Students in the University of Sheffield's Quantum Information Laboratory

Physics and Astrophysics with a Year in Industry BSc

Department of Physics and Astronomy

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You are viewing this course for 2021-22 entry. 2022-23 entry is also available.

Key details

Course description

Students visiting the telescope facilities on La Palma
University of Sheffield astrophysics students can visit the telescope facilities on La Palma in the Canary Islands.

The year in industry is a one-year extension of the BSc Physics and Astrophysics with a Year in Industry degree. A year in industry will put your academic studies into context, and improve your skills and your employability.

This is a broad and intellectually stimulating degree that includes core physics knowledge and a thorough grounding in astrophysics. You'll study the workings of the universe, from the planets of our solar system to the most distant galaxies.

You'll learn how to analyse astronomical data, draw conclusions and present results. You can spend time in the astronomy laboratory and use our robotic telescope to take your own data. There are two projects to complete in your final year.

If you want to study physics, but don't meet the entry requirements to go straight into the first year, our Physics with a Foundation Year could be for you. After successfully completing the one-year programme, you'll progress onto the first year of your chosen degree.

Accredited by the Institute of Physics (IOP) for the purpose of fully meeting the educational requirement for Chartered Physicist.

Modules

The modules listed below are examples from the last academic year. There may be some changes before you start your course. For the very latest module information, check with the department directly.

Choose a year to see modules for a level of study:

Title: Physics and Astrophysics with a Year in Industry BSc course structure
UCAS code: FF36
Years: 2021

Core modules:

Mathematics for Physicists and Astronomers

This module provides the necessary level 1 mathematics for students taking physics and/or astronomy degrees. The following topics will be covered: basic algebra (functions, coordinate systems, algebraic manipulation etc), Taylor and binomial series, common functions of one variable, differentiation and integration techniques, basic complex numbers, first and second order differential equations, vector calculus, properties and applications of matrices and elementary probability theory.

30 credits
Fields and Quanta

This module introduces the key concepts of fields and quanta: electric and magnetic fields, the behaviour of electric charges and currents, vectors and densities, potentials, quantum states and their evolution, the probabilistic nature of fundamental physical law, and the breakdown of classical physics. This module will teach you how physics problems relate to these fundamental concepts, and how those concepts are used to construct solutions.

25 credits
Motion and Heat

This module introduces and applies the key concepts of motion and heat: force, equations of motion, phase space, determinism and free will, symmetry and conservation laws, waves and oscillations, coherence and classical frequency-time uncertainty, the laws of thermodynamics, thermal equilibrium, entropy and the arrow of time. You will learn how physics problems relate to these fundamental concepts, and how those concepts are used to construct solutions. You will apply the key concepts to design experiments to test scientific hypotheses. You will develop your data analysis and communication skills and to use different sources of information in your learning. You will work independently and as part of a group, developing a wide variety of study skills that will prepare you for the rest of your degree programme.

25 credits
Introduction to Astrophysics

One of four half-modules forming the Level-1 Astronomy course, PHY104 aims to equip students with a basic understanding of the important physical concepts and techniques involved in astronomy with an emphasis on how fundamental results can be derived from fairly simple observations. The module consists of three sections:

(i) Basic Concepts, Fluxes, Temperatures and Magnitudes;

(ii) Astronomical Spectroscopy;

(iii) Gravitational Astrophysics.

Parts (i), (ii) and (iii) each comprise some six lectures. The lectures are supported by problems classes, in which you will learn to apply lecture material to the solution of numerical problems.

10 credits
Observing the Night Sky

This module aims to equip the student with a grounding in the observational and computational data analysis skills they will need as part of an astronomy degree programme, and is an essential pre-requisite of the more advanced handling of astrophysical data that will be expected as part of Levels 2, 3 and 4. The module consists of a mixture of taught material, workshops, and practical activities in positional astronomy, telescope optics, practical observing skills, basic python programming, and astrophysical data analysis.

