Sheffield Teaching Hospitals Trust projects

Intercalated BSc Medical Sciences Research available projects

The Hallamshire Hospital.
Off

Projects:

Improving the Diagnosis of Pancreatic Cancer with Endoscopic Ultrasound.

Main Supervisor

Professor Andrew Hopper (andrew.hopper1@nhs.net)

Second Supervisor

Professor David Sanders (david.sanders1@nhs.net)

Aim and Objectives

Gastrointestinal BSc projects in the Academic department of Gastroenterology (www.sheffieldgastro.nhs.uk) Introduction: Come and take your BSc year with us – you will love it! 😊 There are numerous research projects to choose from in different areas: endoscopy, capsule endoscopy, inflammatory bowel disease, functional gut disorders, coeliac disease and many, many more. There is flexibility for you to pick - come and chat with us to find out what you would like to do and what is on offer. Every BSc student to date has published (with a PubMed ID – useful for points in future applications). There have been 17x 1st class with honors & 3x 2:1. Every student has received a £1,000 bursary.

Research Methodology

We are the largest Gastroenterology Department in the UK. Currently there are 30 Consultants (6 Professors). As a reflection of being one of the premier UK units we have won 11 Clinical Service Awards (10 National and 1 International) and 9 Clinical Research Awards (6 National and 3 International) in the last decade. We are a thriving and happy department. Objectives: We wish to give you a broad base of research learning in a friendly department with excellent support. Fantastic research opportunities and exposure to clinical practice. Many students also describe that they gained clinical confidence by talking to and recruiting patients as well as working in endoscopy during their project. Methodology: During the intercalation application process, you will have the chance to meet with the consultant supervisors within our department who are offering upcoming projects. You may be working with a database or clinical letters, you may have the opportunity to get involved with departmental recruiting (if you wish) for other studies, you will work alongside our nursing and medical team and will gain clinical skills whilst supporting an endoscopy list.

Expected Outcome

Scientific and medical opportunities: You will have excellent in-house methodological support from your supervisor and clinical fellows within the department. At any given time, there are 2-5 students undertaking BSc projects and up to 5 fellows (doctors who are training to become gastroenterology consultants but undertaking an out of programme experience). This is a close-knit group based on Ward P2 (Royal Hallamshire Hospital) with their own office – which means you have a lot of fun socializing within the department! Every Friday we all have lunch together and presentations at the informal Friday GI Academic Meeting. The unique clinical studies that you will have the opportunity to undertake often lead to changes in clinical practice. You will be well supported in a thriving NHS GI research environment. You may be taking bloods, putting cannulas in, watching gastroscopies or colonoscopies. There is plenty of patient contact and you will feel that you are contributing to the team. Previous students have loved the friendly clinical environment. "My confidence has grown throughout this year both personally and professionally. I now feel able to integrate myself into a clinical team to get more out of clinical placements in the future. I also had a whole year to practice taking bloods/inserting cannulas and talking to patients about procedures. This year has given me the ability to be confident working independently and when presenting to large audiences. It has been a lot of fun!” – Emily Greenaway GI BSc 2021-2022

Type of Project

Clinical project - based in the clinical environment with patients/including service evaluation

Additional Training

Every September you get to attend our ShefGastro annual symposium. This is an all-day gastrofest held at the Crowne Plaza Hotel (Sheffield). You get to watch world class speakers in gastroenterology and on top of all of that there is free food throughout the day! All students have been able to present at our local Friday lunchtime academic meeting, our regional meeting (Bardhan Fellowship, usually held annually in March) and at the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) meetings (usually held annually in June). This means that you are super confident and have overcome the ‘hurdle in our minds’ that presentation can be. This is a medical life skill and being taught presentation skills and presenting in a nurtured environment prepares you for when your own BSc presentation comes around. These opportunities also teach you how to field questions – another valuable medical life skill! Although whilst you read this you will only be thinking (understandably) of ‘what do I get’ in the short-term by doing this GI BSc project. In the long-term, there is a far greater gain. Most of your medical training is didactic but after this experience you will have a more inquisitive mind and this, we promise, will make you a better doctor. You will not just follow medical protocols, but you will personally be able to understand and weigh up the medical science behind your decision making. All students within the department receive a 1K bursary for your 12-month period in research. This allows you to pay for registration at the BSG annual conference, plus travel and hotel accommodation and still have plenty of funds left over for non-alcoholic beverages 😉

