Funding support

The Department of Archaeology benefits from a number of grants and scholarships to support your learning or research.

Two students discussing bones in lab
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This page covers funding support specific to the Department of Archaeology. Visit the links below for general information on tuition fees and funding:


Undergraduate funding

Petrie Watson grants

Open to all students in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities, this fund awards grants of up to £750 for projects which enhance or complement students' programme of study, including such activities as:

  • taking part in a programme of study either in the UK or abroad
  • attending vacation courses, summer schools or masterclasses
  • attending a conference
  • taking part in a field school
  • undertaking research
Derrick Riley Fund grants

The Derrick Riley Fund was established in 1994 to foster and support the study of aerial archaeology by young scholars. It provides grants to undergraduate and postgraduate students in the UK and overseas to fund research and further training in aerial archaeology. A maximum of £500 will be available each year to be split between one or more awards. The grants will support students currently following a degree-level course to undertake either independent research involving aerial archaeology (including undergraduate and postgraduate dissertations) or training in aerial archaeology (for instance, attending a workshop, work placement or a conference). Eligible expenses include travel, accommodation, consumables and conference/workshop fees. Activities funded by the grant must be completed within the calendar year in which the grant is awarded.

Applicants should complete the application form and send it by email to r.johnston@sheffield.ac.uk. A reference is also required in support of the application. This should be written by someone who can comment on the quality of the applicant’s academic work and the value of the project. The yearly deadline for applications is 1 March. Applications received after this date will not be considered until the following year.

Application form (Word Doc, 119kb)


Postgraduate funding

White Rose College of the Arts and Humanities (WRoCAH) Studentships and Scholarships

The University of Sheffield is part of the AHRC-funded White Rose College of the Arts and Humanities (WRoCAH) with the Universities of Leeds and York. Each University in this network offers WRoCAH masters studentships for students undertaking taught or research-based masters programmes, but who aspire to complete a doctoral research degree on successfully completing their masters. Find out more and how to apply here.

Fulbright Scholarship

The University of Sheffield is a recognised institution for the Fulbright Scholarship. The All Disciplines Award can be applied to any master's or doctoral degree at any recognised UK university, as well as for independent research projects. Find out more.

Wellcome Trust Masters Awards

Suitable only for applicants to the MSc Osteoarchaeology and MSc Human Osteology & Funerary Archaeology programmes

Further information is available on the Wellcome Trust website

The Robert Kiln Scholarship for Landscape Archaeology

A scholarship of £1,600 awarded to a UK / EU / Overseas applicant to the MA Landscape Archaeology programme. This award was founded in memory of Robert Kiln, Honorary graduate of the University of Sheffield and sponsor of the Robert Kiln Laboratory for Landscape Archaeology.

Applicants who hold an offer of a place to study commencing 28 September 2020 by 1 August 2020 will be automatically considered for this award.  The successful candidate will be contacted in early September.

The Marek Zvelebil Scholarship for Human Osteology and Funerary Archaeology

A £1,000 scholarship providing support to an excellent UK / EU /Overseas student applying to study for the MSc Human Osteology and Funerary Archaeology. The scholarship is named in honour of the late Professor Zvelebil, who began his career in Sheffield as a BA Archaeology student and was an influential member of academic staff from 1981 until his death in 2011.

Applicants who hold an offer of a place to study commencing 28 September 2020 by 1 August 2020 will be automatically considered for this award.  The successful candidate will be contacted in early September.

Andrew Sherratt Fund

This fund assists current postgraduate students carrying out research in Old World Prehistory, from academic institutions anywhere in the world, to travel or gain access to resources that would otherwise be unavailable to them. Grants of up to £1,000 are awarded.

Marshall Scholarships (US citizens only)

Up to 40 scholarships are awarded each year, covering tuition fees and a stipend plus other benefits. Visit the Marshall Scholarships website

Arts & Humanities Faculty Funding

Full and partial scholarships available for UK, EU and International Students. Find out more. 

