Three bioengineering students working around a microscope and taking notes

Bioengineering BEng

Bioengineering

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You are viewing this course for 2022-23 entry. 2021-22 entry is also available.

Key details

Course description

Be inspired to help shape the future of healthcare technology on this flexible course. In your first year you'll get a broad-based introduction to bioengineering.

You'll learn about biology, physiology and anatomy, and begin to understand how traditional engineering principles can be applied to the human body.

At the end of year one, you'll choose between two broad themes before refining your choice even further in year two to study one of these four specialisms for the rest of the course:

  • Biomedical Engineering - How engineering principles can provide innovative solutions to safeguard and enhance human health.
  • Medical Devices and Systems - The development of novel medical devices and the improvement of clinical engineering systems.
  • Biomaterials Science and Tissue Engineering - The application of materials engineering and cell biology principles to achieve improved repair of injured and damaged body tissues and organs.
  • Biomanufacturing - The application of chemical engineering and cell biology principles to improve the manufacture of pharmaceuticals and other biologically active substances.

In the third year you'll complete an individual project on a topic related to your chosen specialism.

All our students take the Global Engineering Challenge. Working with students from other engineering courses you'll have to find creative solutions to problems.

The project looks at challenges faced by communities throughout the world. It's designed to develop you as a professional engineer and get you thinking about sustainable solutions.

Accredited by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM) and the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET)on behalf of the Engineering Council for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirement for registration as an Incorporated Engineer and partially meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Engineer.

Modules

The modules listed below are examples from the last academic year. There may be some changes before you start your course. For the very latest module information, check with the department directly.

Choose a year to see modules for a level of study:

Title: Bioengineering BEng course structure
UCAS code: H673
Years: 2021

Core modules:

Introduction to Electric and Electronic Circuits

This module introduces the concepts and analytical tools for predicting the behaviour of combinations of passive circuit elements, resistance, capacitance and inductance driven by ideal voltage and/or current sources which may be ac or dc sources. The ideas involved are important not only from the point of view of modelling real electronic circuits but also because many complicated processes in biology, medicine and mechanical engineering are themselves modelled by electric circuits. The passive ideas are extended to active electronic components; diodes, transistors and operational amplifiers and the circuits in which these devices are used. Transformers, magnetics and dc motors are also covered.

20 credits
Modelling, Analysis and Control

This module will introduce principles of modelling of simple continuous dynamical systems. This module also introduces analysis of linear models. It includes a detailed analysis of the dynamical behaviour of 1st and 2nd order systems linking behaviour to physical parameters, e.g. Rise time, settling time, overshoot, steady-state. Damping and damping ratio and resonance. Frequency response is also discussed. We will introduce control and feedback as a topic by providing examples of open-loop and closedloop control, and undertake detailed analysis of linear models with a focus on 1st and 2nd order systems. Students are introduced to simple practical feedback mechanisms, including PID controllers and performance criteria such as offset, stability, poles and zeros. You will learn about the principles of how to use Laplace Transforms to solve linear differential equations, and for system representation, using transfer functions and block diagram algebra. You will also develop an appreciation of frequency-domain implications of system analysis through the use of Fourier series. MATLAB is used to reinforce the simulation and analysis of all module contents and coursework assignments.

20 credits
Systems Engineering Mathematics I

This module contains the core mathematical competencies required by students for a systems engineering programme. This covers basic algebra and functions, elementary calculus (differentiation and integration), solution of low order differential equations, Taylor series and iterative methods, matrix algebra and simultaneous equations, vectors and complex numbers. The content is delivered within a systems engineering context. Student learning is encouraged by regular formative assessment and supportive resources. 

20 credits
Biomaterials I

This module introduces the human body from an engineering perspective; looking at it as a structure, a mechanism and a sensor. It then introduces both natural and replacement biomaterials discussing properties in relation to function using Ashby charts. Finally, the module discusses lessons that can be learnt from biomaterials by materials engineers in general (biomimetics). 

10 credits
Engineering with Living Systems 1

This module is an introduction to biological engineering covering the basics of host cell systems (bakers yeast, E. coli) exploited within the biomanufacturing industry i.e. cell types, structure, function. The working of the cell will be introduced; cell chemistry (biochemistry) and cell structure (macromolecules). These will be described in terms of products (e.g. protein biopharmaceuticals, fatty acid fuels), cell cultivation (basic and industrial microbiology, fermentation) and methods to improve cell productivities e.g. metabolic engineering, synthetic biology. Modelling of fermentation processes will be expanded through enzyme catalysis and Michelis Menten kinetics and linked to applications e.g. departmental relevant research.

