on the multifaceted causal links between war and the development of welfare states, which are conceived here broadly to include not only national social legislation but also the myriad of social programmes that flourished in the wake of war.

Ed. (with Julia Woesthoff), ‘Mixed Marriage, Interracial Relationships, and Binational Couples from Global and Comparative Perspectives’, special issue in The History of the Family (forthcoming, 2019)

Ed. (with Julia Woesthoff), ‘‘Mixed Marriage, Interracial Relationships, and Binational Couples from Global and Comparative Perspectives’, special issue in The History of the Family (forthcoming, 2019)

This collection aims to historicise recent research on and debates about intermarriage and interracial relationships, parsing the assumptions behind these contested concepts and tracing how these categories have shifted over time and space. In doing so, it also seeks to chart how intermarriages and other forms of interracial, binational and cross-confessional relationships took shape.

Ed. (with Eve Rosenhaft), ‘Risk, Security and the Social in Twentieth-Century Europe’, special issue in Social Science History 39 (2015)

Ed. (with Eve Rosenhaft), ‘Risk, Security and the Social in Twentieth-Century Europe’, special issue in Social Science History 39 (2015)

This collection investigates how states and agencies close to them have perceived ‘risks’ and tried to manage them over the course of the twentieth century. It highlights domestic social and economic issues, ranging from public health and pensions to planning for economic growth and stability, as areas for state-driven and international initiatives in risk management.

Ed. (with Martin Daunton), ‘Social Policy across Borders’, special issue in the Journal of Global History 9/2 (July 2014)

Ed. (with Martin Daunton), ‘Social Policy across Borders’, special issue in the Journal of Global History 9/2 (July 2014)

This collection calls for a global perspective on the history of social policy. It suggests that, from the middle of the nineteenth century, diverse forms of connection brought new understandings of ‘social problems’ across local, regional and national borders.

Journal Articles

‘Social Citizenship and Social Rights in an Age of Extremes: T. H. Marshall’s Social Philosophy in the longue durée’, Modern Intellectual History (June 2017): 1-30.

‘Social Citizenship and Social Rights in an Age of Extremes: T. H. Marshall’s Social Philosophy in the longue durée’, Modern Intellectual History (June 2017): 1-30.

This article demonstrates how T. H. Marshall's conceptualization of sociology—its subject, key questions and methodology—was embedded within broader moments in twentieth-century political history, including two world wars, the economic crisis of the interwar era, the onset of the Cold War and the rise of decolonization.

‘La (re)découverte du risque professionnel: l’indeminsation des ouvriers britanniques dans la perspective d’une histoire croisée, vers 1850-1900’, Le Mouvement Social 2014/4 (2014), pp. 187-204 [‘The (Re-)discovery of Occupational Risk: the compensation of British workers from the perspective of an Histoire Croisée, ca. 1850-1900’].

‘La (re)découverte du risque professionnel: l’indeminsation des ouvriers britanniques dans la perspective d’une histoire croisée, vers 1850-1900’, Le Mouvement Social 2014/4 (2014), pp. 187-204 [‘The (Re-)discovery of Occupational Risk: the compensation of British workers from the perspective of an Histoire Croisée, ca. 1850-1900’].

This article reflects on how Britain, the ‘first industrial nation’, dealt with the question of 'occupational risk'. It argues that ideas about risk were open to constant reinterpretation, and questions about blame and responsibility always remained in view.

‘Foreign Workers and the Emergence of Minimum International Standards for the Compensation of Workplace Accidents, 1880-1914’, Journal of Modern European History, 7, no. 2 (summer 2009), 219-239.

‘Foreign Workers and the Emergence of Minimum International Standards for the Compensation of Workplace Accidents, 1880-1914’, Journal of Modern European History, 7, no. 2 (summer 2009), 219-239.

This article shows how labour migration and the existence of overseas protectorates and colonies fostered international standards for compensation in the years leading up to the founding of the International Labour Organisation. It reveals how observations and communication across borders went hand in hand with the strengthening of explicitly national social-security systems.

Chapters

‘The Politics of Recognition and its Limitations’ (with Martin Lengwiler, et al.), in Paul-André Rosental, ed., Silicosis: A World History (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2017), pp. 105-39.

‘The Politics of Recognition and its Limitations’ (with Martin Lengwiler, et al.), in Paul-André Rosental, ed., Silicosis: A World History (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2017), pp. 105-39.

This chapter shows how the fatal occupational illness silicosis, which afflicts miners and other workers, gradually came to be identified and addressed across the globe in the first half of the twentieth century.

‘Social Policy, Welfare and Social Identities’, in Nick Doumanis, ed., The Oxford Handbook of European History, 1914-1945 (Oxford: OUP, 2016), pp. 323-42.

‘Social Policy, Welfare and Social Identities’, in Nick Doumanis, ed., The Oxford Handbook of European History, 1914-1945 (Oxford: OUP, 2016), pp. 323-42.

This chapter suggests that European social policies in the early twentieth century were characterized by an emphasis on integration and community. This perspective chimed with widespread utopian aspirations for social improvement voiced across the political spectrum and across the Continent. Nonetheless, the relative emphasis on integration and community varied across Europe and over time. Moreover, associated quests for an ideal future held the potential to be both enabling and oppressive.

‘Policy Communities and Exchanges across Borders: The Case of Workplace Accidents at the Turn of the Twentieth Century’, in Davide Rodogno, Bernhard Struck and Jakob Vogel, eds., Shaping the Transnational Sphere, 1830-1950 (New York/Oxford: Berghahn, 2014).