An investigation into the predictors of outcome in patients presenting with acute aortic dissection

Main Supervisor

Dr Saima Ehsan (saima.ehsan@nhs.net)

Second Supervisor

Mr Govind Chetty (govind.chetty@nhs.net)

Aim and Objectives

The overall aim is to investigate the predictors of outcome in patients presenting with acute thoracic aortic dissection
The research component of the project is to look at the associations of various variable or a combination thereof; demographics, pre existing conditions, medication, type of dissection, clinical parameters, biochemical parameters, time of intervention that may exist with good outcomes favourable or otherwise.

Research Methodology

The student will be expected to carry out the following elements of the research project:
1) Literature review on acute aortic syndromes, focussing on thoracic aortic dissections
2) Retrospective data collection using trust resources : Review of all patients presenting to STH with the diagnosis of acute aortic syndrome focussing on the following
Demographic data, Co morbidities, Prescribed medications on admission, Initial clinical/biochemical/radiological assessment, Radiological classification Inpatient clinical journey , Discharge destination and outcomes at six months of FU
3) Student will be supported in data analysis work

Expected Outcome

Clinical Translation: Ability or otherwise, to identify patients presenting with acute aortic syndrome with focus on thoracic aortic dissection, and modify the variable/variables that may have an influence patient outcome

Type of Project

Clinical project - based in the clinical environment with patients/including service evaluation

Additional Training

Exposure to open and endovascular cardiac and vascular surgery to provide context to the research project. Initial training in radiological assessment.

Improving foot outcomes in people with diabetes

Main Supervisor

Dr Rajiv Gandhi (rajiv.gandhi1@nhs.net)

Second Supervisor

Dr Greig Marni (marni.greig@nhs.net)

Aim and Objectives

Diabetic foot ulceration is the commonest cause of hospitalisation in people with diabetes and also the commonest reason for lower limb amputation in the UK. Although there is now strong evidence regarding interventions to reduce ulceration and amputations, the incidence remains stubbornly high.

A key part of the project will be to try and determine factors that result in people with diabetes presenting with recurrent foot ulceration or progressing to amputation. Many also die prematurely. This is still a poorly understood area and better understanding of these factors could lead to the deployment of strategies to improve outcomes. This study will involve prospectively following up people who have presented with ulcers and determining what factors at baseline predict for how they are likely to progress. In particular, it will examine how illness beliefs and psychological barriers contribute to poor concordance and outcomes.

This is an ongoing study and the student will have access to a large database of cases collected by previous students.

Another project will involve looking at how redesign of footcare services post-Covid has impacted on the delivery of care and key foot outcomes.

Research Methodology

This study will use both qualitative and quantitative data from a variety of sources including primary and secondary care medical databases, as well as patient interviews.

The study examining factors affecting outcomes of foot ulceration will incorporate factors such as screening practices in primary care, referral patterns, management of risk factors, vascular interventions etc. The impact of interventions on these processes will also be assessed. It will also involve surveying patient attitudes, illness beliefs and other psycho-social factors and the impact these have on clinical outcomes.

Expected Outcome

Experience gained (in addition to obtaining BMedSci):

1. Insights into research practices within the NHS including governance
2. Understanding the role and value of Clinical Networks
3. Understanding the value of medical databases in conducting research
4. Recruiting, collecting and analysing data for a clinical study (patient contact). Previous students have commented on the tremendous confidence they have gained in how they interact with both patients and other HCPs
5. Results of this study have and will continue to be used to improve national guidelines and policy and the successful BMedSci will gain substantial insight into how clinical research can be used to influence national strategies to improve patient care.
6. An understanding of how to achieve service improvement and the challenges faced when the service bridges primary and secondary care
7. It is expected that the work will result in at least 3-4 first author abstracts and 1-2 publications

Type of Project

Clinical project - based in the clinical environment with patients/including service evaluation

Additional Training

The successful BMedSci student will join a vibrant diabetes team with an active research arm and will be jointly supervised by 2 consultants with specialist expertise in the diabetic foot. Training will be provided in all research techniques and on how clinical research can be applied to directly improve patient care. Students will have weekly meetings with their supervisor to ensure close mentoring and support.