10 credits
Our Evolving Universe

The course provides a general overview of astronomy suitable for those with no previous experience of the subject. The principal topics covered are (1) how we deduce useful physical parameters from observed quantities, (2) the structure and evolution of stars, (3) the structure of the Milky Way, and the classification, structure and evolution of galaxies in general, (4) an introduction to cosmology and (5) extrasolar plantets and an introduction to astrobiology. All topics are treated in a descriptive manner with minimal mathematics.

10 credits
The Solar System

One of the four half-modules forming the Level 1 astronomy course, but may also be taken as a stand-alone module. PHY106 covers the elements of the Solar System: the Sun, planets, moons and minor bodies. What are their structures and compositions, and what dothey tell us about the formation and history of the Solar System?

10 credits

The content of our courses is reviewed annually to make sure it's up-to-date and relevant. Individual modules are occasionally updated or withdrawn. This is in response to discoveries through our world-leading research; funding changes; professional accreditation requirements; student or employer feedback; outcomes of reviews; and variations in staff or student numbers. In the event of any change we'll consult and inform students in good time and take reasonable steps to minimise disruption. We are no longer offering unrestricted module choice. If your course included unrestricted modules, your department will provide a list of modules from their own and other subject areas that you can choose from.

Learning and assessment

Learning

You'll learn through lectures, small group tutorials, programming classes, practical sessions in the lab and research projects.

We invest to create the right environment for you. That means outstanding facilities, study spaces and support, including 24/7 online access to our online library service.

Study spaces and computers are available to offer you choice and flexibility for your study. Our five library sites give you access to over 1.3 million books and periodicals. You can access your library account and our rich digital collections from anywhere on or off campus. Other library services include study skills training to improve your grades, and tailored advice from experts in your subject.

Learning support facilities and library opening hours

Programme specification

This tells you the aims and learning outcomes of this course and how these will be achieved and assessed.

Find programme specification for this course

Entry requirements

With Access Sheffield, you could qualify for additional consideration or an alternative offer - find out if you're eligible

Standard offer
Access Sheffield offer

The A Level entry requirements for this course are:
AAB
including Maths and Physics

The A Level entry requirements for this course are:
ABB
including Maths and Physics

A Levels + additional qualifications | ABB, including Maths and Physics + B in a relevant EPQ ABB, including Maths and Physics + B in a relevant EPQ

International Baccalaureate | 34, 6, 5 in Higher Level Maths and Physics 33 with 5 in Higher Level Maths and Physics

BTEC | Not accepted Not accepted

Scottish Highers + 2 Advanced Highers | AAABB + AB in Maths and Physics AABBB + AB in Maths and Physics

Welsh Baccalaureate + 2 A Levels | B + AA in Maths and Physics B + AB in Maths and Physics

Access to HE Diploma | 60 credits overall in Science with Distinctions in 36 Level 3 credits (all in Mathematics and Physics), and Merits in 9 level 3 credits 60 credits overall in Science with Distinctions in 30 Level 3 credits (all in Mathematics and Physics), and Merits in 15 level 3 credits

Mature students - explore other routes for mature students

English language requirements

You must demonstrate that your English is good enough for you to successfully complete your course. For this course we require: GCSE English Language at grade 4/C; IELTS grade of 6.5 with a minimum of 6.0 in each component; or an alternative acceptable English language qualification

Equivalent English language qualifications

Visa and immigration requirements

Other requirements
  • Students must have passed the practical element of any science A Level taken

We also accept a range of other UK qualifications and other EU/international qualifications.

If you have any questions about entry requirements, please contact the department.

Department of Physics and Astronomy

2D materials laboratory

Scientists in the Department of Physics and Astronomy are working on topics such as how to build a quantum computer, the search for dark matter and ways to combat antimicrobial resistance. They run experiments on the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and help to map the universe using the Hubble Space Telescope. They’ll guide you through the key topics in physics and give you a huge range of optional modules to choose from. 

The department is based in the Hicks Building, which has recently refurbished undergraduate teaching laboratories with all the equipment you need for your physics and astronomy training, as well as classrooms, lecture theatres, computer rooms and social spaces for our students.

