A crowded street in Tokyo at night

Japanese Studies and History BA

School of East Asian Studies

Department of History

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You are viewing this course for 2021-2022 entry.

Key details

Course description

A lecturer showing students a card with two Chinese characters on

Complex, unique, endlessly fascinating, Japan embraces modernity and technology while maintaining its rich traditional culture. To truly understand Japan, you have to experience it. You have to immerse yourself in it.

We teach Japanese intensively, from scratch. You will study the phonetic scripts (kana) from the outset, picking up the 2000 Sino-Japanese characters (kanji) over the course of your degree.

The history side of your course covers past societies from the Roman to the Modern period. Outside the seminar room, you'll work on projects that bring history to life, like our student-run New Histories blog and WikiAmerica.

You will spend your third year studying at one of our partner universities in Japan. More than just a chance to put what you've learned into practice, this year is an experience you won't forget.

Energised and inspired, you'll return to Sheffield for your final year. The language training continues, now at a more advanced level. Supervised by an academic, you'll research and write a dissertation on a topic of your choice.

Dual and combined honours degrees

Modules

The modules listed below are examples from the last academic year. There may be some changes before you start your course. For the very latest module information, check with the department directly.

Choose a year to see modules for a level of study:

Title: Japanese Studies and History BA course structure
UCAS code: TV21
Years: 2021

For history, the first year programme is designed to help you to make the transition from studying History at school or college to studying it at degree level. It introduces you to core academic skills and provides a solid grounding in historical study and research, giving you the foundations you'll need to deepen your understanding of historical events and processes throughout your degree and setting you off on the path to becoming an independent historian.

Our first year history option modules introduce you to our main areas of teaching and research and give you insight into what you can study in the coming years, so that you can better shape your degree to your individual interests.

Core history module:

History Workshop

What does it take to be a historian? In this module, students study the process of historical research, learning discipline-specific methods and essential study and writing skills through close engagement with a historical monograph linked to their tutor¿s research interests. Students will develop skills in critical reading, historiography, essay writing, bibliographic techniques, and oral communication. Assessment consists of independent work (completing tasks on the online learning environment and producing a critical analysis of the secondary source), and group work (oral presentation on a related historical topic).

20 credits

History option modules:

Empire: From the Ancient World to the Middle Ages

Covering the period from the 4th century BC to the 15th century AD, this module invites students to explore the ancient and medieval worlds through the lens of `empire'. It provides an introduction to ancient and medieval types of empire, their contacts with and legacies to each other, and the connectedness between East and West in this period. Using a wealth of primary evidence and drawing on corresponding historiographical debates, students explore what it meant to live in ancient and medieval empires, what kind of social, cultural and religious encounters they engendered, and whether there was any space for resistance.

20 credits
The 'Disenchantment' of Early Modern Europe, c. 1570-1770

The decline of magic, and some sorts of religion, lies at the heart of this course which traces the emergence of human societies that sought to operate according to rules supposed to be scientific. European cultural experience in the critical juncture between the Reformation and the Enlightenment was by no means the simple rejection of one world-view and its replacement with another. Through the rich, surviving evidence of court records and printing-presses we examine people's changing assumptions about how they should be governed and how they fitted into the world around them.

20 credits
The Making of the Twentieth Century

The module aims to explore the forces in Europe which produced two World Wars of unprecedented destruction, leaving the Continent in ruins by 1945. From there, it analyses the ways in which Europe was able to rise from the ashes, with a troubled route to a semblance of emerging unity - and certainly a half-century of initially unexpected peace - following the suicidal 'European Civil War' of 1914 - 1945. The changing balance of power and approach to war in 1914; the 'era of ideology' in the unparalleled brutality of 'totalitarian dictatorships' and the clashes of Fascism, Communism and Democracy; the postwar settlements; and the growth of the European Community are some of the themes explored.