Deconditioning and sarcopaenia after stroke study - DECONSTRCKT

Main Supervisor

Dr Ali Ali (ali.ali@sheffield.ac.uk)

Second Supervisor

Dr Liz Williams (e.a.williams@sheffield.ac.uk)

Other Supervisors

Dr Simon Nichols

Aim and Objectives

To characterise the time course of the development of sarcopaenia after acute stroke and its determinants e.g. stroke severity, disability, physical activity, systemic inflammation and nutritional status.

Research Methodology

Twenty four patients with acute stroke will be recruited from the stroke units at Sheffield. Socio-demographic and clinical details will be recorded. Baseline blood tests for inflammatory markers and muscle markers (IL-6, IL-1, TNFa, IL-10, myostatin, irisin, IGF-1) will be drawn. Participants will undergo a weekly assessment (except ultrasound which will be undertaken every 3 days) of the following characteristics until discharge from hospital:
• Strength and function: grip strength, 5 x chair stand, timed up and go (TUG), gait speed, Barthel Index.
• Systemic inflammation: modified Glasgow prognostic score [Yoshimura 2018] – serum CRP and albumin.
• Nutrition: 24 hour food recall, review of nutritional charts for tube fed patients, Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST).
• Structural: Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), thigh and humeral circumference, quadriceps thickness (muscle ultrasound).

Expected Outcome

Feasibility of undertaking the longitudinal analysis will be confirmed if > 80% of the intended measurements are completed. Longitudinal analysis of changes to muscle strength and function, structure, nutrition and systemic inflammation will be undertaken. Outcomes will be reported descriptively with statistical analysis using repeated measures along a time course (ANOVA) and comparisons from baseline assessment (students paired T-test). Multiple regression analysis will be undertaken to elucidate factors associated with the largest declines in muscle mass and strength.

Type of Project

Clinical project - based in the clinical environment with patients/including service evaluation

Additional Training

Student will receive training on the following:
- Use of muscle ultrasound (Advanced Wellbeing Research Centre)
- Use of bioelectrical impedance analysers
- Blood letting and spinning in preparation for freezing
- Performing ELISA tests on serum
- Use of nutritional software analysis systems (myfood24)
- Various statistical analyses

The effect of non-intubation airway manoeuvres on cervical spine movement after traumatic injury

Main Supervisor

Dr Matthew Wiles (matthew.wiles1@nhs.net)

Second Supervisor

Dr John Andrzejowski (john.andrzejowski@nhs.net)

Aim and Objectives

To determine the effect of non-intubation airway manoeuvres on cervical spine movement after traumatic injury.

Research Methodology

Systematic literature review will be undertaken in accordance with PRISMA guidelines and standards (http://www.prisma-statement.org/PRISMAStatement/PRISMAStatement)

A literature review will be undertaken to identify relevant human studies. Cadaveric, healthy volunteer and patient studies will be eligible for inclusion; manikin-based and animal trials will not be studied. All trials must involve airway intervention (e.g. jaw thrust, face-mask ventilation, supraglottic airway device use) but not tracheal intubation.

The endpoint of interest is a surrogate markers of cervical spine movement and potential spinal cord impingement, namely radiological measurement of space available for cord (SAC). Measurement of spinal cord angulation has been measured in numerous previous studies but does not accurate reflect spinal cord impingement. Identified studies will be critically appraised and graded by two different researchers. It is hoped that the results of the study can used to develop a consensus statement on tracheal intubation after traumatic cervical spine injury. The project is anticipated to take 9 months and we intend to submit to Anaesthesia for publication.

