Archaeology students at a dig site.

Archaeology and History BA

Department of Archaeology

Department of History

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You are viewing this course for 2021-2022 entry.

Key details

Course description

History students discussing different artefacts in a seminar.

This course combines the study of historical texts with the investigation of past societies through the material record. Studying in two departments will enhance your understanding of both subjects, and how they inform each other.

At level one, you'll study archaeological and historical evidence and its relevance to the study of late prehistory and history.

Levels two and three allow you to develop your understanding and specialise in the aspects of archaeology and history that interest you most.

Dual and combined honours degrees

Modules

The modules listed below are examples from the last academic year. There may be some changes before you start your course. For the very latest module information, check with the department directly.

Choose a year to see modules for a level of study:

Title: Archaeology and History course structure
UCAS code: FV41
Years: 2021

For history, the first year programme is designed to help you to make the transition from studying History at school or college to studying it at degree level. It introduces you to core academic skills and provides a solid grounding in historical study and research, giving you the foundations you'll need to deepen your understanding of historical events and processes throughout your degree and setting you off on the path to becoming an independent historian.

Our first year history option modules introduce you to our main areas of teaching and research and give you insight into what you can study in the coming years, so that you can better shape your degree to your individual interests.

For archaeology , the first year gives you a global perspective on human origins and world civilisations. You'll be introduced to archaeological research process and our field school will give you a solid foundation in the methods of archaeological excavation.

History core module:

History Workshop

What does it take to be a historian? In this module, students study the process of historical research, learning discipline-specific methods and essential study and writing skills through close engagement with a historical monograph linked to their tutor¿s research interests. Students will develop skills in critical reading, historiography, essay writing, bibliographic techniques, and oral communication. Assessment consists of independent work (completing tasks on the online learning environment and producing a critical analysis of the secondary source), and group work (oral presentation on a related historical topic).

20 credits

History optional modules:

Empire: From the Ancient World to the Middle Ages

Covering the period from the 4th century BC to the 15th century AD, this module invites students to explore the ancient and medieval worlds through the lens of `empire'. It provides an introduction to ancient and medieval types of empire, their contacts with and legacies to each other, and the connectedness between East and West in this period. Using a wealth of primary evidence and drawing on corresponding historiographical debates, students explore what it meant to live in ancient and medieval empires, what kind of social, cultural and religious encounters they engendered, and whether there was any space for resistance.

20 credits
The 'Disenchantment' of Early Modern Europe, c. 1570-1770

The decline of magic, and some sorts of religion, lies at the heart of this course which traces the emergence of human societies that sought to operate according to rules supposed to be scientific. European cultural experience in the critical juncture between the Reformation and the Enlightenment was by no means the simple rejection of one world-view and its replacement with another. Through the rich, surviving evidence of court records and printing-presses we examine people's changing assumptions about how they should be governed and how they fitted into the world around them.

20 credits
The Making of the Twentieth Century

The module aims to explore the forces in Europe which produced two World Wars of unprecedented destruction, leaving the Continent in ruins by 1945. From there, it analyses the ways in which Europe was able to rise from the ashes, with a troubled route to a semblance of emerging unity - and certainly a half-century of initially unexpected peace - following the suicidal 'European Civil War' of 1914 - 1945. The changing balance of power and approach to war in 1914; the 'era of ideology' in the unparalleled brutality of 'totalitarian dictatorships' and the clashes of Fascism, Communism and Democracy; the postwar settlements; and the growth of the European Community are some of the themes explored.

20 credits
Land of Liberty? Rights in the USA, 1776-2016

In 1776, the Declaration of Independence proclaimed that men were created with ‘certain unalienable rights’. Yet the new United States denied those rights to large swathes of its people. Examining themes which resonate powerfully today, this module explores American history as a struggle over how rights have been defined and debated, expanded and contracted, and secured and denied. Linking the history of ideas to the efforts of ordinary people, we will look at debates over liberty and slavery, democracy and disenfranchisement, capital and labour, integration and segregation, gender and sexuality, nationalism and internationalism, and conservatism and liberalism.

20 credits
The Transformation of the United Kingdom, 1800 to the Present

This module explores the central political, social, economic, cultural and diplomatic developments that have transformed Britain since 1800. Unlike most of its European neighbours, Britain did not experience dramatic moments of revolution, constitution-building, invasion or military defeat; indeed the belief that the nation was set on a course of gradual evolutionary progress was central to many versions of British identity. This course examines how, when and why change occurred in Britain. Key themes include the transition to mass democracy; the impact of industrialisation; shifts in social relationships based on class, gender and ethnicity; and the rise and fall of Britain as an imperial power.

20 credits

Archaeology core modules:

Towards modernity: anthropology, archaeology & colonialism

This module explores how anthropoloogy and archaeology developed in early modern Europe, and how this development was shaped by, and mirrored, the cultural and political history of Europe, through the Renaissance, Reformation and especially European colonial expansion into other continents. Anthropology and archaeology developed to explore European encounters with the 'other' cultures of distant places and times. These disciplines have widely served to legitimise European exploitation of other continents and to promote particular groups and causes within Europe, but latterly have also critiqued such trends.