20 credits
Land of Liberty? Rights in the USA, 1776-2016

In 1776, the Declaration of Independence proclaimed that men were created with ‘certain unalienable rights’. Yet the new United States denied those rights to large swathes of its people. Examining themes which resonate powerfully today, this module explores American history as a struggle over how rights have been defined and debated, expanded and contracted, and secured and denied. Linking the history of ideas to the efforts of ordinary people, we will look at debates over liberty and slavery, democracy and disenfranchisement, capital and labour, integration and segregation, gender and sexuality, nationalism and internationalism, and conservatism and liberalism.

20 credits
The Transformation of the United Kingdom, 1800 to the Present

This module explores the central political, social, economic, cultural and diplomatic developments that have transformed Britain since 1800. Unlike most of its European neighbours, Britain did not experience dramatic moments of revolution, constitution-building, invasion or military defeat; indeed the belief that the nation was set on a course of gradual evolutionary progress was central to many versions of British identity. This course examines how, when and why change occurred in Britain. Key themes include the transition to mass democracy; the impact of industrialisation; shifts in social relationships based on class, gender and ethnicity; and the rise and fall of Britain as an imperial power.

20 credits

Core Japanese modules:

Japanese Language 1A

This module is focusing on receptive activities and written productive activities in Japanese language. It aims to enable students to acquire basic competence in grammar, reading, writing and translation both from and into Japanese. Every week carefully designed grammar structures and vocabulary will be introduced so that students will be able to do something practical in Japanese. Kanji (Chinese characters) as well as Japanese characters (hiragana and katakana) are introduced from the earliest stages.

20 credits
Japanese Language 2A

This module is focusing on receptive activities and written productive activities in Japanese language. This module builds on the achievement of Japanese Language 1A and introduces further grammatical structures of the Japanese language with a view to further developing reading, writing and translation skills. Every week carefully designed grammar structures and vocabulary will be introduced so that students will be able to do something practical in Japanese. At the end of this level students should complete the beginner¿s level which is roughly equivalent to JLPT (Japanese Language Proficiency Test) N4 or CEFR (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages) A2.

20 credits
Japanese Language 1B

This module is focusing on interactive activities in Japanese. It aims to enable students to acquire basic competence in speaking and listening skills. Every week carefully designed grammar structures and vocabulary will be introduced so that students will be able to communicate in Japanese through a variety of daily activities.

10 credits
Japanese Language 2B

This module is focusing on interactive activities in Japanese. This module is built on the achievement of EAS146 and develop speaking and listening skills further to provide the grounding necessary for intermediate study. Every week carefully designed grammar structures and vocabulary will be introduced so that students will be able to communicate in Japanese through a variety of activities. At the end of this level students should complete the beginner's level which is roughly equivalent to JLPT (Japanese Language Proficiency Test) N4 or CEFR (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages) A2.

10 credits


The content of our courses is reviewed annually to make sure it's up-to-date and relevant. Individual modules are occasionally updated or withdrawn. This is in response to discoveries through our world-leading research; funding changes; professional accreditation requirements; student or employer feedback; outcomes of reviews; and variations in staff or student numbers. In the event of any change we'll consult and inform students in good time and take reasonable steps to minimise disruption.

Learning and assessment

Learning

You will undertake intensive Japanese language training in small group classes with native speaking tutors and making use of specially designed learning materials.

On the history side of your course, you'll learn through a mix of lectures and discussion-based seminars, studying modules that are directly informed by the latest research of our internationally renowned tutors.

We invest to create the right environment for you. That means outstanding facilities, study spaces and support, including 24/7 online access to our online library service.

Study spaces and computers are available to offer you choice and flexibility for your study. Our five library sites give you access to over 1.3 million books and periodicals. You can access your library account and our rich digital collections from anywhere on or off campus. Other library services include study skills training to improve your grades, and tailored advice from experts in your subject.

Learning support facilities and library opening hours

The School of East Asian Studies has over 50 years’ experience of researching contemporary East Asia and pioneering new methods for teaching East Asian Languages.