There are also telescopes and a solar technology testbed on the roof, state-of-the-art laboratories for building super-resolution microscopes and analysing 2D materials, and the UK’s first Quantum Information Laboratory, where students can study the fundamental science behind the next technological revolution. It’s right next door to the Students' Union, and just down the road from the 24/7 library facilities at the Information Commons and the Diamond.

Facilities

Our students are trained in newly refurbished teaching laboratories and can access a range of specialist technologies, from the telescopes on our roof to our state-of-the-art Quantum Information Laboratory.

In their final year, MPhys students are based in a specialist research laboratory where scientists are studying technologies such as 2D materials, photovoltaic devices and advanced microscopy tools.

Department of Physics and Astronomy

Why choose Sheffield?

The University of Sheffield

  A Top 100 university 2021
QS World University Rankings

  Top 10% of all UK universities
Research Excellence Framework 2014

  No 1 Students' Union in the UK
Whatuni Student Choice Awards 2019, 2018, 2017


Department of Physics and Astronomy

Top ten in the UK for research output

Research Excellence Framework 2014


Physics and Astrophysics with a Year in Industry

UK top 10 for overall satisfaction in Astronomy

National Student Survey 2020

100% of placement year graduates in graduate level work or further study

Graduate Outcomes 2020

Graduate careers

Department of Physics and Astronomy

Our physics students develop numerical, problem solving and data analysis skills that are useful in many graduate jobs, including computer programming, software engineering, data science, and research and development into new products and services. Their expertise can be applied to many of the challenges and opportunities of the 21st century, from developing renewable energy technologies and improving medical treatments to creating quantum telecommunications systems and exploring outer space.

Students who want to work as a physics researcher often do a PhD, which can lead to a career at a top university or a major international research facility such as CERN.

The University of Sheffield is part of the White Rose Industrial Physics Academy. This partnership of university physics departments and technical industries can set up collaborations between our students and industrial partners through internships, year in industry placements, final year projects and careers activities. WRIPA also organises the UK’s largest physics recruitment fair, where our students can meet potential employers.

Ciaran Allen

My degree fostered my interest in data, which I use every week in my job

Ciaran Allen BSc Physics and Astrophysics

Ciaran went into the medical implant and instrument manufacturing industry after graduation, to build on the interest in data he developed during his degree.

Fees and funding

Fees

Additional costs

The annual fee for your course includes a number of items in addition to your tuition. If an item or activity is classed as a compulsory element for your course, it will normally be included in your tuition fee. There are also other costs which you may need to consider.

Examples of what’s included and excluded

Funding your study

Depending on your circumstances, you may qualify for a bursary, scholarship or loan to help fund your study and enhance your learning experience.

Use our Student Funding Calculator to work out what you’re eligible for.

Additional funding

Department of Physics and Astronomy scholarships

Visit us

University open days

There are four open days every year, usually in June, July, September and October. You can talk to staff and students, tour the campus and see inside the accommodation.

Open days: book your place

Taster days

At various times in the year we run online taster sessions to help Year 12 students experience what it is like to study at the University of Sheffield.

Upcoming taster sessions

Applicant days

If you've received an offer to study with us, we'll invite you to one of our applicant days, which take place between November and April. These applicant days have a strong department focus and give you the chance to really explore student life here, even if you've visited us before.

Campus tours

Campus tours run regularly throughout the year, at 1pm every Monday, Wednesday and Friday.

Book your place on a campus tour

Apply for this course

Make sure you've done everything you need to do before you apply.

How to apply When you're ready to apply, see the UCAS website:
www.ucas.com

The awarding body for this course is the University of Sheffield.

Recognition of professional qualifications: from 1 January 2021, in order to have any UK professional qualifications recognised for work in an EU country across a number of regulated and other professions you need to apply to the host country for recognition. Read information from the UK government and the EU Regulated Professions Database.

Our student protection plan

Terms and Conditions upon Acceptance of an Offer

Explore this course:

    2021-2022