Expected Outcome

This should determine the optimal method for airway management after trauma, which will be of great clinical importance and interest.

Type of Project

Clinical project - based in the clinical environment with patients/including service evaluation

Additional Training

No additional statistical training required beyond the SPSS training provided in the taught course. Systematic review methodology will be taught to the student.

Use of Capsule Endoscopy for the GI tract

Main Supervisor

Professor Reena Sidhu (reenasidhu@nhs.net)

Second Supervisor

Professor Mark McAlindon (mark.mcalindon@nhs.net)

Aim and Objectives

Gastrointestinal BSc projects in the Academic department of Gastroenterology (www.sheffieldgastro.nhs.uk) Introduction: Come and take your BSc year with us – you will love it! 😊

There are numerous research projects to choose from in different areas: endoscopy, capsule endoscopy, inflammatory bowel disease, functional gut disorders, coeliac disease and many, many more. There is flexibility for you to pick - come and chat with us to find out what you would like to do and what is on offer. Every BSc student to date has published (with a PubMed ID – useful for points in future applications). There have been 17x 1st class with honors & 3x 2:1. Every student has received a £1,000 bursary.

Research Methodology

We are the largest Gastroenterology Department in the UK. Currently there are 30 Consultants (6 Professors). As a reflection of being one of the premier UK units we have won 11 Clinical Service Awards (10 National and 1 International) and 9 Clinical Research Awards (6 National and 3 International) in the last decade. We are a thriving and happy department. Objectives: We wish to give you a broad base of research learning in a friendly department with excellent support. Fantastic research opportunities and exposure to clinical practice. Many students also describe that they gained clinical confidence by talking to and recruiting patients as well as working in endoscopy during their project. Methodology: During the intercalation application process, you will have the chance to meet with the consultant supervisors within our department who are offering upcoming projects. You may be working with a database or clinical letters, you may have the opportunity to get involved with departmental recruiting (if you wish) for other studies, you will work alongside our nursing and medical team and will gain clinical skills whilst supporting an endoscopy list.

Expected Outcome

Scientific and medical opportunities: You will have excellent in-house methodological support from your supervisor and clinical fellows within the department. At any given time, there are 2-5 students undertaking BSc projects and up to 5 fellows (doctors who are training to become gastroenterology consultants but undertaking an out of programme experience). This is a close-knit group based on Ward P2 (Royal Hallamshire Hospital) with their own office – which means you have a lot of fun socializing within the department! Every Friday we all have lunch together and presentations at the informal Friday GI Academic Meeting. The unique clinical studies that you will have the opportunity to undertake often lead to changes in clinical practice. You will be well supported in a thriving NHS GI research environment. You may be taking bloods, putting cannulas in, watching gastroscopies or colonoscopies. There is plenty of patient contact and you will feel that you are contributing to the team. Previous students have loved the friendly clinical environment. "My confidence has grown throughout this year both personally and professionally. I now feel able to integrate myself into a clinical team to get more out of clinical placements in the future. I also had a whole year to practice taking bloods/inserting cannulas and talking to patients about procedures. This year has given me the ability to be confident working independently and when presenting to large audiences. It has been a lot of fun!” – Emily Greenaway GI BSc 2021-2022

Type of Project

Clinical project - based in the clinical environment with patients/including service evaluation

Additional Training

Every September you get to attend our ShefGastro annual symposium. This is an all-day gastrofest held at the Crowne Plaza Hotel (Sheffield). You get to watch world class speakers in gastroenterology and on top of all of that there is free food throughout the day! All students have been able to present at our local Friday lunchtime academic meeting, our regional meeting (Bardhan Fellowship, usually held annually in March) and at the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) meetings (usually held annually in June). This means that you are super confident and have overcome the ‘hurdle in our minds’ that presentation can be. This is a medical life skill and being taught presentation skills and presenting in a nurtured environment prepares you for when your own BSc presentation comes around. These opportunities also teach you how to field questions – another valuable medical life skill! Although whilst you read this you will only be thinking (understandably) of ‘what do I get’ in the short-term by doing this GI BSc project. In the long-term, there is a far greater gain. Most of your medical training is didactic but after this experience you will have a more inquisitive mind and this, we promise, will make you a better doctor. You will not just follow medical protocols, but you will personally be able to understand and weigh up the medical science behind your decision making. All students within the department receive a 1K bursary for your 12-month period in research. This allows you to pay for registration at the BSG annual conference, plus travel and hotel accommodation and still have plenty of funds left over for non-alcoholic beverages 😉