10 credits
Introduction to Bioengineering

This module will introduce the application of engineering principles to biological and medical problems and give the student an appreciation of the breadth of bioengineering and identify to students what knowledge areas and skills are needed in order to contribute to the development of the fast growing field of bioengineering. It will also help create links with students and draw on the other modules that students will take in year 1

10 credits
Materials Under Stress

The module aims to provide students with a basic understanding of the mechanics. It will start from the introduction of forces and moments, degrees of freedom, supports and connections. It will look into building equilibrium equations and understanding free body diagrams. The module will then move to analysing the materials’ behaviour, looking at concepts of stress and strain, elastic and plastic response, and to give students knowledge of types of materials available in bioengineering practice with application to simple components.

The objectives are: to introduce fundamental concepts of solid mechanics and familiarise students with the basic analytical techniques required to understand component behaviour under load; to introduce a wide range of engineering materials, their properties and behaviour in tension, compression, bending, shear and torsion.; to underpin academic understanding of the mechanics of materials through laboratory experiments. The module will highlight Bioengineering relevant examples of mechanical behaviour of materials.

10 credits
Physics of Living Systems 2

The aim is to introduce biomechanical descriptions of the human body. We look at its structure and its performance as a physical machine. The structural characteristics of human bones and tissue are investigated, together with the mechanical functions of the skeleton and musculature. Simple fluid dynamic characteristics of the body are introduced, including descriptions of blood-flow in the arteries and veins and air-flow in the lungs.

10 credits
Tissue Structure and Function

This course introduces students to the tissues of the human body. The principal tissues that make up the body will be described including the cells, proteins and other extracellular components that make up the tissue. The structure of the tissue will be discussed in detail, in particular how it relates to its specific function in a healthy human body. Basic anatomy - how tissues combine to create organs and where each organ can be found in the human body will be studied. Practical classes on human anatomy and histology will be used to demonstrate tissue structure. Finally, how tissue damage causes loss of function will be considered. This course should enable students to understand enough about human tissues so that they can progress to understanding how engineering techniques are used to support, monitor and repair damaged human tissues. 

10 credits
Global Engineering Challenge Week

The Faculty-wide Global Engineering Challenge Week is a compulsory part of the first-year programme, and the project has been designed to develop student academic, transferable and employability skills as well as widen their horizons as global citizens. Working in multi-disciplinary groups of six, for a full week, all students in the Faculty choose from a number of projects arranged under a range of themes including Water, ICT, Waste Management and Energy with scenarios set in a developing country. Some projects are based on the Engineers Without Borders Challenge* and other projects have been suggested by an academic at the University of Makerere in Uganda (who is involved in developing solutions using IT systems for health, agriculture and resource problems in developing countries). Students are assessed on a number of aspects of being a professional engineer both by Faculty alumni and a number of local industrial engineers.
*The EWB Challenge is a design program coordinated internationally by Engineers Without Borders Australia and delivered in Australian, New Zealand, British and Irish universities. It provides students with the opportunity to learn about design, teamwork and communication through real, inspiring, sustainable and cross-cultural development projects. By participating in the EWB Challenge students are presented with a fantastic opportunity to design creative solutions to problems identified by real EWB projects. Each year, the EWB Challenge design brief is

The content of our courses is reviewed annually to make sure it's up-to-date and relevant. Individual modules are occasionally updated or withdrawn. This is in response to discoveries through our world-leading research; funding changes; professional accreditation requirements; student or employer feedback; outcomes of reviews; and variations in staff or student numbers. In the event of any change we'll consult and inform students in good time and take reasonable steps to minimise disruption. We are no longer offering unrestricted module choice. If your course included unrestricted modules, your department will provide a list of modules from their own and other subject areas that you can choose from.

Learning and assessment

Learning

The following are the main learning and teaching methods implemented within the programme:

  • lectures
  • tutorials
  • practical activities
  • coursework assignments (including oral, video and poster presentations)
  • Individual Investigative Project (final year)
  • design projects
  • online resources

We invest to create the right environment for you. That means outstanding facilities, study spaces and support, including 24/7 online access to our online library service.

Study spaces and computers are available to offer you choice and flexibility for your study. Our five library sites give you access to over 1.3 million books and periodicals. You can access your library account and our rich digital collections from anywhere on or off campus. Other library services include study skills training to improve your grades, and tailored advice from experts in your subject.

Learning support facilities and library opening hours

Assessment

Students are assessed via a mix of the following:

  • examinations
  • coursework assignments
  • lab work
  • online tests
  • reports
  • group projects
  • presentations
  • design projects
  • dissertations

Programme specification

This tells you the aims and learning outcomes of this course and how these will be achieved and assessed.

