28 January 2022

New research grant to support research into digital twins for high-value engineering applications

James Law and John Clark are part of a team led by David Wagg (Mechanical Engineering) that have been awarded £890k of grant funding by The Alan Turing Institute to support research into digital twins for high-value engineering applications.

Robot arms in a lab

James Law and John Clark are part of a team led by David Wagg (from the Department of Mechanical Engineering) that have been awarded £890k of grant funding by The Alan Turing Institute to support research into digital twins for high-value engineering applications. The DTHIVE project will be carried out by a team of researchers from the Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre and the Faculty of Engineering. The overall mission is to establish a centre of excellence for research into digital twins for high-value engineering applications.

The project will focus on applications relating to aerospace, manufacturing and energy use in buildings. The project runs from October 2021 until March 2022, and is intended to deliver working prototypes in the three application areas defined above. The primary scientific objective is to investigate the time-evolving behaviour of digital twins.

REF 2021 illustration

Research Excellence Framework 2021 results

The results demonstrate our research and impact excellence across a broad range of disciplines and confirm that our research is having a significant positive impact on lives across the globe.