Endoscopy & Coeliac Disease

Main Supervisor

Professor David Sanders (david.sanders1@nhs.net)

Second Supervisor

Professor Mark McAlindon (mark.mcalindon@nhs.net)

Aim and Objectives

Gastrointestinal BSc projects in the Academic department of Gastroenterology (www.sheffieldgastro.nhs.uk)
Introduction: Come and take your BSc year with us – you will love it! 😊


There are numerous research projects to choose from in different areas: endoscopy, capsule endoscopy, inflammatory bowel disease, functional gut disorders, coeliac disease and many, many more. There is flexibility for you to pick - come and chat with us to find out what you would like to do and what is on offer. Every BSc student to date has published (with a PubMed ID – useful for points in future applications). There have been 17x 1st class with honors & 3x 2:1. Every student has received a £1,000 bursary.

Research Methodology

We are the largest Gastroenterology Department in the UK. Currently there are 30 Consultants (6 Professors). As a reflection of being one of the premier UK units we have won 11 Clinical Service Awards (10 National and 1 International) and 9 Clinical Research Awards (6 National and 3 International) in the last decade. We are a thriving and happy department.
Objectives: We wish to give you a broad base of research learning in a friendly department with excellent support. Fantastic research opportunities and exposure to clinical practice. Many students also describe that they gained clinical confidence by talking to and recruiting patients as well as working in endoscopy during their project.
Methodology: During the intercalation application process, you will have the chance to meet with the consultant supervisors within our department who are offering upcoming projects. You may be working with a database or clinical letters, you may have the opportunity to get involved with departmental recruiting (if you wish) for other studies, you will work alongside our nursing and medical team and will gain clinical skills whilst supporting an endoscopy list.

Expected Outcome

Scientific and medical opportunities:
You will have excellent in-house methodological support from your supervisor and clinical fellows within the department.
At any given time, there are 2-5 students undertaking BSc projects and up to 5 fellows (doctors who are training to become gastroenterology consultants but undertaking an out of programme experience). This is a close-knit group based on Ward P2 (Royal Hallamshire Hospital) with their own office – which means you have a lot of fun socializing within the department! Every Friday we all have lunch together and presentations at the informal Friday GI Academic Meeting.
The unique clinical studies that you will have the opportunity to undertake often lead to changes in clinical practice. You will be well supported in a thriving NHS GI research environment. You may be taking bloods, putting cannulas in, watching gastroscopies or colonoscopies. There is plenty of patient contact and you will feel that you are contributing to the team. Previous students have loved the friendly clinical environment.
"My confidence has grown throughout this year both personally and professionally. I now feel able to integrate myself into a clinical team to get more out of clinical placements in the future. I also had a whole year to practice taking bloods/inserting cannulas and talking to patients about procedures. This year has given me the ability to be confident working independently and when presenting to large audiences. It has been a lot of fun!” – Emily Greenaway GI BSc 2021-2022

Type of Project

Clinical project - based in the clinical environment with patients/including service evaluation