Department of Archaeology Scholarships

A £1,000 scholarship providing tuition fee support to an excellent UK / EU /Overseas student applying to study for the MSc Archaeological Science.
Suitable only for applicants to the MSc Archaeological Science programme.

A £1,000 scholarship providing tuition fee support to an excellent UK / EU /Overseas student applying to study for the MA Heritage and Archaeology
Suitable only for applicants to the MA Heritage and Archaeology programme.

£1,000 scholarship providing tuition fee support to an excellent UK / EU /Overseas student applying to study for the MA  Archaeology
Suitable only for applicants to the MA Archaeology programme.

Applicants must:

  • have an academic offer from us to study full-time, scheduled to commence in September 2020
  • achieve a 2.1 from a university in the UK, or an equivalent qualification from a good institution overseas
  • have an application number
  • be self funded, and required to pay the overseas tuition fee if an international student 
  • not be a sponsored student
  • provide a supporting paragraph statement to evidence excellence

How to apply

You must complete the application form and provide a supporting statement evidencing your excellence and suitability for the scholarship.

The deadline for applications is 26 June 2020.

Scholarship applications will be considered together with your application for admission.

Successful applicants will be notified before the end of July.

PhD Studentships

AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnership PhD in Archaeology: An interdisciplinary exploration of the social impact of foetal and perinatal mortality during the industrialisation of England

Application Deadline- 1st May 2020

Recent archaeological excavations of urban cemeteries have driven ambitious agendas to engage with the social, cultural and economic transitions of industrialisation. The lives of women and children have come under new scrutiny in the writing of inclusive and representative narratives of health, occupation and family life. This Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) Collaborative Doctoral Partnership (CDP) project explores how urbanisation affected family dynamics by focusing on the many infants who did not survive the hardships of Industrial-period life. By focusing on the death rituals used to mediate loss and grief, a range of issues in the histories of family, reproduction and emotion can be examined through the lens of archaeologies of childhood.

Funerary and osteological assessments of burials of Industrial-period infants appear in numerous reports arising from commercial archaeological excavations, including a substantial number of reports by MOLA. This evidence has received limited synthetic study, and a wider contextual narrative needs to be constructed – a social and cultural understanding of foetal and perinatal death. 

This project will evaluate the impact of industrialisation on responses to foetal and perinatal loss, illuminating the effect of urbanisation on the 18th-19th century English family. Potential research questions include:

  • How were foetuses and perinates commemorated in urban cemeteries dating to the 18th-19th centuries compared to adults? To what extent did they appear in vaults, tombs, crypts and other different forms of burial?
  • To what extent were the very young included/excluded from the burial community? How widespread were the spatial zoning of burials or ‘clandestine’ burials of infants in adult graves and what might these practices tell us about responses to death of young children?
  • Did social status and religious affiliation affect the responses to foetal and infant loss in urban communities? 
  • To what extent is there evidence for non-burial treatments of foetal and perinatal remains, for example abandonment or anatomisation, and what are the implications for perceptions of the value of very young lives? 

These are potential research questions for the student to undertake; the successful applicant will be able to shape the PhD with the support of the student’s supervisors.

This project will be jointly supervised by Dr Lizzy Craig-Atkins (Archaeology, University of Sheffield) and Robert Hartle (MOLA), with support from Dr Chris Millard (History, University of Sheffield) and Diego Rodrigo-Maganto (MOLA) The student will be expected to spend time at both Sheffield and MOLA, as well as becoming part of the wider cohort of CDP funded students across the UK. 

Funding notes: 

AHRC CDP doctoral training grants fund full-time studentships for 45 months (or part-time equivalent). The studentship has the possibility of being extended for an additional 3 months to provide professional development opportunities, or up to 3 months of funding may be used to pay for the costs the student might incur in taking up professional development opportunities. 

The studentship covers  (i) a tax-free annual stipend at the standard Research Council rate (£15,285 for 2020-2021), (ii) an allowance of £1000/year to enable collaboration with the partner organisation (as they are based in London), (iii) an additional allowance of £1000/year for expenses incurred in undertaking research, and (iv) tuition fees at the UK/EU rate.

