Dr Simon Johnston PhD

Senior Research FellowSimon Johnston

Department of Infection, Immunity & Cardiovascular Disease
Firth Court
Western Bank
Sheffield
S10 2TN
United Kingdom

Tel:  +44 (0)114 222 2301 (Office)
Tel:  +44 (0)114 222 2702 (Lab)
Email:  s.a.johnston@sheffield.ac.uk
Web:  johnstonlab.group.shef.ac.uk/

Biography:

2018 - Senior Research Fellow.
Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease, Bateson Centre, University of Sheffield.
2012 - 2018 Medical Research Council - Career Development Award Fellow
Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease, MRC Centre for Developmental and Biomedical Genetics. (2012-2014) and Bateson Centre (2014-), University of Sheffield.
2012 - 2017 Krebs Institute - Fellow
Krebs Institute, University of Sheffield.
2011 - 2012 Lister Institute Post-Doctoral Research Associate
University of Birmingham, Birmingham.
2010 - 2011 Wellcome Trust - Post-Doctoral Research Associate
University of Birmingham, Birmingham.
2007 - 2010 Medical Research Council - Post-Doctoral Research Associate
University of Birmingham, Birmingham.
2003 - 2007 PhD Cell Biology
University of Birmingham.
2000 - 2003 BSc (Hons) Biochemistry
University of Birmingham.

Research Interests:

My research group is focused on the study infectious disease to improve patient treatment and to further our fundamental understanding of how the immune system functions. We use a multidisciplinary approach in collaboration with biologists, clinicians, engineers and physicists. In this way we aim to use the best experimental model to answer the specific research question at hand.

We have a particular interest in opportunistic fungal infections in immunocompromise. One example is Cryptococcus neoformans, which is a fungal pathogen of humans and causes hundreds of thousands of deaths in the severely immunocompromised world-wide each year. Most life-threatening infections are in individuals with AIDS in Africa where it is the most common cause of meningo-encephalitis and the cause of ~15% of AIDS-related deaths. In our studies of cryptococcal disease my group has contributed to how the immune system is defective in responding to cryptococcal infection in immunocompromise and what features of cryptococci drive their virulence.

Currently, we have three research priorities:

  • Macrophage mediated immunity to opportunistic infection
  • Central nervous system pathology in infection and immune system disease
  • Mechanisms and regulation of phagocytosis

Publications

For Key Publications see below. For a full list of publications click here.

Journal articles