Additional Training

Every September you get to attend our ShefGastro annual symposium. This is an all-day gastrofest held at the Crowne Plaza Hotel (Sheffield). You get to watch world class speakers in gastroenterology and on top of all of that there is free food throughout the day!
All students have been able to present at our local Friday lunchtime academic meeting, our regional meeting (Bardhan Fellowship, usually held annually in March) and at the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) meetings (usually held annually in June).
This means that you are super confident and have overcome the ‘hurdle in our minds’ that presentation can be. This is a medical life skill and being taught presentation skills and presenting in a nurtured environment prepares you for when your own BSc presentation comes around. These opportunities also teach you how to field questions – another valuable medical life skill!
Although whilst you read this you will only be thinking (understandably) of ‘what do I get’ in the short-term by doing this GI BSc project. In the long-term, there is a far greater gain. Most of your medical training is didactic but after this experience you will have a more inquisitive mind and this, we promise, will make you a better doctor. You will not just follow medical protocols, but you will personally be able to understand and weigh up the medical science behind your decision making.
All students within the department receive a 1K bursary for your 12-month period in research. This allows you to pay for registration at the BSG annual conference, plus travel and hotel accommodation and still have plenty of funds left over for non-alcoholic beverages 😉

Loneliness and Resilience in IBD

Main Supervisor

Dr Alenka Brooks (a.j.brooks@shef.ac.uk)

Second Supervisor

Dr Georgina Rowse (g.rowse@shef.ac.uk)

Aim and Objectives

To understand the lived experience of loneliness in young people with Inflammatory Bowel Disease, and how young people cope with these experiences.

Research Methodology

This is a qualitative study and will aim to recruit 10-15 participants for semi-structured interviews, which may be conducted face to face to via video conference. The transcripts of these interviews will be analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis resulting in rich data. The resultant themes, quality of the data/analysis, reflexivity and implications will be considered in the write up.

Expected Outcome

The outcome will be a paper describing the lived experience of young people with IBD in relation to loneliness and social networks, this will be via outlining the resultant themes from the interviews and analysis. The paper will include consideration of the clinical implications of the findings in terms of mental health, clinical management and service delivery.

Type of Project

Qualitative Project/non-lab based - primarily using qualitative methods

Additional Training

The student will receive training in the introduction to qualitative research methods, and the specifically the analytic method of Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). The student will receive regular, in-depth analytical supervision to support the conduct of IPA.

Reducing Emergency Admissions in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)

Main Supervisor

Professor Alan Lobo (alan.lobo@nhs.net)

Second Supervisor

Professor Dan Hind (d.hind@sheffield.ac.uk)

Aim and Objectives

1) To understand the reasons for emergency hospital admission in patients with IBD
2) Use literature review, semi-structured interviews and routine data to identify prototypes of emergency admissions in IBD.

Every emergency admission represents a system failure in terms of the IBD Standards and poor access to biologics or elective admissions in poor, migrant and minority communities are leading to greater delays and worse outcomes.

Our hypothesis is that mixed-methods research and multidisciplinary partnership working approach can produce actionable knowledge capable of reducing emergency admissions for IBD.

Research Methodology

A mixed-methods study allowing development of skills in qualitative approaches including semi-structured interviews and statistical analysis. This will involve direct and in-depth patient contact and an understanding of hospital admission for IBD as a system failure.

1. Mapping review of literature on acute and emergency admissions to identifiable modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors.
2. Semi-structured interviews with clinicians with findings presented as Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) tables - a structured approach to risk assessment in which multidisciplinary teams map out high-risk processes of care, identifying potential failures, and characterising each in terms of likelihood, magnitude of consequences and detectability.
3. Similar semi-structured interviews with patients to gain perspective on episodes resulting in admission.
4. A pilot study using case-tracking profiles for emergency admissions

The candidate will use literature review, social science theory, semi-structured interviews and routine data.

Expected Outcome

Outcomes will include:
- a publishable mapping literature review
- publishable qualitative studies in professionals and patients organised into FMEA tables
- case-tracking profiles for admitted IBD patients to identify prototypes of emergency admissions

All will form the basis for a service improvement programme and a more extensive research programme - with which the student could remain involved

Type of Project

Clinical project - based in the clinical environment with patients/including service evaluation

Additional Training

The student will be part of a research team supported by supervisors

Effect of remote ischaemic preconditioning on walking in people with lower limb amputations: a feasibility randomised controlled trial

Main Supervisor

Dr Rohit Bhide (rohit.bhide@nhs.net)

Second Supervisor

Dr Siva Nair (siva.nair@nhs.net)

Aim and Objectives

1- Is it feasible to undertake a randomised controlled trial of remote ischaemic preconditioning (RIPC) vs Sham in individuals with lower limb amputations?
2- Do amputees find RIPC acceptable?
3- Is one episode of RIPC intervention enough to improve walking parameters in people with lower limb amputations?