Candidates must have a relevant connection with the UK to qualify for a full AHRC award, i.e. they must have been ordinarily resident in the UK throughout the three-year period preceding the date of application, or have settled status in the UK. Non-EU candidates who have not been ordinarily resident in the UK for the last three years, or who were resident wholly or mainly for the purposes of education, are not eligible to apply.

Candidates from EU countries are eligible for full awards if they have been resident in the UK, for education or other purposes, for at least three years prior to the start of their programme. Candidates from EU countries who have not resided in the UK for three years prior to the start of their programme will normally be eligible for a fees-only award.

Entry requirements:

Students with, or expecting to gain, at least an Upper Second Class Honours degree, or equivalent, are invited to apply. The interdisciplinary nature of this research project means that we welcome applications from students with backgrounds in any relevant subject that provides the necessary skills, knowledge and experience for the project, including archaeology, anthropology and history. We endeavour to be inclusive and flexible regarding applicants with caring obligations, disabilities and other considerations.

Inclusion at Sheffield is everyone's responsibility. Our vision is to build a University community that actively attracts, engages and develops talented individuals from many different backgrounds.

We are also proud of our award-winning equality, diversity and inclusion action, and 90% of staff tell us they are treated with fairness and respect (staff survey 2018). We continue working to create a full inclusive environment where everyone can flourish.
 
To find out more visit- www.sheffield.ac.uk/inclusion 

How to apply:

Application is by covering letter, CV and online application form, and should be made through the University of Sheffield online application system.

Please consult the general guidance on how to apply for an Archaeology PhD place in the Department of Archaeology at the University of Sheffield. Please note that two references must be submitted with the application, and take particular care to indicate in the application the broad areas of research that you are interested in and how you feel you could develop the project.

All prospective students are strongly advised to first make informal contact with the supervisor, Dr Lizzy Craig-Atkins

Further Enquiries

For further enquiries, please contact Lizzy Craig-Atkins
 

AHRC CDP Studentship – A window onto the medieval world: illuminating the role of the English glass industry in glazing between AD 1100-1600

The University of Sheffield and Historic England are pleased to announce the opportunity for a fully funded collaborative doctoral partnership student to examine the changing nature and fortunes of the British glass industry in the 12th to 16th centuries. The studentship will be supported under the AHRC’s Collaborative Doctoral Partnerships scheme, and aims to develop research skills whilst providing valuable experience of professional practice in the heritage sector.

This project will be jointly supervised by Professor Caroline Jackson (Archaeology, University of Sheffield) and Dr Sarah Paynter (Historic England), with support from Dr Rachel Tyson (glass scholar). The student will be enrolled at, and receive their PhD from the University of Sheffield, but will be expected to spend time at both Sheffield and Historic England (Portsmouth), as well as becoming part of the wider cohort of CDP funded students across the UK. 

The PhD project provides an exciting opportunity to develop an inter-disciplinary approach to medieval glass in order to understand the market for English and imported Continental glass during the 12th-16th centuries. The study will focus on unpublished assemblages of window glass from nationally significant sites held by Historic England. The student will gain experience in identifying and recording glass assemblages, formulating and answering topical research questions, working within a dynamic research team, disseminating their findings through outreach, conferences, and publications, and engaging with the public, academic, research and archaeological communities. The successful candidate will have access to the facilities at Historic England’s materials science laboratories and the Department of Archaeology at Sheffield University, as well as archaeological archives.

Project description

The 12th-16th centuries was a period of rapid change for crafts and industries in England, greatly influenced by the exchange of ideas, materials and people with continental Europe. This period is fundamental to understanding the nascent English glass-making industry and its subsequent development, encompassing great advances in glazed architecture and new technologies introduced by continental glassworkers, but also the impact of the Black Death, Reformation, and the Dissolution of the Monasteries.

