Professor Rosaleen Duffy

Department of Politics and International Relations

Chair of International Politics

Profile image for academic staff member Rosaleen Duffy
r.v.duffy@sheffield.ac.uk

Full contact details

Professor Rosaleen Duffy
Department of Politics and International Relations
Crick Centre
Elmfield Building
Northumberland Road
Sheffield
S10 2TU
Profile

Rosaleen Duffy joined the department in September 2016, having previously held posts at SOAS University of London, University of Manchester and University of Lancaster.

Rosaleen uses a political ecology lens in order to understand global environmental change. She is particularly interested in the global politics of biodiversity conservation, and focuses on global environmental governance, wildlife trafficking, poaching, transfrontier conservation and tourism. Recently, her work has sought to understand the growing links between global security and biodiversity conservation. In 2016 she was awarded a European Research Council Advanced Investigator Grant for BIOSEC - Biodiversity and Security: Understanding environmental crime, illegal wildlife trade and threat finance. She is currently leading the ESRC funded Beastly Business project, which examines green crime, political ecology and illegal wildlife trade in European species.

She is a fellow of the inter-disciplinary Sheffield Institute for International Development (SIID) and a member of the Sheffield Animals Research Colloquium (ShARC) and the international Political Ecology Network (POLLEN).

Research interests

My main research interests are political ecology, global environmental governance, biodiversity conservation, transfrontier conservation, tourism/ecotourism, wildlife trafficking, poaching and security.

In 2016-2020 I led the EUR 1.8 million ERC funded BIOSEC project, which focused in understanding the implications of the integration of conservation with security concerns, especially in tackling illegal wildlife trade.

In 2021-2023, I am PI on the Beastly Business Project, funded by an ESRC grant of £859,000 to examine green crime, political ecology and illegal wildlife trade in European species. The team consists of Co-I Prof Charlie Burns, project manager Liz Ungureanu, and researchers Dr George Iordachescu, Dr Teresa Lappe-Osthege and Dr Laura Gutiérrez. 

Beastly Business Project Twitter

Prizes/awards

  • 2018 Elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences.
  • 2011 Distinguished Achievement Award, President’s Medal for Researcher of the Year, University of Manchester.
  • 2011 Elected Fellow of the Society of Biology, in recognition of research excellence and outstanding contribution to public understanding of science.
Publications

Journal articles

Research group

I am a member of the Environmental Politics Research group.

I welcome PhD proposals on topics linked to:

  • Biodiversity conservation
  • Global environmental change
  • Political ecology
Grants

Principal Investigator, UKRI, ESRC grant of £900,000, for Beastly Business: Examining the illegal trade in Bears, Eels and Songbirds (April 2021- July 2023) Co-I Prof Charlotte Burns (University of Sheffield). The project has 3 post doctoral fellows and a project manager. https://BeastlyBusiness.org  @BeastlyProject.


Co-I GCRF UKRI/ Newton Agile Response Fund Grant of £300,000, for COVID-19 and the trade in wildlife: Investigating the implications of the pandemic for wildlife supply chains and wildlife trade livelihoods (August 2020-August 2022). Led by Dr. Brock Bersaglio (University of Birmingham), Dr. Charis Enns (University of Manchester) and Dr Francis Massé (University of Northumbria). https://wildlifetradefutures.com @Wildlife_Trade.


Co-I with Professor Dan Brockington, Global Challenges Research Fund UKRI Post Doctoral Fellowship July 2019-July 2021. Awarded to Dr Elaine Hsiao to research environmental peacebuilding in Central Africa. Value £100,000.


Principal Investigator, ERC Advanced Investigator Grant of EURO 1.8 million, BIOSEC: Biodiversity and Security: understanding environmental crime, illegal wildlife trade and threat finance (01.09.16-31.08.20). The project had two PhD students, 5 Post doctoral fellows and a project manager. https://biosec.group.shef.ac.uk @biosec_erc.


Co-I TS2 NORFACE - Belmont Forum grant of EUR 1.2 million for CON-VIVA: Towards Convivial Conservation: Governing Human-Wildlife Interactions in the Anthropocene (2018-2022) led by Prof Bram Büscher and Dr Rob Fletcher (University of Wageningen) https://conviva-research.com/ @convivconserv .


Co-I with Professor Dan Brockington, Max Bateley Post Doctoral Fellowship in Sustainable Peace, 01.02.17- 31.01.19. Awarded to Dr Esther Marijnen to research environments change and rebel movements in Central Africa. Value:  £100,000.


Principal Investigator, Leverhulme Visiting Professorship for Giorgos Kallis 01.04.15-31.03.16 value £84,036.


Principal Investigator, ESRC grant of £94,000 (ESRC reference RES-000-22-2599) Neoliberalising Nature? A Comparative Analysis of Asian and African Elephant Based Ecotourism (Dec 2007-October 2008).


Member, Leverhulme Trust International Collaborative Network grant of £95,000. Transnational Climate Change Governance (Principal Grant Holder, Professor Harriet Bulkeley, Geography Department, Durham University).


Principal Investigator, ESRC grant of £42,000 (ESRC reference RES-000-22-0342) Global Environmental Governance and Local Resistances. Oct. 2003-July 2004.


Principal Investigator, ESRC grant of £39,919 (ESRC reference R000223013) ‘The Geopolitics of Bioregions: Conservation and Erosion of National Boundaries’. (Oct. 1999 to Oct. 2000).

Teaching activities

My teaching practice is very interactive - classes are built around a range of different activities which include group tasks, practical exercises, close reading/critiques of key writings, as well as mini-lectures. The aim is to develop opportunities for thorough reflection on the ways we understand and approach global environmental change - this means we critically analyse commonly accepted terms and practices such as Anthropocene, carbon trading, payments for ecosystem services, resource conflicts, population growth and natural capital; using a political ecology lens, we try to uncover the uneven distribution of the negative consequences of global environmental change.

Course

POLI6602 The Political Economy of Global Environmental Change