20 credits
Classical World and Its Legacy

Greco-Roman classical civilisation (particularly the 'high culture' of art, architecture, literature and political institutions) has long been seen as the inspiration for, and yardstick against which to judge, modern European culture. The rich and varied evidence of modern archaeology is used to explore how this high culture was supported and experienced by ordinary people. The module will consider the nature of Early Iron Age Greece and its Bronze Age background, the nature of its colonies in the Mediterranean, and the development of the Athenian Empire. The exploration of Italy will begin with the Iron Age peoples of the Italian peninsula, following on to trace the rise of Rome and her empire in the East and the West. The late Roman Empire will be examined with reference to the rise of Christianity and other eastern religions, and this will be traced through to the Early Medieval Period in Europe. The role of Islam in the formation of Europe, and the dissemination of Islamic culture, will be considered. The module will conclude by exploring the place of the Classical world in both modern Europe and the New World.

20 credits


The content of our courses is reviewed annually to make sure it's up-to-date and relevant. Individual modules are occasionally updated or withdrawn. This is in response to discoveries through our world-leading research; funding changes; professional accreditation requirements; student or employer feedback; outcomes of reviews; and variations in staff or student numbers. In the event of any change we'll consult and inform students in good time and take reasonable steps to minimise disruption.

Learning and assessment

Learning

Your degree combines hands-on learning with small-group teaching and lectures. You'll work in both the field and the laboratory, with practical experience (including fieldwork) forming an integral part of this course.

On the history side of your degree, you'll learn through a mix of lectures and discussion-based seminars, studying modules that are directly informed by the latest research of our internationally renowned tutors.

We invest to create the right environment for you. That means outstanding facilities, study spaces and support, including 24/7 online access to our online library service.

Study spaces and computers are available to offer you choice and flexibility for your study. Our five library sites give you access to over 1.3 million books and periodicals. You can access your library account and our rich digital collections from anywhere on or off campus. Other library services include study skills training to improve your grades, and tailored advice from experts in your subject.

Learning support facilities and library opening hours

You'll be taught by world leading experts in both departments. In the Department of Archaeology, our staff are engaged in cutting-edge research that puts them at the forefront of the discipline. They're also passionate, dedicated teachers who work tirelessly to ensure their students are inspired.

In the Department of History, our internationally renowned tutors offer modules spanning four thousand years and criss-crossing continents, allowing you to explore great events, extraordinary documents and remarkable people.

Entry requirements

With Access Sheffield, you could qualify for additional consideration or an alternative offer - find out if you're eligible

Standard offer
Access Sheffield offer

The A Level entry requirements for this course are:
ABB
typically including History or Classical Civilisation

The A Level entry requirements for this course are:
BBB
typically including History or Classical Civilisation

A Levels + additional qualifications | BBB + B in a relevant EPQ BBB + B in a relevant EPQ

International Baccalaureate | 33, typically with 5 in HL History 32, typically with 5 in Higher Level History

BTEC | DDM in a relevant subject + B in A Level History or Classical Civilisation DDM in a relevant subject + B in A Level History or Classical Civilisation

Scottish Highers + 1 Advanced Higher | AABBB + B, typically including History ABBBB + B typically in History or Classical Civilisation

Welsh Baccalaureate + 2 A Levels | B + AB B + BB, typically including History or Classical Civilisation

Access to HE Diploma | 60 credits overall with 45 at Level 3, including 30 credits at Distinction, typically to include some History credits, and 15 credits at Merit 60 credits overall with 45 at Level 3, including 24 credits at Distinction, typically to include some History credits, and 21 credits at Merit

Mature students - explore other routes for mature students

English language requirements

You must demonstrate that your English is good enough for you to successfully complete your course. For this course we require: GCSE English Language at grade 4/C; IELTS grade of 6.5 with a minimum of 6.0 in each component; or an alternative acceptable English language qualification

Equivalent English language qualifications

Visa and immigration requirements

We also accept a range of other UK qualifications and other EU/international qualifications.

If you have any questions about entry requirements, please contact the department.

Department of Archaeology

An archaeology postgraduate student uses a microscope.

The Department of Archaeology at Sheffield has a reputation for world-leading research and teaching in archaeology. We're among the top 50 archaeology departments in the world (QS World University Rankings by Subject 2020).

You'll be taught by experts in their field who are at the forefront of their research. Our research-led teaching draws directly on the work of our inspirational academics who are experts in the specialist fields of bioarchaeology, medieval archaeology, cultural materials, funerary archaeology, Mediterranean archaeology and landscape archaeology.

We take an interdisciplinary approach to teaching, bringing science, the humanities and other related areas to your studies. Our multidisciplinary teaching helps you develop a strong set of skills. Our graduates are articulate, analytical and creative. They are also adaptable, curious and culturally aware. We have alumni working all over the world in a diverse range of fields, including archiving, archaeology, teaching, museums, charities, publishing, and national and local government.

