Research Supervisor Details

This page provides additional information about our research supervisors. You can either browser supervisors by department or search for them by keyword. Most supervisors also have a personal webpage where you can find out more about them.

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Dr Richard Jacques
r.jacques@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

  • Application of statistics in medical research
  • Analysis of routinely collected data
  • Multivariate data analysis
Professor Steven Julious
s.a.julious@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Research interests
  • Clinical trials
  • Clinical trial design
  • Early phase trials
  • Non-inferiority
  • Asthma epidemiology
Professor Jeremy Oakley
J.Oakley@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Probability and Statistics

Research interests

Bayesian statistics; eliciting probability distributions; medical statistics; health economics; quantifying uncertainty in complex computer models

Professor Stephen Walters
s.j.walters@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Research interests
Dr Gary Verth
g.verth@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

Mathematical modelling of plasma processes, e.g., with application to the Sun's atmosphere.

Dr Jose Pozo Soler
j.pozo@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering

Research interests:

 

  • Statistical shape modelling
  • Non-rigid image registration
  • Medical image computing
  • Musculoskeletal image analysis
Professor Mark Strong
m.strong@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My Research interests

I have three related research interests that fall under the general banner of Uncertainty Quantification: (1) how do we properly account for all relevant uncertainties when we build a computer model of a physical, biological or social system? (2) how do we (efficiently) compute value of information? (3) how do we work out the value of a computer model? How much should we pay to make a simple model more complex? When do we stop increasing the complexity of a model?

Jeremy OakleyJim Chilcott and I have proposed an "internal" discrepancy-based method for managing model uncertainty. See this paper in JRSS Series C, and this paper in SIAM/ASA Journal of Uncertainty Quantification. The method is discussed in more detail in my PhD thesis.

We have proposed an efficient method for computing partial EVPI. This method works for any number of parameters of interest and requires only the PSA sample. See this open access paper in Medical Decision Making. R functions to implement the method can be downloaded here. This paper uses Gaussian process-based methods that are nicely described in the  Managing Uncertainty in Complex Models (MUCM) toolkit.

The partial EVPI method extends nicely to the computation of EVSI. See here for our open access paper on the efficient computation of EVSI.

Professor Michelle Marshall
m.marshall@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Academic Unit of Medical Education

My interests focus on student engagement within the education process and in different educational contexts and environments so that students are able to achieve their potential.  I also have an interest in social accountability and what it means to be socially accountable in health professions education. 

Dr Denise Bee
d.bee@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Academic Unit of Medical Education

I have a number of years’ experience in undergraduate programme evaluations and management of medical assessments. Consequently these are areas I find most interesting when considering research topics.  Assessments can cover a number of formats and these begin in admissions and go all the way to Finals. I have a particular interest in the psychometrics of assessment.  Student evaluations are very important to the development of learning and teaching experiences.  I have an interest in questionnaire studies but am also fascinated by the breath of material that comes from free form collection of data in talking with students.

Dr Mauricio Alvarez Lopez
mauricio.alvarez@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Computer Science

Dr. Álvarez López is interested in machine learning in general, its interplay with mathematics and statistics, and its applications. In particular, his research interests include probabilistic models, kernel methods and stochastic processes. He works on the development of new approaches and the application of Machine Learning in areas that include applied neuroscience, systems biology, and humanoid robotics.

Dr Eleanor Stillman
E.C.Stillman@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

My main research interests lie in the practical application of statistics to geology and materials science. A long term concern has been the modelling of particle size, with investigations into its relationship with sediment transport processes and strength of composite materials. Other recent projects include the use of classification methods in pollen analysis, the design of resistant glazes and the production of computer-assisted-learning materials.

Dr Eleanor Stillman
E.C.Stillman@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Probability and Statistics

Research interests

My main research interests lie in the practical application of statistics to geology and materials science. A long term concern has been the modelling of particle size, with investigations into its relationship with sediment transport processes and strength of composite materials. Other recent projects include the use of classification methods in pollen analysis, the design of resistant glazes and the production of computer-assisted-learning materials.

Professor Thomas Bridgeland
T.Bridgeland@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

I am an algebraic geometer with a particular interest in homological methods and interactions with string theory. My main focus is on properties of derived categories of coherent sheaves on algebraic varieties. These arise in string theory as categories of D-branes, and are related via Kontsevich's famous homological mirror symmetry conjecture to Fukaya categories of symplectic manifolds. Categories with similar properties and a more explicit flavour can be defined using representations of quivers. Other closely related mathematical areas I have an interest in are Donaldson-Thomas invariants and Hall algebras.

Professor Neil Dummigan
N.P.Dummigan@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

Ramanujan has a famous congruence which is an example of a congruence involving the Hecke eigenvalues of a modular form, with a modulus coming from the algebraic part of a critical value of an L-function. I am interested in congruences involving the Hecke eigenvalues of modular forms, and more generally of automorphic representations for groups such as GSp4 and U(2,2), modulo primes appearing in critical values of various L-functions arising from modular forms. 

On the motivic side, there ought to be Galois representations associated to suitable automorphic representations, and in some cases this is known. Interpreting Hecke eigenvalues as traces of Frobenius elements, the congruences express the mod lambda reducibility of Galois representations. From this, often it is possible to construct elements of order lambda in generalised global torsion groups or Selmer groups, thereby proving consequences of the Bloch-Kato conjecture. This is the general conjecture on the behaviour of motivic L-functions at integer points (of which special cases are Dirichlet's class number formula and the Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer conjecture). Where predictions arising from the Bloch-Kato conjecture cannot be proved, sometimes they can be supported by numerical experiments. 

Professor Richard Wilkinson
r.d.wilkinson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

Uncertainty quantification, Monte Carlo (especially Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) methods), applied statistical modelling, climate science.

Professor Jeremy Oakley
j.oakley@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

My research interests are in Bayesian statistics, in particular uncertainty quantification for complex computer models, eliciting probability distributions from experts, and applications in Health Economics. On my personal website you can read these guidance notes for more information about PhD projects and suggested background reading.

Dr Richard Cooper
richard.cooper@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
The Medical School
Department of Sociological Studies
 
Research interests
  • Pharmacy
  • Non-medical prescribing
  • Addiction
  • Empirical and normative ethics in healthcare 
  • Medicine supply (prescribed and over the counter) and misuse/abuse (over the counter, illicit)
  • Medical sociology
  • Public Health

Methods

  • Qualitative (interviews, observation, ethnography, content analysis, narrative)
  • Mixed methods (questionnaires, secondary data analysis)
Professor Deborah Murdoch-Eaton
d.murdoch-eaton@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Academic Unit of Medical Education
The Medical School

My key interests focus around developing students individuality and enabling learners to “achieve their potential”.   I have a strong interest in understanding the factors that enable and constrain the impact of feedback on changing performance in medical and healthcare education.  Developing effective “educational alliances” – learner, supervisor and environment

This includes empowering students to become self-directed life-long learners, resilience, transitions into higher education and professional practice.

I am also active in research around the integration and impact of social accountability, including on learners, community organisations and higher education 

Dr Annamaria Carusi
a.carusi@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease
The Medical School

I have a broad humanities background, ranging from philosophy to critical and literary theory. I am interested in connections between epistemic, social, ethical and aesthetic aspects of science, with a particular focus on material practices and technologies. My research is deeply influenced by phenomenology (especially Merleau-Ponty), and is also convergent with philosophy of science in practice, new experimentalism and new materialism. My recent research has focused on images, models, simulations and visualisations in the contemporary biosciences, and on the role of technologies in computationally intensive interdisciplinary settings. My work is highly interdisciplinary, and I have close collaborations in the broad field of science studies, as well as with scientists.

I am interested in supervising PhDs in any of the following areas:

  • social epistemology of modelling.
  • comparisons between different kinds of models in medical research.
  • social and philosophical aspects of images and visualisations.
  • technology mediated perception and knowledge, in particular with a phenomenological slant.
  • philosophy of medicine.
Dr Frazer Jarvis
A.F.Jarvis@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

Dr Jarvis works in the area of algebraic number theory, an area which uses techniques from algebra, algebraic geometry and classical number theory, amongst others. In particular, he studies the relationship between modular forms, elliptic curves and representations of Galois groups. That this is currently an active area of research is clear from the recent proof of Fermat's Last Theorem by Andrew Wiles; Wiles uses exactly these methods in his proof. Dr Jarvis is particularly interested in generalisations of these ideas (known as the Langlands Philosophy), and even in possible generalisations of Fermat's Last Theorem. For example, one might ask whether the Fermat equation of a given degree (or a similar equation) has solutions in a given field extension of the rationals. Within this speciality, there are a number of possible research topics.

