Sheffield Teaching Hospitals Trust projects

Intercalated BSc Medical Sciences Research available projects

The Hallamshire Hospital.
Off

Projects:

Loneliness and Resilience in IBD

Main Supervisor

Dr Alenka Brooks (a.j.brooks@shef.ac.uk)

Second Supervisor

Dr Georgina Rowse (g.rowse@shef.ac.uk)

Aim and Objectives

To understand the lived experience of loneliness in young people with Inflammatory Bowel Disease, and how young people cope with these experiences.

Research Methodology

This is a qualitative study and will aim to recruit 10-15 participants for semi-structured interviews, which may be conducted face to face to via video conference. The transcripts of these interviews will be analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis resulting in rich data. The resultant themes, quality of the data/analysis, reflexivity and implications will be considered in the write up.

Expected Outcome

The outcome will be a paper describing the lived experience of young people with IBD in relation to loneliness and social networks, this will be via outlining the resultant themes from the interviews and analysis. The paper will include consideration of the clinical implications of the findings in terms of mental health, clinical management and service delivery.

Type of Project

Qualitative Project/non-lab based - primarily using qualitative methods

Additional Training

The student will receive training in the introduction to qualitative research methods, and the specifically the analytic method of Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). The student will receive regular, in-depth analytical supervision to support the conduct of IPA.

Reducing Emergency Admissions in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)

Main Supervisor

Professor Alan Lobo (alan.lobo@nhs.net)

Second Supervisor

Professor Dan Hind (d.hind@sheffield.ac.uk)

Aim and Objectives

1) To understand the reasons for emergency hospital admission in patients with IBD
2) Use literature review, semi-structured interviews and routine data to identify prototypes of emergency admissions in IBD.

Every emergency admission represents a system failure in terms of the IBD Standards and poor access to biologics or elective admissions in poor, migrant and minority communities are leading to greater delays and worse outcomes.

Our hypothesis is that mixed-methods research and multidisciplinary partnership working approach can produce actionable knowledge capable of reducing emergency admissions for IBD.

Research Methodology

A mixed-methods study allowing development of skills in qualitative approaches including semi-structured interviews and statistical analysis. This will involve direct and in-depth patient contact and an understanding of hospital admission for IBD as a system failure.

1. Mapping review of literature on acute and emergency admissions to identifiable modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors.
2. Semi-structured interviews with clinicians with findings presented as Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) tables - a structured approach to risk assessment in which multidisciplinary teams map out high-risk processes of care, identifying potential failures, and characterising each in terms of likelihood, magnitude of consequences and detectability.
3. Similar semi-structured interviews with patients to gain perspective on episodes resulting in admission.
4. A pilot study using case-tracking profiles for emergency admissions

The candidate will use literature review, social science theory, semi-structured interviews and routine data.

Expected Outcome

Outcomes will include:
- a publishable mapping literature review
- publishable qualitative studies in professionals and patients organised into FMEA tables
- case-tracking profiles for admitted IBD patients to identify prototypes of emergency admissions

All will form the basis for a service improvement programme and a more extensive research programme - with which the student could remain involved

Type of Project

Clinical project - based in the clinical environment with patients/including service evaluation

Additional Training

The student will be part of a research team supported by supervisors

Effect of remote ischaemic preconditioning on walking in people with lower limb amputations: a feasibility randomised controlled trial

Main Supervisor

Dr Rohit Bhide (rohit.bhide@nhs.net)

Second Supervisor

Dr Siva Nair (siva.nair@nhs.net)

Aim and Objectives

1- Is it feasible to undertake a randomised controlled trial of remote ischaemic preconditioning (RIPC) vs Sham in individuals with lower limb amputations?
2- Do amputees find RIPC acceptable?
3- Is one episode of RIPC intervention enough to improve walking parameters in people with lower limb amputations?

Research Methodology

Amputee patients spend more energy during walking than able-bodied persons. Any intervention which reduces fatigue and/or improves endurance will aid prosthetic rehabilitation and daily activities. RIPC has demonstrated promising results in other patient populations (MS, Stroke, Diabetes Mellitus). This study will assess whether RIPC improves walking parameters in individuals with lower limb amputations (transtibial/ transfemoral) when compared to a sham intervention. It will be a feasibility study to gather data and information which will later support a grant application for a larger study.


Selected candidate will spearhead this project and will be responsible for identifying patients, obtaining informed consent, administering the intervention (RIPC vs Sham) and recording outcome measures. There will be ample supervisory support throughout the project. There will be support in place to guide the candidate during the writing phase, assist with statistical analyses and for submission of the manuscript to a peer-reviewed journal.

Expected Outcome

Outcome measures:
Primary -
Study feasibility will be assessed by pre-defined criteria for safety, acceptability and success. Safety will be defined as the absence of any serious adverse events related to the intervention. IPC will be considered acceptable if less than 1/3rd of patients report discomfort / other side effects in their exit interviews. Success criteria will be met if the full complement of recordings is achieved for 85% of individuals.

Secondary -
This will assess percentage changes in the ambulatory / walking parameters (6 minute walk test, timed up and go test) assessed at baseline and following intervention (either IPC or and sham). The aim will be to generate data to inform future study sample size & design for a larger study.

Type of Project

Clinical project - based in the clinical environment with patients/including service evaluation

Additional Training

Students will have the opportunity to be involved and interact with patients throughout the study. They will learn about lower limb amputations (causes, demographics), biomechanics, musculoskeletal medicine, different prosthetic options, principles of prosthetic rehabilitation and expected outcomes.

Development of Standardised Guidelines in Thoracic Aortic Imaging

Main Supervisor

Dr Stephen Goode (stephen.goode3@nhs.net)

Second Supervisor

Miss Saima Ehsan (saima.ehsan@nhs.net)

Third Supervisor

Dr Mark Regi

Aim and Objectives

The aim of this project is to develop definitive follow up guidelines for thoracic aortic imaging in patients with aneurysmal disease. We will collate long term imaging follow up data on patients with aneurysmal thoracic aortic disease and also those with treated ascending aortic aneurysmal disease for the purposes of interpretation and analysis.

Research Methodology

We will being using mixed qualitative and quantitative methodology. We will identify patients with long term follow MR angiographic imaging in 2 main cohorts:

  1. Patients with ascending aortic aneurysmal disease
  2. Patients with operated ascending aortic disease

We will then collate their imaging follow up parameters from MR angiographic thoracic aortic imaging measurements. As well as this demographic data, vascular risk factors, operations, short and long term complications will be recorded. A questionnaire based Quality of life assessment will be undertaken using virtual phone based consultation to look at the impact of long term imaging follow up.

Expected Outcome

This project will provide important long term data on thoracic aortic disease and will help us to develop and publish national guidelines to help guide national imaging follow up. We plan to present these findings at national and international conferences on thoracic aortic disease and also to publish our data into peer reviewed publications.

Additional Training

This project is a mixed method clinical study with emphasis on thoracic aortic imaging as well as a phone based questionnaire. This project will predominantly be office based image interpretation and analysis, data collation and statistical analysis. Students taking up this project will be trained in thoracic aortic imaging interpretation and analysis on basic PACS imaging workstation and but also high level Terarecon reformatting software.

Type of Project

Qualitative Project/non-lab based - primarily using qualitative methods

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