SEAS staff, many of whom are fluent in at least one East Asian language, are internationally-renowned specialists in East Asia, and bring their expertise in various fields such as history, culture and politics, to the wide range of courses on offer at SEAS.

In the Department of History, our internationally renowned tutors offer modules spanning four thousand years and criss-crossing continents, allowing you to explore great events, extraordinary documents and remarkable people.

Assessment

In the language programme you will be given regular homework assignments and take exams at the end of each semester. You will be assessed on the core skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing.

Programme specification

This tells you the aims and learning outcomes of this course and how these will be achieved and assessed.

Find programme specification for this course

Entry requirements

With Access Sheffield, you could qualify for additional consideration or an alternative offer - find out if you're eligible

Standard offer
Access Sheffield offer

The A Level entry requirements for this course are:
ABB
ABB, typically including History or Classical Civilisation

The A Level entry requirements for this course are:
BBB
typically including History or Classical Civilisation

A Levels + additional qualifications | BBB, typically including History or Classical Civilisation + B in relevant EPQ BBB, typically including History or Classical Civilisation + B in relevant EPQ

International Baccalaureate | 33, typically with 5 in Higher Level History 32, typically with 5 in Higher Level History

BTEC | DDM in a relevant subject, typically in combination with B in A Level History DDM in a relevant subject, typically in combination with B in A Level History

Scottish Highers + 1 Advanced Higher | AABBB, typically + B in History ABBBB, typically + B in History

Welsh Baccalaureate + 2 A Levels | B + AB, typically including History B + AB, typically including History

Access to HE Diploma | 60 credits overall with Distinctions in 30 Level 3 credits and Merits in 15 Level 3 credits 60 credits overall with Distinctions in 24 Level 3 credits including History units and Merits in 21 Level 3 credits

Mature students - explore other routes for mature students

English language requirements

You must demonstrate that your English is good enough for you to successfully complete your course. For this course we require: GCSE English Language at grade 4/C; IELTS grade of 7.0 with a minimum of 6.5 in each component; or an alternative acceptable English language qualification

Equivalent English language qualifications

Visa and immigration requirements

Other requirements
  • No prior knowledge of Japanese required (up to A Level Japanese acceptable)

We also accept a range of other UK qualifications and other EU/international qualifications.

If you have any questions about entry requirements, please contact the department.

School of East Asian Studies

Our courses are designed to immerse you in the languages and cultures of East Asian countries. You will be taught by native speakers in Chinese, Japanese and Korean in regular small group classes using custom made course material. To enhance your learning, we also have a modern virtual language lab, which enables you to learn using visual and audio aids.

Our courses are based on world-leading research and taught by experts whose work influences policy and informs public debate. Most of our staff publish in their specialist field and many of them have written books for major publishers such as Oxford University Press, Routledge and Macmillan.

Take one of our Chinese, Japanese or Korean studies degrees and spend a year studying at a leading university in your chosen country. Our partners are Nanjing University in China, six high ranking universities in South Korea including Yonsei University in Seoul and more than 25 Japanese universities including Tokyo, Kyoto and Waseda University.

As part of this degree you'll spend a year studying in Japan at one of our partner institutions located across the breadth of the country, from Hokkaido in the snowy north to Okinawa in the tropical south. There are over twenty possible destinations, including elite public and private universities, as well as prominent regional institutions.

Facilities

To enhance your learning, the School of East Asian Studies has a modern virtual language lab, which enables you to learn using visual and audio aids.

School of East Asian Studies

Department of History

As a history student at Sheffield, you'll develop your understanding of the past in a friendly and supportive environment.

Our internationally-renowned tutors offer modules spanning four thousand years and criss-crossing continents - allowing you to explore great events, extraordinary documents, remarkable people, and long-lasting transformations, from the ancient period to the modern day and across the globe.

You can tailor your course to suit you, discovering the areas of history that most inspire you most while preparing for the future you want with opportunities like studying abroad, work placements and volunteering.