Research Methodology

Amputee patients spend more energy during walking than able-bodied persons. Any intervention which reduces fatigue and/or improves endurance will aid prosthetic rehabilitation and daily activities. RIPC has demonstrated promising results in other patient populations (MS, Stroke, Diabetes Mellitus). This study will assess whether RIPC improves walking parameters in individuals with lower limb amputations (transtibial/ transfemoral) when compared to a sham intervention. It will be a feasibility study to gather data and information which will later support a grant application for a larger study.


Selected candidate will spearhead this project and will be responsible for identifying patients, obtaining informed consent, administering the intervention (RIPC vs Sham) and recording outcome measures. There will be ample supervisory support throughout the project. There will be support in place to guide the candidate during the writing phase, assist with statistical analyses and for submission of the manuscript to a peer-reviewed journal.

Expected Outcome

Outcome measures:
Primary -
Study feasibility will be assessed by pre-defined criteria for safety, acceptability and success. Safety will be defined as the absence of any serious adverse events related to the intervention. IPC will be considered acceptable if less than 1/3rd of patients report discomfort / other side effects in their exit interviews. Success criteria will be met if the full complement of recordings is achieved for 85% of individuals.

Secondary -
This will assess percentage changes in the ambulatory / walking parameters (6 minute walk test, timed up and go test) assessed at baseline and following intervention (either IPC or and sham). The aim will be to generate data to inform future study sample size & design for a larger study.

Type of Project

Clinical project - based in the clinical environment with patients/including service evaluation

Additional Training

Students will have the opportunity to be involved and interact with patients throughout the study. They will learn about lower limb amputations (causes, demographics), biomechanics, musculoskeletal medicine, different prosthetic options, principles of prosthetic rehabilitation and expected outcomes.

Development of Standardised Guidelines in Thoracic Aortic Imaging

Main Supervisor

Dr Stephen Goode (stephen.goode3@nhs.net)

Second Supervisor

Miss Saima Ehsan (saima.ehsan@nhs.net)

Third Supervisor

Dr Mark Regi

Aim and Objectives

The aim of this project is to develop definitive follow up guidelines for thoracic aortic imaging in patients with aneurysmal disease. We will collate long term imaging follow up data on patients with aneurysmal thoracic aortic disease and also those with treated ascending aortic aneurysmal disease for the purposes of interpretation and analysis.

Research Methodology

We will being using mixed qualitative and quantitative methodology. We will identify patients with long term follow MR angiographic imaging in 2 main cohorts:

  1. Patients with ascending aortic aneurysmal disease
  2. Patients with operated ascending aortic disease

We will then collate their imaging follow up parameters from MR angiographic thoracic aortic imaging measurements. As well as this demographic data, vascular risk factors, operations, short and long term complications will be recorded. A questionnaire based Quality of life assessment will be undertaken using virtual phone based consultation to look at the impact of long term imaging follow up.

Expected Outcome

This project will provide important long term data on thoracic aortic disease and will help us to develop and publish national guidelines to help guide national imaging follow up. We plan to present these findings at national and international conferences on thoracic aortic disease and also to publish our data into peer reviewed publications.

Additional Training

This project is a mixed method clinical study with emphasis on thoracic aortic imaging as well as a phone based questionnaire. This project will predominantly be office based image interpretation and analysis, data collation and statistical analysis. Students taking up this project will be trained in thoracic aortic imaging interpretation and analysis on basic PACS imaging workstation and but also high level Terarecon reformatting software.

Type of Project

Qualitative Project/non-lab based - primarily using qualitative methods

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