Our staff and students play an important role in the life of the city through projects and partnerships with heritage groups, commercial archaeologists and heritage providers. You'll share your understanding with others, and by doing this you'll help local communities make sense of their origins, and get a sense of their place in the wider world.

The Department of Archaeology is based in the Ella Armitage Building, named after the influential Norman historian and archaeologist (1841-1931). The Ella Armitage Building is home to our cutting-edge labortiy facilities and is situated at the heart of the university campus, close to the Diamond and the Information Commons.

Facilities

Our cutting-edge laboratory facilities, purpose-built in 2017, house extensive bioarchaeological research collections and modern experimental equipment.

Department of Archaeology

Department of History

As a history student at Sheffield, you'll develop your understanding of the past in a friendly and supportive environment.

Our internationally-renowned tutors offer modules spanning four thousand years and criss-crossing continents - allowing you to explore great events, extraordinary documents, remarkable people, and long-lasting transformations, from the ancient period to the modern day and across the globe.

You can tailor your course to suit you, discovering the areas of history that most inspire you most while preparing for the future you want with opportunities like studying abroad, work placements and volunteering.

Department of History students are based in the Jessop West building at the heart of the university campus, close to the Diamond and the Information Commons. We share the Jessop West Building with the School of English and the School of Languages and Cultures.

Department of History

Why choose Sheffield?

The University of Sheffield

  A Top 100 university 2021
QS World University Rankings

  Top 10% of all UK universities
Research Excellence Framework 2014

  No 1 Students' Union in the UK
Whatuni Student Choice Awards 2019, 2018, 2017

  No 1 in the north for graduate employment
The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2020


Department of Archaeology

Top 10 in the UK for student satisfaction

National Student Survey 2020

29th in the world for the study of archaeology

QS World University Rankings by Subject 2020


Department of History

Top 5 in the UK for History

The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2020

3rd in the UK for world-leading research

Research Excellence Framework 2014


Graduate careers

Department of Archaeology

The archaeology workforce in the UK needs to grow by 25 per cent over the next five years and by 64 per cent by 2033 to meet the demands of infrastructure projects. Sheffield graduates are highly skilled and equipped to join this growing industry.

We talk to employers to make sure you develop the qualities they're looking for. Our close links with community heritage groups, commercial archaeologists and heritage providers give you direct access to research opportunities, work placement experience and valuable careers advice.

Your analytical, creative, communication and teamwork skills will open doors to a range of careers within and beyond archaeology.

Approximately 40 per cent of our graduates go on to work in archaeology or the heritage sector. Many graduates work in commercial units, national and local government, the charitable sector and university departments. Some choose to study for a postgraduate degree.

Others have gone into areas such as journalism, teaching, healthcare, law, accountancy and the media.

Department of History

Our history graduates are highly skilled in research, critical reasoning and communication. You'll be able to think and write coherently, to put specific matters in a broader context, and to summarise complex ideas in a discerning and creative way.

Our graduates have gone on to become successful lawyers, marketing executives, civil servants, accountants, management consultants, university lecturers, archivists, librarians and workers in museums, tourism and the heritage industry.

So, however you choose to use your degree, the combination of academic excellence and personal skills developed and demonstrated on your course will make you stand out in an increasingly competitive graduate world.

Companies that have employed our graduates include Accenture, Ernst and Young, PricewaterhouseCoopers and DLA Piper. You'll also find our graduates in organisations ranging from the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, to the Imperial War Museum and the National Archives, to BBC online and The Guardian.

Fees and funding

Fees

Additional costs

The annual fee for your course includes a number of items in addition to your tuition. If an item or activity is classed as a compulsory element for your course, it will normally be included in your tuition fee. There are also other costs which you may need to consider.

Examples of what’s included and excluded

Funding your study

Depending on your circumstances, you may qualify for a bursary, scholarship or loan to help fund your study and enhance your learning experience.

Use our Student Funding Calculator to work out what you're eligible for.

Visit us

University open days

There are four open days every year, usually in June, July, September and October. You can talk to staff and students, tour the campus and see inside the accommodation.

Open days: book your place

Taster days

At various times in the year we run online taster sessions to help Year 12 students experience what it is like to study at the University of Sheffield.

Upcoming taster sessions

Applicant days

If you've received an offer to study with us, we'll invite you to one of our applicant days, which take place between November and April. These applicant days have a strong department focus and give you the chance to really explore student life here, even if you've visited us before.

Campus tours

Campus tours run regularly throughout the year, at 1pm every Monday, Wednesday and Friday.

Book your place on a campus tour

Apply for this course

Make sure you've done everything you need to do before you apply.

How to apply When you're ready to apply, see the UCAS website:
www.ucas.com

The awarding body for this course is the University of Sheffield.

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Terms and Conditions upon Acceptance of an Offer

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    2021-2022