Little is known about the use of English window glass predating the 16th century. By combining different archaeological research methodologies, including chemical analysis, this studentship provides the opportunity to identify patterns of use for English-made glass from the main manufacturing regions in the Weald and Staffordshire, thereby illuminating the fluctuating fortunes of the English glass industry over time relative to continental counterparts. The student will examine manufacturing methods, decorative schemes and condition, and explore documentary and archaeological evidence. The student will also be trained in experimental glassmaking and analysis techniques, such as portable XRF and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) with Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (EDS).

The student will have the flexibility to develop strategies and methodologies to explore key questions, including:

  • What proportion of English-made (regional) glass was used in high status English buildings, ecclesiastical and non-ecclesiastical?
  • How does the pattern of supply change over time, and why (socio-economic/political events, building history, immigration and new technology, economies of production)?
  • What factors might influence the glazier’s choice of glass (affiliations with the Continent, cost, colour, quality, proximity to markets or glass producing regions)?

The award

CDP doctoral training grants fund full-time studentships for 45 months (3.75 years) or part-time equivalent. The studentship has the possibility of being extended for an additional 3 months, with funding, to provide professional development opportunities, or up to 3 months of funding may be used to pay for costs the student might incur in taking up development opportunities.   

The award covers (i) a tax-free annual National Minimum Doctoral stipend at the standard Research Council rate (£15,285 for 2020-2021) plus a CDP maintenance payment of £600/year, (ii) an additional allowance of £1000/year from Historic England for travel and related expenses incurred in undertaking research, and (iii) tuition fees up to the value of the full-time home/EU UKRI rate for PhD degrees (Indicative Fee Level for 2020/21 is £4,407). Further details can be found on the UKRI website

Candidates must have a relevant connection with the UK to qualify for a full AHRC award, i.e. they must have been ordinarily resident in the UK throughout the three-year period preceding the date of application, or have settled status in the UK. Non-EU candidates who have not been ordinarily resident in the UK for the last three years, or who were resident wholly or mainly for the purposes of education, are not eligible to apply.

Candidates from EU countries are eligible for full awards if they have been resident in the UK, for education or other purposes, for at least three years prior to the start of their programme. Candidates from EU countries who have not resided in the UK for three years prior to the start of their programme will normally be eligible for a fees-only award. Further details can be found here

The project can be undertaken on a full-time or part-time basis. We anticipate a start date of October 2020, dependent upon government and AHRC coronavirus advice.

Entry requirements:

Students with, or expecting to gain, at least an Upper Second Class Honours degree, or equivalent, are invited to apply. The interdisciplinary nature of this research project means that we welcome applications from students with backgrounds in any subject that provides relevant skills, knowledge or experience, including Archaeology, Archaeological Science, STEM subject areas (Chemistry, Physics, Materials Science, Geology), History, Museum studies, and Conservation, along with a willingness to work across disciplines. We endeavour to be inclusive and flexible regarding applicants with caring obligations, disabilities and other considerations.

Inclusion at Sheffield is everyone's responsibility. Our vision is to build a University community that actively attracts, engages and develops talented individuals from many different backgrounds. We are also proud of our award-winning equality, diversity and inclusion action, and 90% of staff tell us they are treated with fairness and respect (staff survey 2018). We continue working to create a full inclusive environment where everyone can flourish. To find out more visit the Inclusion at Sheffield page.

How to apply

Application is by covering letter, CV and online application form, and should be made through the University of Sheffield online application system.

Please consult the general guidance on how to apply for an Archaeology PhD place in the Department of Archaeology at the University of Sheffield. Please note that two references must be submitted with the application, and take particular care to indicate in the application the broad areas of research that you are interested in and how you feel you could develop the project.

The closing date for applications is 29th May 2020. Interviews may take place by skype or similar (depending on the current coronavirus government advice).

The successful candidate will be eligible to participate in CDP Cohort Development events. All new CDP students will be expected to attend the CDP Student Launch Event on Monday 21st September 2020 at the British Museum.

For more information about this project contact Prof Caroline Jackson or Dr Sarah Paynter

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