Dr Mordechai Katzman
M.Katzman@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

Dr Katzman's research is in the area of commutative algebra. Specifically, he is interested in the following. 

Characteristic p methods:

Certain theorems in algebra can be proved by showing that they hold in positive characteristic, and in characteristic p one has extra structure given by the Frobenius map xxp. There are several tools, notably tight closure, which exploit this extra structure to prove some remarkable theorems. 

Local cohomology modules:

This modules derive their importance partly from the fact that they detect interesting properties of modules over commutative rings (e.g., depth.) Unfortunately, these objects tend to be very big are rather mysterious. It is very difficult to describe them in any detail even in seemingly easy cases. Dr. Katzman has recently been producing both examples showing that these objects are more complicated than previously conjectured but also instances where they can be understood fairly well. 

Combinatorial aspects:

One of the simplest family of modules imaginable are monomial ideals in polynomial rings and, perhaps surprisingly, these objects have a very rich structure, in some sense richer than the structure of graphs. Dr Katzman has recently been studying certain monomial ideals associated with graphs a discovering some surprising connections between the algebraic and combinatorial properties of these objects.

Dr Paul Mitchener
P.Mitchener@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

My research spans algebraic topology and functional analysis. I am particularly interested in area where the two fields intersect, such as non-commutative geometry, K-theory, index theory and coarse geometry.

Dr Angela Sorsby
A.Sorsby@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Law

Research Interests

  • Evaluating initiatives
  • Restorative justice
  • Probation supervision
  • Desistance from crime
  • Training of criminal justice practitioners

Member of the Centre for Criminological Research.

Areas of Research Supervision

  • Quantitate research methods and statistics
  • Restorative justice
  • Probation supervision
  • Desistance from crime
  • Training of criminal justice practitioners
Dr Jennifer Burr
j.a.burr@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Broad area of interest:

  • Sociology of health and illness

Research methods I am able to supervise:

  • Qualitative

Specific areas of interest:

  • Reproductive technology
  • Research ethics
  • Gender and sexuality
Dr Victoria Chico
V.Chico@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Law

Research Interests

My research focuses on how English tort law might respond to novel legal challenges. In particular I am interested in how the tort of negligence might respond to perceived harms which might arise in the context of new medical and genetic services. Within this context I focus on how the concept of autonomy might function as a comprehensive basis for arguing that circumstances arising from novel services which would not hitherto have been considered to be harm, could in fact be perceived as harmful. This autonomy focus is a central feature in my recently published book (see below) and I intend this theoretical perspective to underpin future research.

Areas of Research Supervision

Aspects of medical law and the tort of negligence. Particularly where the focus is on novel forms of damage arising from medical or genetic services and the challenge these might present for negligence law. I am particularly interested in the concept of autonomy as the theoretical basis for the analysis of the interface between negligence and medical law.

Dr Cheryl Miller
c.a.miller@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

My research interests are varied, interdisciplinary and lie within the field of materials for biomedical and dental applications. My research focuses on the design, fabrication and characterisation of novel glasses, ceramics and composites for dental and medical applications. Much of this research is in collaboration with Engineering Materials (UoS), Imperial College London, Chubu University, Japan and Sao Paulo University, Brazil. My research has also progressed to the production of custom prostheses using novel production methods and advanced manufacturing techniques such as additive manufacture, Hot-Isostatic-Pressing, Spark-Laser-Sintering, freeze-casting, laser machining and electro-spinning. In addition, due to my involvement in the MMedSci in Dental Implantology, I also supervise projects in the area of dental implantology.

My research is progressing more towards knowledge and technology transfer, hence my industrial collaborations are widening and increasing, presently these include Ceramisys Ltd (a SME manufacturing and distributing bone augmentation materials); Fluidinova (a SME manufacturer of nanoceramics); Primequal (a SME specialising in development of medical devices); neotherix (a regenerative medicine SME specialising in novel bioresorbable scaffolds); CERAM (materials testing, analysis and consultancy); JRI (a manufacturer of orthopaedic implants and surgical instrumentation); Nobel Biocare (a world leader in innovative restorative and aesthetic dental solutions); Dentsply (a global leading manufacturer and distributer of high quality dental product) and GlaxoSmithKline (one of the world's leading research-based pharmaceutical and healthcare companies).

Dr Adam Whitworth
Adam.Whitworth@Sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Geography

Research interests

Welfare-to-work reform and the Work Programme; lone parents and welfare reform; social and spatial inequality; conditionality, paternalism and well-being; crime; poverty, deprivation and exclusion; spatial statistics.

Professor Caitlin Buck
C.E.Buck@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

My research draws on experience in archaeology, palaeoenvironmental science and statistics, encouraging experts from a range of fields to share ideas and resources. Previous and current work includes:

 
  • analysis of field survey data from Britain and Greece.
     
  • the calibration and interpretation of groups of related radiocarbon determinations.
     
  • the provenancing of archaeological ceramics with the aid of chemical compositional data.
     
  • development of models for relative archaeological chronology building (seriation).
     
  • analysis of the structure of prehistoric corbelled domes.
     
  • the use of Bayesian radiocarbon calibration to aid in tephrochronology.
     
  • models for interpreting spatio-temporal data such as those relating to the recolonisation of a landscape in response to past climate change or the arrival of domesticated cereals at the start of the Neolithic in Europe.
     
  • the development of models and methods for estimating radiocarbon calibration curves.
     
  • development of tailored statistical models to aid in palaeoenvironmental reconstruction on the basis of data preserved in ice cores and lake/ocean sediments.
Dr Evgeny Shinder
E.Shinder@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

Research interests

Algebraic Geometry, Number theory and Algebraic K-theory

Dr Christopher Stride
c.b.stride@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

Specific projects that Chris is currently working on include:

  • The effects of perfectionism on well-being
  • Cheating in sport; is it a team, individual or circumstantial act?
  • From pitch to plinth; a study of statues of sportsmen and sportswomen (see http://www.sportingstatues.com)
  • The psychology of nostalgia and the use of nostalgia branding
  • The effect of the built environment and residential outdoor space upon well-being in older people


Dr Simon Willerton
S.Willerton@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

Dr. Willerton is interested in various ideas in low-dimensional topology coming from quantum physics, and in their relationship to geometry and algebraic topology. 

In particular, methods from quantum field theory give rise to new invariants of knots and three-manifolds -- these are the so-called quantum and Vassiliev (or finite-type) invariants. A large part of the motivation for Dr. Willerton's work is to understand these invariants from a topological or geometric point of view. For instance, the Kontsevich integral is a construction which takes a knot and gives back a sort of Feynman diagram expansion: this embodies a rich algebraic structure that is reminiscent of certain objects from algebraic topology, but it is not clear at the moment how to relate these. 

Well-studied examples of quantum invariants arise when one fixes a Lie group. Motivated in part by trying to understand the Kontsevich integral, Dr. Willerton has considered (with collaborators in San Diego and Oxford) the less well-studied invariants which arise when one fixes a hyper-Kahler manifold. This work has revealed unexpected algebraic structures in the derived category of coherent sheaves on a complex manifold. 

The theory of gerbes is a related interest of Dr. Willerton. Gerbes can be thought of as the next step beyond line bundles. Ideas from this area feed into K-theory, string theory and the quantum invariants mentioned above. 

In recent times Dr Willerton has been interested in the connections between metric spaces and category theory. This has lead in particular to him studying measures of biodiversity.

Professor Jeremy Dawson
J.F.Dawson@Sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

Jeremy's research falls broadly into three areas, with plenty of crossover between them – management of health care organisations, team working, and statistics. Recent projects in health care include a study of the effects of NHS staff engagement and experience on patient outcomes; various studies of team working in health care, particularly in mental health services; an examination of the effects of organisational restructuring in the NHS; and a project looking at the diversity of hospital staff and their representativeness of the local community. In 2014 he begins an NIHR-funded study evaluating Schwartz Center Rounds® in the NHS.