Department of History students are based in the Jessop West building at the heart of the university campus, close to the Diamond and the Information Commons. We share the Jessop West Building with the School of English and the School of Languages and Cultures.

Department of History

Why choose Sheffield?

The University of Sheffield

  A Top 100 university 2021
QS World University Rankings

  Top 10% of all UK universities
Research Excellence Framework 2014

  No 1 Students' Union in the UK
Whatuni Student Choice Awards 2019, 2018, 2017

  No 1 in the north for graduate employment
The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2020


School of East Asian Studies

1st for overall student satisfaction in the Russell Group for East Asian Studies

National Student Survey 2020


Department of History

Top 5 in the UK for History

The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2020

3rd in the UK for world-leading research

Research Excellence Framework 2014


Graduate careers

School of East Asian Studies

Studying China, Japan or Korea prepares you for a career in the world's most dynamic region. There are also many opportunities across Europe for people with skills in Asian languages and cultures.

Our graduates work in government and diplomacy, media and the arts, non-government organisations and international business - in professions as diverse as management consultancy, accountancy, marketing, research, language teaching and translation.

Department of History

Our history graduates are highly skilled in research, critical reasoning and communication. You'll be able to think and write coherently, to put specific matters in a broader context, and to summarise complex ideas in a discerning and creative way.

Our graduates have gone on to become successful lawyers, marketing executives, civil servants, accountants, management consultants, university lecturers, archivists, librarians and workers in museums, tourism and the heritage industry.

So, however you choose to use your degree, the combination of academic excellence and personal skills developed and demonstrated on your course will make you stand out in an increasingly competitive graduate world.

Companies that have employed our graduates include Accenture, Ernst and Young, PricewaterhouseCoopers and DLA Piper. You'll also find our graduates in organisations ranging from the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, to the Imperial War Museum and the National Archives, to BBC online and The Guardian.

The crest of the University of Sheffield - image

I get to work with some amazing talent and do what I love all day every day

Kelly Harlock Japanese Studies BA(Hons) graduate

Now working producing audio entertainment for Virgin Atlantic and for Classic FM at the weekend, Kelly talks about how the good work ethic Sheffield fostered in her has equipped her with the tools to get herself to where she is today.

Year abroad

As part of this degree you'll spend a year studying in Japan at one of our partner institutions located across the breadth of the country, from Hokkaido in the snowy north to Okinawa in the tropical south. There are over twenty possible destinations, including elite public and private universities, as well as prominent regional institutions.

During your year in Japan you'll immerse yourself in this fascinating country. You'll continue to take intensive Japanese language courses as well as choosing from a range of other modules taught in English or Japanese.

Fees and funding

Fees

Additional costs

The annual fee for your course includes a number of items in addition to your tuition. If an item or activity is classed as a compulsory element for your course, it will normally be included in your tuition fee. There are also other costs which you may need to consider.

Examples of what’s included and excluded

Funding your study

Depending on your circumstances, you may qualify for a bursary, scholarship or loan to help fund your study and enhance your learning experience.

Use our Student Funding Calculator to work out what you're eligible for.

Visit us

University open days

There are four open days every year, usually in June, July, September and October. You can talk to staff and students, tour the campus and see inside the accommodation.

Open days: book your place

Taster days

At various times in the year we run online taster sessions to help Year 12 students experience what it is like to study at the University of Sheffield.

Upcoming taster sessions

Applicant days

If you've received an offer to study with us, we'll invite you to one of our applicant days, which take place between November and April. These applicant days have a strong department focus and give you the chance to really explore student life here, even if you've visited us before.

Campus tours

Campus tours run regularly throughout the year, at 1pm every Monday, Wednesday and Friday.

Book your place on a campus tour

Apply for this course

Make sure you've done everything you need to do before you apply.

How to apply When you're ready to apply, see the UCAS website:
www.ucas.com

The awarding body for this course is the University of Sheffield.

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Terms and Conditions upon Acceptance of an Offer

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    2021-2022