‘Policy Communities and Exchanges across Borders: The Case of Workplace Accidents at the Turn of the Twentieth Century’, in Davide Rodogno, Bernhard Struck and Jakob Vogel, eds., Shaping the Transnational Sphere, 1830-1950 (New York/Oxford: Berghahn, 2014).

This article explores how the workplace, and, in particular, accidents at work and industrial hygiene, prompted an efflorescence of interconnected transnational networks in the period from the late 1880s to the 1910s. By focusing on these transnational and international epistemic communites, this article reveals the tensions between ‘expert knowledge’ and national politics.

Teaching

Module Leader

Politics, Culture and National Identity in Britain, 1867-1918, HST248 (Level 2 module)

Politics, Culture and National Identity in Britain, 1867-1918, HST248

Between 1867 and the First World War, new political parties and civil associations were formed across Britain, like across much of Europe, to make government by the people a lasting reality. This module examines the nature of these democratic cultures by focusing on Britain in a European context. In particular, it examines the relationship between modes of civic engagement and conceptions of national identity, exploring how Britons’ views of democracy were intimately linked to their experiences with and understandings of broader European and global developments.

Culture Wars: Nationalism, Religion and Violence in Europe, 1870-1918 HST2040 (Level 2 Module)

Culture Wars: Nationalism, Religion and Violence in Europe, 1870-1918, HST2040

Between 1870 and 1918, Europe witnessed the rise of popular nationalism, new nation states, and violent clashes over 'national culture', ethnic minorities and religion. It also saw the fall of its three multiethnic land empires. This module explores a variety of case studies in order to analyse the nature and signficance of these 'culture wars' about national belonging and (in)difference, including Germany's Kulturkampf against Catholics in the 1870s; French anticlericalism in the 1880s; claims of Jewish infanticide in German villages in the 1890s; anti-semitism in Vienna in the 1900s; and, demands for secularism in the Ottoman Empire in the 1910s.

Britain’s Social Revolution: Welfare, State and Society, c. 1870-1914, HST3122/3123 (Level 3 module)

Britain’s Social Revolution: Welfare, State and Society, c. 1870-1914, HST3122/3123

This module introduces students to the powerful debates about and important reforms targeted at a variety of ‘social questions’ which haunted Britain from the late nineteenth century until the outbreak of the First World War. It demonstrates how new forms of knowledge, ideas about social solidarity and political and social movements shaped how Britons addressed issues such as poverty, unemployment and public hygiene. By analysing a wide variety of primary sources, including visual sources, this module will examine competing visions about the future of the nation and, in particular, what role the state should play in determining that future.

Debt, Money and Morality, HST3304 (Level 3 comparative module)

Debt, Money and Morality, HST3304

This unit aims to develops students’ ability and confidence in formulating analyses of conceptions and cultures of debt and money across a significant period of time. The module combines interdisciplinary and comparative approaches in case studies of different early modern and modern national/geographic contexts at an advanced level. Topics include the nature of money, ethics of debt, markets, trust, and financial institutions.

Policing the Family: Welfare, Eugenics and Love in Early 20th Century Britain, HST6049 (Postgraduate module)

Policing the Family: Welfare, Eugenics and Love in Early 20th Century Britain, HST6049

This module explores key themes in the history of the family in Britain at the end of the nineteenth and the beginning of the twentieth centuries from a variety of perspectives. It aims to show how the family became a site for political arguments about 'modernity', societal degeneration and hopes for the future at the fin-de-siècle. It draws on a wide range of recent historiography as well as sociological literature, and examines a range of sources including anthropological, sociological and legal material as well as literary fiction from the period. Seminar themes will include: (1) Political arguments about the family; (2) Love and divorce (3) Love and homosexuality; (4) Infant mortality and birth rates (5) Eugenics.

Public Engagement

Public Engagement

As principal investigator for the AHRC-funded Marriage and the State in Imperial Germany research project and the Marie Curie Individual Fellowship on Marriage and Diversity in the German Empire, Julia has written for a number of popular and expert periodicals, including The Conversation, History & Policy and History Matters. She has also taken part in public roundtables on ‘Marriage and Gay Rights: Contemporary Debates in Historical Perspective’ (Oct. 2014; hosted at King’s College London together with History & Policy)  and on ‘Cultural Diversity and the Family in Germany’ (May 2017, University of Göttingen).

Julia’s work on occupational health and the welfare state has also led to her involvement with the International Commission on Occupational Health, as a member of the Scientific Committee for its triennial historical conferences. It has also led to membership in the European Commission-funded Silicosis research project, which has combined historical and medical expertise in an effort to learn more about and combat a widespread and fatal occupational illness, and to membership in the AHRC-funded European Legal Development research project, where Julia co-directed a team of historians and lawyers who sought to uncover the history of ideas behind tort law and make them more accessible to the broader public.

Julia also gives public lectures related to her research on work and welfare at Museums Sheffield, and she has co-organised a public roundtable in Sheffield on ‘The Ethics of Work’ as part of the Faculty of Arts and Humanities’ Art of Work series. In addition, Julia has given a public lecture in Paris on the history of the welfare state in Britain, and she has participated in public roundtables and podcasts recorded in Paris, Bielefeld and Oxford on social and global history and welfare.

Administrative Duties

Administrative Duties

On leave 2018-19. Previous duties at Sheffield have included Pathway Leader for Social History, ESRC White Rose Doctoral Training Centre; Level-3 Tutor; Director, MA in Nineteenth Century Studies; Theme Lead, Faculty of Arts and Humanities ThinkCreate programme; Admissions Tutor; membership on Research Committee and Postgraduate Committee; External Examiner for the BA in History at the University of Bristol; External Examiner for the MA in Modern History and in Nineteenth Century Studies at King’s College London.