As well as teams in health care, he has a more general interest in team diversity, and in particular how it should be measured. As a statistician he has also undertaken a wide range of methodological research, particularly regarding interpretation of interaction effects, measurement of diversity, analysis of incomplete team data, and the effects of aggregation on relationships. He has published over 30 papers in refereed academic journals in the fields of psychology, management, health care and research methods, as well as numerous project reports and articles in practitioner publications. He is an editorial board member of five journals, and an Associate Editor of the Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology.

Miss Jessica Wright
Jessica.Wright@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

My research interests relate to medical research law and ethics, with a particular focus on both consent and biobanking. During my PhD I researched what influences (either positively or negatively) the harmonisation of biobanks. As a result I am particularly interested in the development and implementation of standards within busy organisations such as the NHS. Additionally, I am interested in privacy, confidentiality and data protection in relation to research.

Professor Christopher Burton
chris.burton@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Academic Unit of Medical Education
School of Health and Related Research

I am an academic GP with a particular interest in how doctors and patients deal with persistent physical symptoms. My work aims to help doctors explain symptoms constructively. We recognise that symptoms have both peripheral (body) and central (brain) processes and the challenge is to translate developments in science, particularly neuroscience, into explanations which safely make sense of symptoms for patients and lead to better management

I have other interests around diagnosis, testing and reassurance, and healthcare use in relation to both mental and physical ill-health. I use a variety of methods including analysis of large data, development and evaluation of clinical interventions, and technological innovation.

Within the university I lead the Academic Unit of Primary Care, and represent the Academic Unit of Medical Education on faculty research committees. I am a member of the Centre for Urgent Care Research within ScHARR.

Dr Chris Millard
c.millard@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of History

Research interests

Chris researches the history of medicine and psychiatry in late-modern Britain (1900-present). He is particularly interested in ideas about mental health and mental illness, suicide and self-harm, child abuse, and emotional well-being. He looks at the interactions between the National Health Service, social work and broader welfare state when treating mental illness and promoting mental health. He is interested in how institutions and professional authority shape our sense of identity and self.

He is happy to supervise students interested in any aspect of medicine, psychiatry, welfare and health in twentieth-century Britain. This includes ideas of emotional health and welfare, broadly conceived, and focus on any kind of medical or psychological expertise, including interactions between medicine and online environments.

Dr Haluk Sengun
M.Sengun@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics
Research interests

I am interested in the cohomology of arithmetic groups, automorphic forms, abelian 
varieties, Galois representations and the mostly conjectural connections between them 
as envisioned by the Langlands Programme. I especially study the above objects in the 
setting where the relevant arithmetic groups live in the Lie group PSL(2,C) (such as 
"Bianchi groups"). I enjoy developing computer programs and carrying out numerical 
experiments to explore and gain insight. 

I am also involved in the construction of a database on Bianchi modular forms (that is, 
modular forms for GL(2) over imaginary quadratic fields) and related arithmetic data 
inside the L-functions and Modular Forms Database (LMFDB).
Professor Kate Reed
k.reed@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Research interests

My research focuses on two areas: the social and ethical implications of genetic screening and the impact of novel technological application in medicine. These interests are reflected in two of my most recent projects. The first was a project funded by the The Wellcome Trust which focused on exploring the gendered nature of genetic screening in pregnancy. The second, a recently completed British Academy funded project on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) use in pregnancy. The findings from this project were recently presented at an interdisciplinary dissemination event funded by the Sociology of Health and Illness Foundation (December 2013). I am currently collaborating with the medical school and local NHS to develop this imaging work further, focusing in particular on the role of imaging in post-mortem. I am also continuing to develop research bids in the area of genetics, family history and health.

Students with an interest in the new genetics, and reproductive technology would be particularly welcome. I would also welcome supervising students with interests in the areas of social theory, race and ethnicity, gender studies.

Professor Richard Clayton
r.h.clayton@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Computer Science

Research interests

Computational models of structure and function of human cells, tissues and organs, with an emphasis on:

  • Calibrating models against experimental and clinical data using machine learning.
  • High performance computing and numerical techniques for computationally intensive models.
  • Uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis of detailed multiscale models of the heart.
  • Gaussian process emulation of computationally intensive models.
  • Developing tools to guide intervention and reatment in clinical settings.

See also www.insigneo.org for information about the Insigneo institute for in-silico medicine in Sheffield.

Professor Paul Hatton
paul.hatton@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Professor Hatton has interests in biomaterials, medical devices and tissue engineering for clinical applications in human skeletal tissues. The five major themes for his research are (1) the development of bioactive glasses and ceramics for mineralised tissue repair, (2) glass-ionomer bone cements, (3) In vitro evaluation of biocompatibility, and (4) Cartilage and bone tissue engineering on biomaterial scaffolds. He is also active more broadly in the promotion of academic-industrial collaboration and technology transfer in the orthopaedic, craniofacial and dental material sectors. See "Links" below for more details on this and the wider research of the Biomaterials Research Group.

Dr Hualiang Wei
w.hualiang@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering
Research interests:
  • Identification and modelling for complex nonlinear systems
    • NARMAX methodology and applications.
    • Artificial neural networks (ANN), radial basis function networks (RBFN), wavelet neural networks and multiresolution wavelet models, computational statistics, machine learning, intelligent computation and data mining.
    • Regression analysis, parameter estimation and optimization, sparse representation.
    • Nonlinear and nonstationary (time-varying) signal processing, system identification and data modelling.
    • Spatio-temporal system identification and modelling.
  • Bioscience signal processing and data modelling
    • Neurophysiology and neuro-imaging data modelling and analysis.
    • EEG, fMRI and ECG data processing, modelling and analysis.
    • Data based classification, pattern recognition, anomaly detection, with applications in clinical and medical diagnosis and prognosis.
  • Forecasting and analysis of complex stochastic dynamical processes with applications in
    • Space weather systems.
    • Environmental systems.
    • Computational economics and finance.
  • New concepts and methodologies developments for the identification and analysis of nonlinear complex systems.
  • Applications and developments of signal processing, system identification and data modelling to control engineering, bioengineering, neuroscience, systems/synthetic biology, environments, space weather and other emerging areas.
Professor Paul Blackwell
P.Blackwell@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Probability and Statistics

Research interests

Bayesian statistics; inference for random processes; statistical ecology; environmental and archaeological applications

Ms Shijie Ren
s.ren@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests 

  • Bayesian statistics in clinical trials and health economics
  • Network meta-analysis
  • Extrapolate time-to-event data
  • Eliciting probability distributions
  • Value of information analysis
Dr Ali Gooya
a.gooya@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering
  • Statistical and variational medical image computing
  • Group-wise analysis of high-dimensional biological patterns
  • Probabilistic generative/discriminative modelling
  • Bayesian inference
  • Graphical models
  • Machine Learning for Medical Imaging
  • Pattern Recognition for Population Imaging

 

Professor Shaun Quegan
S.Quegan@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

Research interests

I work on the physics, measurements, models, statistics, system analysis and sensor properties that all form part of measuring aspects of the land-atmosphere carbon cycle, with a particular emphasis on exploiting satellite measurements to improve carbon cycle models. A lot of my work is to do with forests, including measuring their biomass (I'm the lead scientist on the European Space Agency BIOMASS mission) and detecting and quantifying tropical deforestation.

Dr Joanne Thompson
j.thompson1@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Academic Unit of Medical Education

My current research is focused around the Social Accountability of Medical Schools, the impact on medical students and community organisations working in partnership with the university. This involves supporting students to become more aware of health inequity and social determinants of health and the broader implications for society.


My background is in academic psychology and counselling and I have a longstanding interest in the psychosocial impact of illness, in particular in relation to cancer survivorship and the management of children with long term conditions

Dr Graeme Manson
Graeme.Manson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

The main concern of Dr Manson´s research has been, throughout, the development of robust structural health monitoring strategies for the purposes of damage identification. Over the years, this has taken on various approaches beginning with the examination of the response of nonlinear mechanical systems before moving into the fields of signal processing, pattern recognition, machine learning and multivariate statistics for damage identification. More recently, with the questions of damage prognosis and robustness of structural health monitoring systems, the research has led toward the investigation of the propagation of uncertainty through systems and structures.

Dr Christopher Carroll
c.carroll@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Research interests
  • Systematic review and evidence synthesis of medical, health and social science topics, including qualitative and mixed method evidence synthesis
  • The Health Technology Assessment (HTA) process
  • Information retrieval and programme evaluation (implementation fidelity) research
Dr Saurabh Mishra
s.mishra@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of History

Research interests

Saurabh's research focuses on modern South Asian history, with a particular interest in issues related to the history of science and medicine, agrarian history, labour history, and the history of caste and religion. He is currently working on a project that explores the medical/health dimensions of indentured servitude in the Caribbean. 

