MSc
2021 start

Money, Banking and Finance

Department of Economics, Faculty of Social Sciences

Explore specialist modules in finance, banking and monetary economics alongside economic theory.
MSc Economics and Public Policy postgraduate Mwanda Phiri at computer with colleague

Course description

You'll take specialist modules in finance, banking and monetary economics as well as learning core economic theory. This course equips you well for a career in banking, financial institutions and markets.

Applying for this course

Applications for this course are open from 21 June to 2 August 2021. Previous application dates: 14 September to 14 November 2020.

Modules

Core modules:

Macroeconomic Analysis

Macroeconomics concerns the behaviour of the economy as a whole. In this module you will develop a coherent framework for understanding macroeconomics building on microeconomic foundations. The module will analyse the source of business cycle fluctuations, the aims of monetary policy in advanced economies, including the design of optimal monetary policy. It will also provide an advanced understanding of fiscal policy and debt dynamics. You will be introduced to the concept of financial frictions in the context of the last financial crisis, and gain an understanding of the aims and challenges faced by monetary policy makers.

15 credits
Econometric Methods

This module will develop your core econometrics skills. The first half of the module provides a grounding in key econometric techniques covering elements such as the classical linear regression model, hypothesis testing and problems of non-spherical disturbances. More advanced topics are then introduced in the second half of the module. Specifically you will focus upon topics in microeconometrics: including modelling discrete binary variables; censoring and sample selection, and then topics in macroeconometrics including: economic forecasting; stationarity; and cointegration. You will also develop a knowledge of using econometric software Stata.

15 credits
Modern Theory of Banking and Finance

This module will give you a broad introduction into the economic literature on finance and banking. You will develop an understanding of the principles behind investment-financing decisions, the concept of governance and its implications for the efficiency of firms’ investment decisions, and the role of financial intermediation. The module emphasises both theoretical and practical considerations. On completing this module, you will have a working knowledge of lexicon, theory, and tools associated with monetary theory and understand how the economy and financial markets fit together.

15 credits
Modern Finance

This module will introduce you to some of the key concepts and methods in modern finance. This is an analytical module, which reflects the quantitative nature of the subject and in which each topic is developed from first principles. The module will cover the theoretical foundations of investor choice and portfolio selection based on utility theory, using these to provide a rigorous foundation for the Capital Asset Pricing Model. You will then examine some of the empirical issues that arise in the practical use of the theory.

15 credits

The content of our courses is reviewed annually to make sure it's up-to-date and relevant. Individual modules are occasionally updated or withdrawn. This is in response to discoveries through our world-leading research; funding changes; professional accreditation requirements; student or employer feedback; outcomes of reviews; and variations in staff or student numbers. In the event of any change we'll consult and inform students in good time and take reasonable steps to minimise disruption. We are no longer offering unrestricted module choice. If your course included unrestricted modules, your department will provide a list of modules from their own and other subject areas that you can choose from.

Duration

  • 1 year full-time
  • 2 years part-time

Entry requirements

2:1 undergraduate degree in economics.

We will also consider students with very good degrees in related subjects with a strong background in macroeconomics, microeconomics, mathematics and statistics.

Overall IELTS score of 6.5 with a minimum of 6.0 in each component, or equivalent.

We also accept a range of other UK qualifications and other EU/international qualifications.

If you have any questions about entry requirements, please contact the department.

Apply

Applications for this course are open from 1 March 2021 to 21 June 2021. Previous application dates: 14 September 2020 to 14 November 2020. You'll still apply for this course in the usual way, using our Postgraduate Online Application Form.

Apply now

Contact

economics-admissions@sheffield.ac.uk
+44 114 222 3456

Any supervisors and research areas listed are indicative and may change before the start of the course.

Recognition of professional qualifications: from 1 January 2021, in order to have any UK professional qualifications recognised for work in an EU country across a number of regulated and other professions you need to apply to the host country for recognition. Read information from the UK government and the EU Regulated Professions Database.

Explore this course:

    Dr Mark Bryan, Department of Economics

    Dr Mark Bryan

    Dr Mark Bryan is an expert in labour economics, micro-econometrics and wellbeing. He has advised the UK government on issues such as the minimum wage and the impact of the recession. He is a co-investigator on a Health Foundation project on the social and economic value of health.

    Mark teaches on the module Public Policy Evaluation which explores techniques to find out the direct causal effect of a given government policy, identifying the difference between what actually happened and what would have happened without the policy.

    ECNT31 Off