Dr Emma Gregory, BA, MMedSci, PhD, MRCSLT, SFHEA

Emma Gregory

Department of Human Communication Sciences
University of Sheffield
362 Mushroom Lane
Sheffield
S10 2TS
United Kingdom

Tel: +44 (0) 114 22 22417
Fax: +44 (0) 114 222 2439

email : emma.gregory@sheffield.ac.uk

Biography

In July 2015 I commenced my current role of Lecturer and Course Director for the MMedSci in Clinical Communication Studies. Prior to this I was a University Teacher within the department. My areas of teaching include Motor Speech Disorders, Voice, Dysphagia, Aphasia and Clinical Methods.

I completed a PhD in 2012 which was funded by a Stroke Association Allied Health Professional Research Bursary. My research explored the activation of syntactic information in spoken word production in healthy speakers and the effect of syntactic cues on immediate and long-term word retrieval in aphasia. I have also been involved in research developing accessible information for people with aphasia.

I qualified as a Speech and Language Therapist in 2004. Prior to joining the department in 2007, I worked as a clinician with adults with acquired neurological communication and swallowing disorders in Mansfield PCT and Sheffield PCT. I hold an honorary contract with Sheffield Children’s Hospital NHS Trust. I am a member of the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapist and the Health Professions Council.

Research interests

  • Acquired aphasia
  • Models of spoken word production
  • The activation of syntactic information in spoken word production
  • Therapy for word finding in aphasia
  • Making information for people with aphasia accessible

Collaborators

Dr. Ruth Herbert, Prof. Rosemary Varley and Caroline Haw

Publications

Herbert, R., Anderson, E., Best, W., & Gregory, E. (2014). Activation of syntax in lexical production in healthy speakers and in aphasia. Cortex, 57, 212-226.
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0010945214001208

Herbert, R., Gregory, E., Best, W. (2014). Syntactic versus lexical therapy for anomia in acquired aphasia: Differential effects on narrative and conversation. International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 49, 2, 162-173.

Herbert, R., Haw, C., Brown, C,. Gregory, E., Brumfitt, S. (2012). Accessible Information Guidelines. Stroke Association, May 2012. ISBN 978-0-901548-66-5.

Gregory, E., Varley, R. & Herbert, R. (2012). Determiner Primes as Facilitators of Lexical Retrieval in English. Journal of Psycholinguistic Research, (in press).

Gregory, E., Varley, R., Herbert, R. (2010). Integration of Syntax and Lexis in Anomia Therapy. Procedia Social and Behavioural Sciences, 6, 258-259.