Dr Elizabeth Cross
e.j.cross@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

Elizabeth’s main research interests are in the field of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM), specifically vibration based SHM, which uses monitored dynamic properties of a structure for condition assessment and damage detection. SHM is still a relatively young field and so much of the research that goes on is confined to the laboratory. While it is true that research into SHM is becoming increasingly popular, it has failed, so far, to be taken up in any major way by industry, despite the obvious economic and safety benefits it could offer.

Elizabeth’s current research is broadly concerned with how SHM can be made to work for the real world and encompasses the application of statistics and machine learning technology, as well as mathematics from other disciplines such as econometrics.

Dr Elisabeth Garratt
elisabeth.garratt@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield Methods Institute

Beth joined the Sheffield Methods Institute as a Lecturer in Quantitative Methods in September 2019. Before this, she was a Research Fellow at the Centre for Social Investigation, Nuffield College, Oxford. She completed her PhD in Social Statistics at the University of Manchester in 2015, exploring the role of income on mental health in 3-12 year-old British children and their parents. Her research focusses on mental health in adults and children, poverty, food poverty, and homelessness.

She is a strong believer in engaging with non-academic audiences, and to this end has spoken about food insecurity on TV and radio. Her research on UK food insecurity has received widespread press coverage, been cited in government debates and was also made into an impact film.

Dr Helen Marriott
h.m.marriott@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease
The Medical School

My main research interest is in the role of macrophages in host defense against respiratory pathogens, in particular Streptococcus pneumoniae.  Additionally, I am interested in the effect of influenza A virus on macrophage function, its effect on the regulation of macrophage apoptosis and how this may lead to increased susceptibility to bacterial superinfections. I have been using a variety of in vitro and in vivo models and am currently developing computational models to support this research.

My main collaboration is with Professor David Dockrell.  I also collaborate on murine in vivo models with Professor Moira Whyte, Dr Sarah Walmsley and Dr Colin Bingle.  My work on the development of computational models is in collaboration with Dr Alex Best (Mathematics and Statistics), Professor Rod Smallwood (Computer Science) and Professor Mike Boots (University of Exeter).

Professor Roger Lewis
Roger.Lewis@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

Roger's research interests are split into three areas: solving industrial wear problems; application and development of a novel ultrasonic technique for machine element contact analysis and design of engineering components and machines. The research themes are wide ranging, but the main focus is on:

Railway Engineering

  • Wheel/rail contact tribology – including wear (wheel profile evolution), RCF, friction management (use of top of rail friction modifiers; grease lubrication and traction gels), isolation and links to effective train detection
  • Rail infrastructure improvement – including laser cladding of rail to reduce wear/RCF; design and testing of insulated rail joints; overhead line wear testing
  • Condition monitoring – including real-time measurement of the wheel/rail contact; force measurement and detection of loosening in bolted joints.

Human Interactions

  • Fundamental characterization and modelling of skin friction including use of OCT to determine sub-surface skin strain
  • Hand/object interactions – including kitchen equipment, sports equipment etc. and effects that wearing medical examination gloves has on dexterity, grip and tactile discrimination
  • Human tissue interaction with medical devices including catheters
  • Pedestrian slips and falls, particularly barefoot slips and characterisation of flooring performance
  • Multi-scale modelling of skin to incorporate effects of moisture and temperature to optimise design of medical products that interface with skin.
Professor Ian Sabroe
i.sabroe@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease
The Medical School

Research Interests

I have two main areas of research: inflammation biology, and interdisciplinary research

I am involved in developing interdisciplinary research in the field of medical humanities, and co-direct the Sheffield Centre (links adjacent).  Medical Humanities Sheffield has an extensive portfolio of research and teaching covering broad fields from history to literature to the law, and their links with biomedical science and medicine.

My group has numerous interests within respiratory medicine, particularly focusing on airway and vascular inflammation, and the biology of the innate immune system. We study the roles of TLRs in airway and vascular inflammation, using TLR agonists and natural viral pathogens. We have a range of models in cells, and directly in the human. We are also interested in how airways inflammation is initiated, why people with lung disease are at greater risk of coronary vascular disease, and whether inflammation contributes to the biology of pulmonary arterial hypertension. We are developing new treatments for human TLR-induced inflammation, and setting up new models of inflammation in human volunteers to probe how inflammation might work and best be treated.

My work is funded by the Medical Research Council, the Wellcome Trust, Asthma UK, Heart Research UK, and the NIHR.  We are very grateful for all the support we receive.

Dr Mahnaz Arvaneh
M.Arvaneh@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering

Research Interests:

  • Biomedical signal processing, machine learning and pattern recognition
  • Statistical and adaptive signal processing, and mathematical modelling of bioelectric signals
  • Neural and cognitive process, clinical applications, and understanding
  • Brain–computer interface algorithms, systems, adaptation, and applications
  • Robotic and BCI-based stroke rehabilitation
  • Neuroprosthetic learning and control
  • Medical system and device research and development

Keywords: Automatic Control and Systems Engineering

Dr Dana Damian
d.damian@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering

Research Interests:

We are interested in the design of soft assistive and medical robotic devices that operate in the close proximity of biological organisms and tissues long-term. We focus on the computational role of soft mechanical structures and their control to realize highly adaptive metabolic and physiological functions in living or robotic organisms. Some of our work includes robotic implants, prosthetic wearables (tactile sensors and haptic devices), and plant prostheses.

Keywords: Automatic Control and Systems Engineering,

Dr Jackie Elliott
j.elliott@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism
The Medical School

Research interests

My research interest in Diabetes started whilst I was a medical student, and has continued ever since. My current research interests include complex interventions for patients with diabetes. I’m involved in interventions to examine the best way in which to deliver education to different patient groups, for example those with hypoglycaemia unawareness, or young people, and how best to integrate technology, e.g., the use of insulin pumps, physical activity monitors etc.

Dr Louise Robson
l.robson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Biomedical Science

Research Interests

Our research is focused on the role of ion channels in the physiology and pathophysiology of epithelial cells, particularly renal, intestinal and airway cells. In the kidney our work has concentrated on the role of K+ channels and the K+ channel regulator KCNE1. In collaboration with R Muimo (Medical School) we also have a particular interest in cystic fibrosis and the role of CFTR in airway, gut and kidney.

Read more on research in the Robson laboratory

Dr Peter Rockett
p.rockett@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering

Research interests

  • Multi-objective genetic programming, particularly for feature extraction in machine learning and data mining
  • Pattern recognition/machine learning, particularly unified methods for training large margin classifiers
  • Quantitative analysis of X-ray angiograms for diagnosis/treatment of occlusive vascular disease
  • Data mining of medical databases: Classification and regression
  • Knowledge discovery in process control


Dr Alexander Rothman
a.rothman@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease

My research interests are the pathology and treatment of cardiovascular and pulmonary vascular diseases. My current work focuses on the pathology of pulmonary arterial hypertension and the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Recent pre-clinical studies have led to early phase clinical studies of pulmonary artery denervation and implantable pulmonary artery pressure monitors.

Our work is supported by the Wellcome Trust, Medical Research Council UK and by industrial collaborators. We are greatful for the support of our funders and study participants.

Professor Angela Cox
a.cox@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism
The Medical School

Research Interests

My first area of interest is the identification and characterisation of both inherited and somatic genetic variants associated with cancer. We use statistical genetics and bioinformatics tools to fine-map cancer-associated genomic regions, and functional genomics to identify the candidate causal variants and their mechanism of action. We collaborate with colleagues in the School of Mathematics and Statistics in developing new statistical genomics approaches, and in the mathematical modelling of the effects of inherited variants on cancer hallmark phenotypes. We have a particular interest in the CASP8/ALS2CR12 region on 2q33, which exhibits pleiotropy and is associated with multiple common cancers. We participate in various international genetics consortia including BCAC, PRACTICAL, Interlymph, and ILCCO, and are members of the Sheffield Institute for Nucleic Acids (SInFoNia). Our current research is funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), Yorkshire Cancer Research (YCR), and Breast Cancer Now (BCN). 

