Translational research & innovation facilities

Our translational research centres bridge the gap between industry needs and curiosity-driven academic research.

They're led by industrial partners and boost levels of innovation and skills across specific sectors. Businesses can work with the centres on a one-off project, or join as a member for a long-term collaboration.

AMRCAdvanced Manufacturing Research Centre (AMRC) with Boeing

The AMRC with Boeing is dedicated to working with manufacturing businesses, from global aerospace giants to local SMEs. It has become a model for research centres worldwide and is part of the High Value Manufacturing Catapult.

View a short film about the AMRC 

CATCHCentre for Assistive Technology and Connected Healthcare (CATCH)

The Centre for Assistive Technology and Connected Healthcare is a translational research centre at the University of Sheffield. Their aim is to make a significant and lasting contribution to the quality of life and independence of the growing number of people with disabilities and long-term health conditions.

View CATCH's current projects

ScHARR Knowledge ExchangeSchool of Health and Related Research (ScHARR)

Innovation and Knowledge Transfer (IKT) allows ScHARR to utilise the impact of their research by applying their expert knowledge and skills in the real world of health and social care. Their support covers private industry, public and third sectors as well as other policy, decision-making and academic collaborations in health.

View ScHARR's industry testimonials

MAMRCMedical Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre (MAMRC)

The aim of the MAMRC is to enable businesses to access the science base and medical practitioners required to develop innovative products in the medical devices, connected healthcare and assistive technology sectors. The Medical AMRC is supported by the HEFCE Catalyst Fund designed to streghten & enrich the economy of the Sheffield City Region

View the HEFCE Catalyst Fund overview

Future translational research centres

The Advanced Manufacturing Campus will soon be home to three new engineering research centres designed to accelerate the region's advanced manufacturing capabilities. The new centres, funded by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), will work with large businesses and SMEs to carry out initial research into new technologies which can be translated into industry-ready applications.

Sheffield Royce Translational Centre

The Sheffield Royce Translational Centre has received a £4million grant to help manufacturing companies in the Sheffield City Region to adopt next generation technology to produce and process metal powders. The centre will work alongside another new Royce research centre at the University’s city campus, which will be focussed on early-stage research. The translational centre will then take these research discoveries and work with companies to help apply it to their manufacturing challenges. It will house global-leading academics and engineers along with industrial-grade machines to bridge the gap between research into metal powder and applications for sectors such as aerospace, automotive, energy and medical high-value manufacturing.

Laboratory for Verification and Validation (LVV)

A £3.2million grant has also been given for the creation of a new laboratory for testing large engineering structures under real life vibration conditions. The Laboratory for Verification and Validation (LVV), as it will be known, will capitalise on the University's globally recognised expertise in this field to offer radical improvement in product design, operation and lifetime for engineering structures. At present innovative new structures, for example plane parts or civil engineering structures such as bridges, make extensive use of computer models to test performance. The LVV will allow these structures to be tested under real-life conditions, most notably vibrations, in a world-leading facility.

Integrated Civil Infrastructure Research Centre (iCAIR)ERDF

Also being developed is the Integrated Civil Infrastructure Research Centre (iCAIR). This centre, which will receive £1.5million from the ERDF, will take the Sheffield City Region’s expertise in advanced manufacturing and apply it to national civil engineering and infrastructure challenges. It will look at how big data, advanced materials and robotics can be used to increase innovation in the sector, which has historically been seen as slow to adopt new technologies.