Find programme specification for this course

Entry requirements

With Access Sheffield, you could qualify for additional consideration or an alternative offer - find out if you're eligible

Standard offer
Access Sheffield offer

The A Level entry requirements for this course are:
AAB
including Maths and a science

The A Level entry requirements for this course are:
ABB
including Maths and a science

A Levels + additional qualifications | ABB, including Maths and a science + B in a relevant EPQ; ABB, including Maths and a science + B in AS or A Level Further Maths ABB, including Maths and a science + B in a relevant EPQ; ABB, including Maths and a science + B in AS or A Level Further Maths

International Baccalaureate | 34, with 6, 5 in Higher Level Maths and a science 33, with 5 in Higher Level Maths and a science

BTEC | DD in Engineering or Applied Science + A in A Level Maths DD in Engineering or Applied Science + B in A Level Maths

Scottish Highers + 2 Advanced Highers | AAABB + AB in Maths and a science AABBB + AB in Maths and a science

Welsh Baccalaureate + 2 A Levels | B + AA in Maths and a science B + AB in Maths and a science

Access to HE Diploma | 60 credits overall in a relevant subject, with 45 credits at Level 3 covering Maths and science units, including 36 credits at Distinction and 9 credits at Merit. Applicants are considered individually 60 credits overall in a relevant subject, with 45 credits at Level 3 covering Maths and science units, including 30 credits at Distinction and 15 credits at Merit. Applicants are considered individually

Mature students - explore other routes for mature students

English language requirements

You must demonstrate that your English is good enough for you to successfully complete your course. For this course we require: GCSE English Language at grade 4/C; IELTS grade of 6.5 with a minimum of 6.0 in each component; or an alternative acceptable English language qualification

Equivalent English language qualifications

Visa and immigration requirements

Other requirements
  • Science subjects include Physics, Chemistry or Biology/Human Biology

We also accept a range of other UK qualifications and other EU/international qualifications.

If you have any questions about entry requirements, please contact the department.

Bioengineering

Like the industry, bioengineering at Sheffield is interdisciplinary. You'll be taught by experts in materials, mechanical, control, electrical, chemical and biological engineering, computer science, medicine and biology.

From 3D printing and biophotonics, to tissue and bone engineering, we're helping to develop products that improve medical care and quality of life. Our research-led teaching produces multi-skilled graduates who can carry on that work.

You will develop the knowledge and skills employers are looking for by working closely with partners in the healthcare profession and in industry such as Philips, Johnson and Johnson and the NHS.

Learning and teaching takes place in one of the best bioengineering teaching spaces in the UK. The Diamond has industry-standard equipment for culturing and analysing cells, measuring the activity of the human body, mechanical and electrical testing of materials, 3D printing and customised software packages for developing bioengineering models.

Bioengineering

Why choose Sheffield?

The University of Sheffield

  A Top 100 university 2021
QS World University Rankings

  Top 10% of all UK universities
Research Excellence Framework 2014

  No 1 Students' Union in the UK
Whatuni Student Choice Awards 2019, 2018, 2017


Bioengineering

92% overall satisfaction

National Student Survey 2020

Ranked No.1 in the Russell Group for overall satisfaction

National Student Survey 2020


Graduate careers

Bioengineering

Our graduates have become professional engineers who design medical instruments, repair body tissue and solve clinical problems through research. They work closely with materials scientists, physicians, dentists, therapists and technologists to help benefit human health. The transferable skills gained on the course have also enabled graduates to take up careers in law, finance, scientific writing and other fields.

Fees and funding

Fees

Additional costs

The annual fee for your course includes a number of items in addition to your tuition. If an item or activity is classed as a compulsory element for your course, it will normally be included in your tuition fee. There are also other costs which you may need to consider.

Examples of what’s included and excluded

Funding your study

Depending on your circumstances, you may qualify for a bursary, scholarship or loan to help fund your study and enhance your learning experience.

Use our Student Funding Calculator to work out what you’re eligible for.

Visit us

University open days

There are four open days every year, usually in June, July, September and October. You can talk to staff and students, tour the campus and see inside the accommodation.

Open days: book your place

Taster days

At various times in the year we run online taster sessions to help Year 12 students experience what it is like to study at the University of Sheffield.

Upcoming taster sessions

Applicant days

If you've received an offer to study with us, we'll invite you to one of our applicant days, which take place between November and April. These applicant days have a strong department focus and give you the chance to really explore student life here, even if you've visited us before.

Campus tours

Campus tours run regularly throughout the year, at 1pm every Monday, Wednesday and Friday.

Book your place on a campus tour

Apply for this course

Make sure you've done everything you need to do before you apply.

How to apply When you're ready to apply, see the UCAS website:
www.ucas.com

The awarding body for this course is the University of Sheffield.

Recognition of professional qualifications: from 1 January 2021, in order to have any UK professional qualifications recognised for work in an EU country across a number of regulated and other professions you need to apply to the host country for recognition. Read information from the UK government and the EU Regulated Professions Database.

Our student protection plan

Terms and Conditions upon Acceptance of an Offer

Explore this course:

    2022-2023