My second area of interest is the use of circulating cell-free DNA as a source of tumour biomarkers. Tumours shed DNA into the circulation (ctDNA), and the ctDNA can be used to identify therapeutically-relevant tumour mutations, and prognostic biomarkers. We are using low coverage highly parallel seqencing for copy number analysis, and digital droplet PCR and targeted sequencing for mutation analysis, to identify predictive and prognostic markers in a number of common cancers for which we have sample resources. 

Mr Matthew Franklin
matt.franklin@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My current interests are in the use of routinely collected care data for the purpose of costing analysis, economic analysis and decision modelling. I also have an interest in the capability-approach and extra-wefarism and its conceptual and practical application to economic evaluations and decision making, and the conceptual and practical use of outcome measures in general.

I can supervise students interested in the use of large databases of rountinely collected care data for health economic analysis and decision modelling problems. These databases include, but are not limited to:

  • Secondary Uses Service (SUS)
  • Hospital Episode Statistics (HES)
  • Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD)
  • ResearchOne
The aforementioned are some of the more commonly used databases, but I have experience using rountinely collected care data from primary, secondary, intermediate, mental health, ambulance and social care services. 
 
I can also supervise students interested in the conceptual and practical basis of using outcome measures for the purpose of economic evaluation; this includes those students interested in the extra-welfarist approach to welfare economics in relation to the market for health and healthcare.
 
I have more specific interests in research focussed on frail older people, dementia, cognitive impairement and more generalised mental health conditions.

 

Dr Chris Holland
christopher.holland@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

Research interests

Chris’ research uses tools developed for the physical sciences to better understand Nature’s materials, from latex to collagen, but with a focus on silk.

By investigating unspun silk’s flow properties his group has been able to gain unique insights into their biodiversity, structure and evolution. Additionally, this work has made important links between natural and industrial fibre processing which has lead to a fundamentally new way of designing, testing and fabricating bio-inspired materials.

Today the Natural Materials Group combines multiple instruments with rheology, from microscopes (confocal) and spectrometers (IR) to synchrotrons (SANS at ISIS and SAXS/WAXS at ESRF) in order to understand exactly how silk proteins arrange themselves into one of Nature’s most impressive materials. You can see video's of Chris' work here.

He is also chair of RAPS (Recent Appointees in Polymer Science), on the committee of the Natural Materials Association and part of the EPSRC Early Career Manufacturing Forum. Outside of academia he sits on the advisory board of Oxford Biomaterials which commercialises high-tech silk-based devices for a range of medical and non-medical applications.

Professor Paul Martin
paul.martin@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Research interests

I have two main areas of research interest. The first is the ethical, legal and social issues associated with emerging medical technologies and the second focuses on the commercialisation of biotechnology and expectation dynamics in medical innovation. My research has previously examined the development of gene therapy, genomics, pharmacogenetics, stem cells and regenerative medicine. I have advised the European Parliament, the Conseil d'Analyse Economique (part of the French Prime Minister's Office), the UK Department of Trade and Industry and the Wellcome Trust. I am a member of the Editorial advisory Boards of Sociology of Health and Illness and New Genetics and Society.

As regards my research interests in synthetic biology, I am currently a member of a BBSRC working group on synthetic biology, a co-investigator in a recently established multidisciplinary chell network and have co-authored a major review of the social and ethical issues raised by synthetic biology which was published in June 2008.

As regards my research interests in neuroscience, I am leader of a strand of research on neurosociety as part of the £1.6m Leverhulme Trust Programme Grant 'Making Science Public'.

Dr Lang Yang
l.yang@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism
The Medical School

Research interests

My current research interests are quantifying the effects of osteoporosis and its treatment on bone geometry, bone tissue distribution and structure, and bone mechanical strength, with particular focus on the proximal femur. Development of image processing and analysis methods for medical images is an essential part of my research, so does the structural engineering models generated from medical images. This has resulted in two streamlined analysis software, one for dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and another for quantitative computer tomography of the hip. My research aims are to accurately assess the bone strength non-invasively and to develop diagnostic tools that accurately predict the risk of bone fracture and monitor the treatment effects.

I am also interested in understanding mechanical environment at fracture site and how that modulates biological processes of fracture healing. This involves the determination of mechanical properties of fracture fixation devices by mechanical testing, non-invasive assessment of the mechanical property of healing tissues and computer simulation of fracture healing.

Dr Gregory Cook
g.cook@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering

Research interests

  • Computational electromagnetics; integral (e.g. Method of Moments) and differential (e.g. Finite Difference Time Domain) solutions to Maxwell’s Equations
  • Analysis and design of novel antennas embedded in multi-layered substrates
  • Spiral antennas
  • Superconducting and superdirective antennas
  • Microwave antenna holography and measurement
  • Antenna design for mobile communications
  • Health issues related to mobile phones¹
  • Effects of RF electromagnetic fields on biological systems¹
  • TEM cell design and related RF dosimetry¹
  • Magnetic resonance imaging of nerve impulses¹
  • Antenna design for magnetic resonance scanners¹

¹Activities carried out by medical / engineering interdisciplinary research group EMIT (Electro-Magnetic Interactions with Tissue)


Professor Arne Hole
a.r.hole@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Economics

Research interests

Arne´s research interests lie in the area of applied microeconometrics, focusing on health and labour economics. He has a particular interest in stated preference methods and the econometric analysis of discrete choice data. He also has an interest in statistical programming and has written several modules for the statistical software package Stata. He has been in involved in research projects funded by the UK Medical Research Council and the Research Council of Norway, among others. Arne is interested in supervising PhD students in applied microeconometrics.

Dr Shannon Li
xinshan.li@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering
Dr Li's research interest is in the human musculoskeletal system, particularly on personalised finite element modelling of bones and skeletal muscles. These models are constructed based on medical images such as CT and MRI. Dr Li has ongoing research projects with the Sheffield Children's Hospital and Jessop Wing. Her work focused on: (1) providing a quantitative tool for the diagnosis of unexplained fracture in children, (2) tools to monitor women's health, (3) biomechanics of skeletal muscles to understand the healthy and diseased states.

Research keywords
  • Biomechanics of bones and skeletal muscles
  • Nonlinear finite element analysis
  • Organ-level modelling of the musculoskeletal system
  • Continuum mechanics
Professor Alison Loescher
a.loescher@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

In 2003 I initiated a service to manage patients with chronic orofacial pain. The service is now well established and receives referrals from a wide geographic area, including many tertiary referrals. The rarer causes of facial pain are frequently seen within the clinic making it a valuable teaching clinic for both medical and dental higher surgical trainees and dental undergraduate students. In the development of the facial pain service, links have been made with colleagues in neurosurgery, neuromedicine and palliative care. Weekly clinics, held with neurosurgery, review patients with trigeminal neuralgia requiring surgical treatment. This clinical interest in facial pain forms the basis for some of the research projects that are currently being undertaken.

Dr Kamran Mumtaz
k.mumtaz@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

Kamran's research is in the area of Additive Manufacturing (AM) (also known as 3D printing and Rapid Manufacturing), a layer by layer process which produces fully functionally parts directly from a CAD model.

Kamran has been involved in AM since 2005 and specialises in metals process and materials development. He has worked with a number of AM technologies such as Selective Laser Melting (SLM), Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) and Electron Beam Melting (EBM) processing a variety of aluminium, cobalt, nickel, steel and titanium alloys for aerospace, automotive and medical industries.

Professor Iain Wilkinson
i.d.wilkinson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease
The Medical School

Research interests

I aim to further our understanding of neurological disease and thereby aid its diagnosis and treatment via in-vivo MR Imaging & Spectroscopy. The emphasis of this has always been on the translation of MR techniques and the findings of MR studies into clinical use. Clinical areas thus far concentrated on have included:

  • central nervous system involvement in Diabetes Mellitus
  • neurodegereration / the dementias
  • cerebrovascular
  • psychiatric diseases
  • neuro-oncology
  • retroviral infection/encephalopathies
  • abnormalities of the spino-cerebellar thalamic tracts

I'm also interested in the non-medical applications of MR particularly with respect to our understanding of the human mind.

Dr Nicole Baumgarten
n.baumgarten@sheffield.ac.uk

School of Languages and Cultures

 Research interests

I welcome research students who are interested in applied linguistics in its broadest sense. Qualitative and multiple/mixed methods approaches (incl. participatory and inclusive designs), interdisciplinary research as well as collaborations with institutions and organizations outside the University are all welcome. Interesting topics include but are not restricted to the following

 

  • Individual multilingualism (from a socio-cultural perspective)
  • Intercultural communication
  • Interpersonal communication
  • English as a Lingua Franca
  • Translation and localization
  • Multimodal communication (including audiovisual translation)
  • Intercultural/contrastive pragmatics
  • Register analysis (comparative/diachronic)
  • Communication in organizations and institutions (including web-based communication)
  • Business communication
  • Interaction with technology (including user studies)
  • Technology and science communication
  • Risk, health and safety communication
  • Medical communication
  • Second language use
  • Second language identities

 

Dr Elizabeth Craig-Atkins
e.craig-atkins@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Archaeology

Research interests:

I am a specialist in human osteology and palaeopathology with particular interests in multidisciplinary approaches to questions surrounding past population structures, health, disease and lifestyle. I have worked with human remains from many periods and locations, but have primarily focussed on material from post-Roman to modern periods in the UK. My current main areas of research include:

  • Multidisciplinary analysis of osteological and funerary data from early medieval to post-medieval contexts
  • The character and provision of funerary practices in early Christian and medieval England
  • Health status and social status in past populations
  • Disease, disability and disfigurement in the past (including social attitudes to sickness and medical/surgical interventions)
  • The archaeology of childhood
  • Archaeology of the body, especially practices for managing, manipulating and curating human remains
Dr Kurt De Vos
k.de_vos@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Neuroscience
The Medical School

Research interests

Research in the laboratory focuses on the mechanisms of nerve cell death in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; also known as motor neuron disease (MND) or Lou Gehrig disease), hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) and Parkinson’s disease (PD). We are especially interested in the involvement of axonal transport, mitochondria and ER.

Current research themes include:

  • The mechanisms causing defective axonal transport of mitochondria in ALS, PD and HSP.
  • The cellular roles of C9ORF72 protein and their role in ALS and FTD
  • The biology of close contacts between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria and their involvement in health and disease

Work in the lab is funded by grants from the Medical Research Council (MRC), the Thierry Latran Foundation, the Motor Neurone Disease Association (MNDA), the Spastic Paraplegia Foundation, and the Moody Endowment Fund.

Dr James Shaw
j.e.shaw@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of History

Research interests

James works on the relationship of legal structures (laws, practices, institutions) to the daily practices of economic life, with a special focus on early modern Italy. He has worked on petty crime and small claims litigation in Venice, and on retailing in the medical sector in Florence. His present research examines denunciations of contractual fraud from seventeenth-century Venice to explore how people experienced the workings of the market at the everyday level of understandings, practices and customs. He is particularly interested in the way that people's experiences of credit markets were conditioned by factors such as poverty, gender and status.

He welcomes applications from postgraduate students with an interest in projects that bring together social, economic and legal perspectives, and particularly projects focusing on the history of early modern Italy.

Professor John Brazier
j.e.brazier@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

SF-6D preference-based index

  • Developed by Brazier et al (2002). Syntax files available fromhttp://www.shef.ac.uk/scharr/sections/heds/mvh/sf-6d
  • International valuation studies in Japan, Hong Kong, Portugal, Brazil, Australia and Singapore
  • Comparisons to other generic preference-based measures

Deriving preference-based measures from condition specific measures

  • Published studies: Kings Health Questionnaire, Atopic Dermatitis in Children, Menopausal specific health related quality of life questionnaire, Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire, Overactive Bladder Questionnaire, Sexual Functioning Questionnaire.
  • Current studies: Dementia Quality of Life (DEMQoL), Epilepsy QoL battery.

Modelling preference data

  • Applying Bayesian methods to estimating preference-based algorithms
  • Estimating health state values from ordinal data (rank and DCE)

Validity of EQ-5D across medical conditions.

Mapping from condition specific and other generic measures onto EQ-5D

  • Recent and ongoing trial based economic evaluations: Complementary therapy (YACBAC trial), treatments for varicose veins, computerised cognitive behavioural therapy in MS, Borderline Personality Disorder (SPeDi trial)
  • Model based economic evaluations: computerised cognitive behavioural therapy (NICE), Dialectical behavioural therapy for Borderline Personality Disorder (HTA)

Examining the relationship between health and well-being (and the role of adaptation)

Dr Natalia Bulgakova
N.Bulgakova@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Biomedical Science

Career history:

  • 2015-present: Lecturer, Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Sheffield, UK
  • 2009-2015: Research associate, Gurdon Institute, University of Cambridge, UK
  • 2007-2009: Research associate, Max-Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden, Germany
  • 2004-2007: PhD, Institut für Genetic, Heinrich-Heine Universität Düsseldorf, Germany

Research interests

The mechanism that attaches neighbouring cells in our body to each other is known as cell-cell adhesion. Recent work has demonstrated that cell-cell adhesion is also important for communication between the neighbouring cells to decide when to divide, migrate or die.

Our lab is interested to understand how cell-cell adhesion contributes to normal development of a whole organism. We focus on E-cadherin, a transmembrane protein that provides cell-cell adhesion between the epithelial cells. Using a combination of genetic assays, biochemistry and quantitative imaging techniques in Drosophila model system we study how E-cadherin functions in various developmental processes, for example cell neighbour exchange and tissue growth, and how it is regulated during development. In future, we aim to apply this knowledge about normal function of E-cadherin to treatment of medical conditions arising from defects in E-cadherin function such as epithelia-derived tumours.

Dr Helen Griffiths
h.griffiths@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism
The Medical School

Research Interests

  • Vision screening: In my role as the British and Irish Orthoptic Society Lead for Vision Screening I have developed detailed maps and data of vision screening service provision in the UK and Ireland. This research includes development of a national audit tool for vision screening. The results of this research are being used to inform Public Health England in development of guidelines on vision screening for local authority commissioners.  Additionally, I am a Partner in the EUs€reen study, investigating vision and hearing screening programmes for children in all EU states using a cost-optimisation model, http://www.euscreen.net/
  • Awareness of eye conditions: In collaboration with the Medical Physics group we have developed and released a virtual reality (VR) smartphone app simulating nystagmus. The app uses eye movement recordings from people with nystagmus and replicates the eye movements within VR. The app allows the user to gain an appreciation of what it is like to have oscillopsia. We are continuing to explore the use of VR in the awareness of eye conditions and potentially as a management tool in the future.
Professor Derek Ingham
d.ingham@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Professor Derek Ingham is an applied mathematician who has worked on a wide variety of engineering and industrial mathematical problems in collaboration with numerous engineering scientists and with several industries and acted as an Expert Witness. He has published research papers with members of staff in all the engineering and environment departments, and several science and medical departments. At present he supervises 15 PhD students and has successfully supervised over 100 PhD students. Further he is on the editorial board of 12 international journals, has written 16 research books, over 900 research papers in referred journals and over 40 confidential industrial reports. He has received funding from over 70 different organizations.

In particular, he has research interests in energy:  wind energy, fuel cells; heat and fluid flows: flows in porous media, ill-proposed problems, cementing of oil castings, proppant transport in  fractures, Stirling Engines, heating of oils and in ship holds. Carbon capture and storage. Environment: ventilation, fume cupboards, sampling, aerosols, filtration, gravity currents, atomisers, blowing snow. Computational Fluid Dynamics: Finite volume methods, finite element methods, Lattice Boltzman methods, boundary element methods. Turbulence. Boundary layer theory.

Dr Platon Kapranos
p.kapranos@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

Research interests

Casting and related processes such as Rheocasting & Thixoforming.

Semi-solid processing of alloys and composites (Thixoforming). 

Thixoforming produces complex near-net-shaped components of high integrity, with mechanical properties better than conventionally cast components. As a relatively ‘new process’, before proving its value as a commercial success, thixoforming has had to exploit alloys that were already available. However, the true potential of this process will only be utilized through an expanding portfolio of alloys that fulfill the needs of industries such as aerospace, and bio-medical which demand innovative new alloys with near net shape, high strength and integrity products that can perform at such demanding environments.  Currently, research is undertaken on the semi-solid processing of high melting point alloys such as steels, iron-alloys, copper-alloys, super-alloys and other exotic materials in order to further exploit the potential benefits of this under-utilised metal forming technique. Although thixoforming of high melting point alloys offers exciting possibilities and tremendous potential, and has already been part of research work of over thirty years, it is still at present in the research stage of development.

Currently involved in two collaborative pieces of research in semi-solid processing of high melting point alloys; with Poland (Copper alloys) & Spain (Steels).

Non-destructive testing.

Investigating the development of a calibration standard for Dye Penetrants.

Dr Amaka Offiah
a.offiah@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism
The Medical School

Research interests

I am interested in the imaging of the paediatric musculoskeletal system including suspected child abuse, skeletal dysplasias including osteogenesis imperfecta and rheumatological conditions such as juvenile dermatomysosits and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. My research includes developing methods of determining which children have fragile bones prone to fracture and which do not. More specifically, I am concentrating on the optimisation of current techniques and development of novel methods of distinguishing brittle from normal bones, in understanding the mechanisms of accidental injury in infants and young children, in post-mortem imaging and in improving the detection and dating of the subtle fractures seen in abuse. More generally within the paediatric musculoskeletal system I am developing normative data for a signficant number of radiographic parameters measured in children for which robust normal standards do not exist, including vertebral fracture assessment, base of skull measurements and bone age. In collaboration with colleagues from the Department of Engineering, I am developing finite element models of children's bones to improve our understanding of accidental and inflicted injuries. My research has a focus on learning and teaching, and amongst other projects I am developing a module for medical students/junior doctors to improve their understanding of the Courtroom experience in the context of suspected child abuse.

Professor Andrew Smith
andrew.smith1@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of English Literature

Research interests

My principal area of research is focused on the Gothic of the late eighteenth century to the beginning of the twentieth century. My first monograph, Gothic Radicalism: Literature, Philosophy and Psychoanalysis in the Nineteenth Century(Macmillan 2000) explored how a Gothic tradition during this period critically reconstructed an Idealist tradition from Burke to Freud. This demonstrated the intellectually radical critical potential of the Gothic. My second research monograph, Victorian Demons: Medicine, Masculinity and the Gothic at the fin-de-siècle (MUP 2004) centred on the representation of disease and degeneration from the 1880s to the end of the century. The book consists of a series of related case histories, including chapters on Joseph Merrick (aka ‘The Elephant Man’), the ‘Jack the Ripper’ Whitechapel Murders, and medical textbooks on syphilis. The book examines how medicine at the time became increasingly implicated within a language of degeneracy that it was ostensibly meant to diagnostically police. My third research monograph The ghost story 1840-1920: a cultural history (MUP 2010), which was nominated for the inaugural Allan Lloyd Smith prize for the best book of Gothic scholarship published between 2010-2011, examined the various economic, cultural and political contexts of the ghost story.

I welcome PhD applications on any area of Gothic studies, and the literature of the long nineteenth century.

Dr Veronica Barnsley
v.barnsley@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of English Literature

My primary research interests are in colonial and postcolonial literatures from India and Africa, with a particular focus on alternative and global modernisms and writing interested in children, youth and development.

I am currently completing the manuscript of my first monograph, Postcolonial Children: Infancy and Development in South Asian Fiction in English. The book considers the figure of the child in fiction that deals with anti-colonial activism, Indian independence and the postcolonial state, looking at writers including Mulk Raj Anand, R.K. Narayan, Attia Hosain, Shashi Deshpande and Nadeem Aslam.

I am also beginning a new project called ‘Youth and Health in Postcolonial Literatures: India, Nigeria, South Africa’, a comparative analysis of the concept of youth that seeks to make connections between Postcolonial Studies and the growing field of Medical Humanities.

I am a founding member of The Northern Postcolonial Network, which supports knowledge exchange and networking amongst scholars working on postcolonial topics across the north of England and organisations and community groups with intersecting interests. We build sustainable relationships with groups and communities through research, public engagement and creative workshops in which we can explore issues including migration, asylum, human rights and inclusive pedagogy. Details of our past events and future activities can be found here www.northernpostcolonialnetwork.com

I am a member of The British Association of Modernist Studies, the Modernist Studies Association and the Postcolonial Studies Association.

Dr Bernard Corfe
b.m.corfe@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism
The Medical School

Research Interests

Work in my group primarily examines the relationship between diet, short-chain fatty acid production and metabolism and cell fate (apoptosis and cell cycle). Our work is across a number of scales, from molecualr cell biology of through to human intervention trials with nutrients to prevent or manage disease.

  • Butyrate and cell fate determination
  • Short-chain fatty acid metabolism
  • Crypt cell fate modelling
  • Organ level modelling
  • Diet-Microbiome Interactions, Functional analysis of Probiotics
  • Molecular Biology of keratins
  • Role of vitamin D in IBS / lower gut health
  •  
  • Medical Humanities: patient experience in IBS and IBD

Student performance

Prospective students become part of a supportive and productive research team. We aim to provide a balance between laid-backness and scientific rigourousness that allows students to develop as independent leaders with rounded skillsets. >90% of students have published research in their projects, completed their PhD / MD on time and many of gone on to successful research or academic roles.

Collaborations

We have a multidisciplinary team and collaborate effectively in order to provide wide-ranging projects of exceptional scope and vision. Collaborators include Chemical Engineers, Nutritionists, Computational Modellers, Clinical Gastroenterologists. The majority of students graduate with good interdisciplinary training and experience.

External Activity and benefits to students

Bernard Corfe is a highly networked research leader with membership of mutiple national committees in Nutrition Society, NIHR, British Society for Gastroenterology as well as rtack record of collaboration with industry. This exceptional network capital allows the optimisation of development and career opportunities for members of the team.

 

Professor Ingunn Holen
i.holen@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism
The Medical School

Research Interests

The research in my team is focussed on tumour-induced bone disease in breast and prostate cancer, with particular emphasis on effects of therapeutics including bisphosphonates. My main interest is elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in tumour cell-bone cell interactions, and how these can be targeted by anti-cancer therapies. This work also includes investigating the role of the microenvironment in driving bone metastases, the effects of female hormones, and how therapeutic agents affect the tumour vasculature. I have several collaborative projects both with other researchers in the medical school, nationally and internationally. I work closely with the clinical staff in our academic unit on translational research projects, transferring the results from our laboratory projects into clinical feasibility studies. In 2010 I was awarded a CRUK program grant together with my colleagues Professor Peter Croucher and Dr Colby Eaton entitled ‘Defining the Bone Metastasis Niche’. Work on this program involves studies of the cellular mechanisms required for solid tumours to successfully colonise the skeleton. Together with colleagues in Leeds, Glasgow and London I am working to establish a national in vivo tissue bank funded by an “Infrastructure for Impact” grant awarded by the NC3R. I am part of a European consortium awarded a Marie Curie Initial Training Network (BONE-NET). Work in my team is funded by local and regional charities, industry, the EU, MRC, CRUK, BCC, YCR and NC3R.

Dr Rachel Tomlinson
r.a.tomlinson@sheffield.ac.uk
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Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

As part of the Experimental Mechanics Laboratory, current research projects are in the development and use of optical instruments to measure strain in a wide range of applications, such as particulate reinforced materials, automotive glass, and aircraft components.

Digital Image Correlation techniques are being used to study damage in particulate reinforced materials. A range of particulate toughened polymers are being studied: to investigate experimentally the deformation mechanisms around the particles; to identify and characterise the potential failure mechanisms through experiment; and to explore how these mechanisms can be modelled mathematically. The work is sponsored by Cytec Engineered Materials Ltd, who are global providers of technologically advanced composite materials for high performance aerospace and automotive applications.

Within safety critical industries, such as in aircraft manufacture, numerical analyses need to be verified by experiment. However both the cost of development tests and the time taken to perform them are considerably greater than the cost and time required to conduct Finite Element Analyses (FEA). Airbus are sponsoring research into the use of Additive Layer Manufacturing (ALM) techniques to accurately produce scaled structural models for the aerospace industry with the aim of improving efficiency of design.

Asymmetric stress profiles through glass may be measured using magnetophotoelasticity. Pilkington plc are sponsoring research into developing a full-field magnetopolariscope system, which will enable more effective measurement of residual stress in glass. Non-destructive methods to measure stresses in three-dimensional photoelastic models of engineering components are being investigated. A joint research project with The University of Manchester is developing a new instrument using tomographic techniques, which will allow experimental verification of design prototypes to be performed quickly and efficiently.

Thermoelastic stress analysis techniques are being used in a number of different areas including exploring why a crack grows in the direction that it does, and investigating damage in polymers and elastomers used in the oilfield industry.

Other areas of interest are with birefringent fluids with applications in a wide variety of practical engineering problems, e.g. flow through micro-channels; unsteady flows; biological flows; and classic fluid dynamics problems, and using photoelasticity in medical and dental applications.

Dr Kate Weiner
k.weiner@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

I work at the intersection of medical sociology and science and technology studies. My doctoral research looked at lay and professional constructions of familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH), a treatable hereditary condition associated with heart disease. My analysis focussed on the themes of geneticisation, genetic responsibility and biosociality, three prominent concepts in discussions of the social implications of genetic knowledge. Subsequent research projects looked at more mundane health technologies for cholesterol management, including cholesterol-lowering foods containing plant sterols and prescription and over-the-counter statins. Current research is expanding this work on consumer health technologies, looking at self-monitoring technologies such as blood pressure monitors and weighing scales/BMI monitors. All of these studies consider professional expectations as well as people’s accounts of why and how they adopt and use, or don't use, particular products or technologies. They consider the way responsibilities for health are distributed, the practices involved and the implications for forms of expertise in relation to health care. The work critically engages with notions of 'self-care' and 'health behaviours', proposing alternative lenses such as care infrastructures and practice theory approaches. I have an ongoing interest in developments in the biomedical sciences. Recent work has looked at the routine practices of racialised prescribing.

 Research interests:

  • everyday health practices
  • mundane health technologies
  • self-monitoring, self-tracking, self-care
  • social implications of biomedical developments eg genomics, epigenetics
  • social categories in the clinic
  • qualitative research methods
Professor Jon Sayers
j.r.sayers@sheffield.ac.uk
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Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease
The Medical School

Research interests

The group is involved in four main areas:

  • Molecular mechanisms involved in protein:DNA interactions.
  • Microbial proteases, pathogenesis and the host response.
  • Novel applications of biotechnology to biomedical research and drug development.
  • Structure-based drug design.

Ongoing topics include the following:

Mechanistic Studies on 5'-3' Exonucleases

These enzymes are essential for DNA synthesis and in repair of DNA damage in all cells. They are also important commercially for use in many diagnostic systems based on Taqman type genetic assays. We are using site-directed mutagenesis, crystallography and kinetic studies to determine how these complicated enzymes function and to develop new uses through enzyme engineering and nanotechnology approaches. We are currently working on exonucleases from human pathogens such as E. coli, Clostridium difficile, Staphylococcus aureus and Haemophilus influenzae. The work has been funded by the Florey Institute,  BBSRC, The Wellcome Trust and the White Roses Consortium. Current emphasis is on mechanisms and developing new antibiotics and antimicrobial agents.

Protein-DNA Recognition

Many important biological processes such as gene expression are regulated by proteins binding to specific DNA sequences. We are studying novel DNA-binding proteins from viruses and pathogenic bacteria. We have chosen proteins with no sequence homologues in the databases. Such proteins are thus unique and studying how they recognize their target sequences should provide new insights into molecular recognition processes.

Significance of IgA1 Proteases in Pathogenic Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae

We have discovered a strong link between carriage of gene containing a highly variable domain and pathogenesis in these two meningitis-causing organisms. Collaborative work is underway with Dr. Tony Howard (PHLS, Bangor) and Professor Robert Read (Infection & Immunity, Sheffield). We have recently reported data demonstrating that pathogenic strains of Neisseria meningitidis produce higher levels of an enzyme capable of destroying human antibodies. The protease attacks IgA1, a major component of the mucosal immune system. This work has been funded by The Meningitis Research Foundation, Meningitis UK and the Colin Beattie Memorial Fund and the Medical Research Council.

Secreted Microbial Proteins

We work on a number of organisms whose only known host is man. Proteins secreted by these microbes must interact with the human host at the molecular and cellular levels. We use a combination of bio-informatics, molecular and cell biology to explore these interactions. By understanding their mechanisms, we hope to develop novel tools for biotechnology and therapeutic approaches.

Cytokine Therapeutics

Asterion Ltd. is a biotech spin-off company founded in Sheffield and aims to develop novel cytokine based therapies by using protein engineering and nanotechology approaches to produce new and improved treatments for human and animal disease. 

Dr Lance Twyman
l.j.twyman@sheffield.ac.uk
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Department of Chemistry

Research Interests

Drug delivery

The therapeutic effectiveness of any drug is often diminished by its inability to gain access to the site of action in an appropriate dose. This is often due to the poor solubility of the drug in the body’s aqueous environment. One method of aiding solubilisation is to encapsulate the drug within the hydrophobic domains of a globular polymer. In our group we are investigating the use of dendrimers (shown in Figure 1 below), hyperbranched polymers and other polymeric systems, as encapsulation and delivery agents.

Supramolecular chemistry

Supramolecular chemistry can be used to form discrete self assembled structures capable of performing a variety of functions. Our interest in this area has led to the development of supramolecular polymers that form a variety of structures. These include linear and dendritic polymers for use as potential light harvesting systems. We are also investigating the use of certain diblock polymers that can self assemble into spherical materials (single and bilayered) possessing microenvironments that can be exploited as catalysts for a variety of reactions.

Model enzymes and proteins - biomimetics

Over millions of years Nature has evolved a series of molecules capable of performing a variety of important biological functions. These include catalysis, transportation and signalling. We are attempting to create much simpler synthetic analogues of these molecules. The principle aim is to engineer molecules capable of outperforming the natural systems they aspire to imitate. One example could include a catalyst that works for ALL oxidations, rather than one evolved to catalyse a single specific example. Alternatively, we could construct a catalyst that can generate non-natural isomers. As well as catalysis, related systems could be developed with important medical benefits. One such area includes our work on the development of artificial blood. Towards these aims we are exploiting a number of systems, which include self assembling polymers and globular dendritic molecules.

Protein binding

Proteins bind and recognise each other using large surface areas. This recognition process is vital for a variety of biological applications. Understanding these interactions, as well as being able to inhibit them, may lead the development of new therapeutic molecules. Towards these aims we are exploiting the well-defined shape and size of certain globular macromolecules. Specifically we are using a series of dendrimers to study and inhibit protein-protein binding. Our initial results clearly indicate a simple size relationship between dendrimer and selective protein binding. That is, smaller dendrimers can interact preferentially with proteins possessing smaller binding areas, whilst larger dendrimers can interact preferentially with proteins possessing larger binding areas.  

Dr Joab Winkler
j.r.winkler@sheffield.ac.uk
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Department of Computer Science

Research interests

Joab Winkler’s main research interests are image processing, and  algebraic and numerical properties of curves and surfaces in computer-aided design systems.

  • IMAGE PROCESSING: The removal of blur and other degradations from an image arises in many applications and it may be considered a preprocessing operation before the image is interrogated for, for example, medical diagnosis. The most challenging problem arises when prior information on the source of the degradations and the exact image is not known, in which case the problem is called blind image deconvolution. My research is concerned with the application of polynomial computations, implemented using structure-preserving matrix methods, for the solution of this problem. The next stage of this work on image improvement is its extension from static images to video images for the observation of dynamic events, for example, the flow of blood.
 
  • GEOMETRIC MODELLING: Curves and surfaces in computer aided design systems are represented by polynomials. Computational problems arise because the coefficients of these polynomials are corrupted by noise due to manufacturing tolerances and numerical approximations, and robust computations on polynomials are therefore required. Recent work on these robust computations includes the computation of a structured low rank approximation of the Sylvester resultant matrix, and the devlopment of a polynomial root solver for the determination of multiple roots of the theoretically exact form of a polynomial, when the coefficients of the given polynomial are corrupted by added noise.
 
  • FEATURE SELECTION: Many problems in science require the identification of the most important features that characterise a system, such that the expected response of the system to new data can be accurately predicted. Problems arise because the given data that is available to identify these important features is usually insufficient to define the system uniquely, which implies that the equation to be solved has an infinite number of solutions, This raises the question as to the solution that is selected from this infinite set of solutions, and the criterion used for this selection. My research is concerned with the development of mathematical theory and methods for the selection of the best solution, defined using a specified criterion. The features that characterise a system may be a combination of numerical data, binary data and categorical data, and a mathematical model that describes a system must include these three classes of data. This problem has many applications, including bioinformatics, signal analysis, atmospheric physics, and in general, problems in which the response (output) is a function of many variables (inputs), only some of which are important and must therefore be identified.