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Annual Arts and Humanities Prokhorov Lectures

We host several lectures by world-leading academics and public intellectuals each year.

Our public lectures are part of the University of Sheffield's Global Humanities Initiative. They are open to academics, students, and the general public and are supplemented by lectures by Sheffield staff as well as a range of student-centred activities – such as exhibitions, workshops, and panel debates – facilitated by the Students' Union and the student societies in our arts and humanities departments. The main themes for our upcoming lectures are capitalist markets and their ethics; thinking about the future; and the politics of faith in a multicultural context.



Upcoming lectures

Upcoming lectures



Seeking the welfare of the city: what the church can contribute to the common good – Pete Wilcox, Bishop of Sheffield

  • Wednesday 26 June 2019 | 7.30pm
  • Sheffield Cathedral

Bishop Pete WilcoxAbout the talk

Pete Wilcox, Bishop of Sheffield, will explore how, in pursuit of the common good, the Church has something to offer to policy-making, as well as project-delivery, in what one might call a prophetic – and not merely pastoral – role.

This lecture is part of the God and the Good: Thinking Religion and Ethics lecture series.

About our speaker

The Rt Revd Dr Pete Wilcox has been ordained for over 30 years and has been Bishop of Sheffield since the summer of 2017, having been the Dean of Liverpool for the previous five years. He trained for the ordained ministry at Ridley Hall in Cambridge, after completing a degree in modern history at Durham.

Theological education and ministerial formation remain key interests for him, along with Bible teaching and expository preaching. He is the author of three books which attempt to make Bible commentary accessible: Living the Dream: Joseph for Today (2007), Walking the Walk: The Rise of King David for Today (2009) and Talking the Talk: The Fall of King David for Today (2011).



Albert Einstein on science, ethics, and religion – Alister McGrath (Oxford)

  • Tuesday 15 October 2019 | 7pm
  • Sheffield Cathedral
Alister McGrath

About the talk

This lecture marks the centenary of the confirmation of Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity in 1919 by exploring his far-reaching ideas about the relation of science, religion, and ethics. McGrath will explore Einstein’s rich and rewarding views about the need to hold together God, science, and the quest for goodness in the light of the latest scholarship, and explore how they can help us develop our own ways of thinking about these important issues.

This lecture is part of the God and the Good: Thinking Religion and Ethics lecture series.

About our speaker

Alister McGrath is the Andreas Idreos Professor of Science and Religion at the University of Oxford. After studying chemistry at Oxford, McGrath gained a doctorate in molecular biophysics before going on to study theology, and gain two further earned doctorates from Oxford University in theology and intellectual history. McGrath is the author of many highly acclaimed works, including his bestselling Christian Theology: An Introduction and his prizewinning biography C. S. Lewis: A Life.



Browse all Prokhorov Lectures

God and the Good lecture series

God and the Good: Thinking Religion and Ethics


A series of lectures by prominent public intellectuals, organised by Robert Stern in the Department of Philosophy.


Sheffield CathedralAre believers better people than atheists? Or does religion breed intolerance and violence? Are our moral concepts inextricably tied up with religious ideas? Do different religious traditions have fundamentally different ethical commitments? This series of talks, intended for a general audience, will consider such questions.

While most ethical traditions have a religious background, the increasing secularisation of modern society has put the connection between ethics and religion in question. Our talks will explore the history of this connection, as well as the questions: can religion illuminate ethical issues, and: can ethical issues illuminate religion?

For more details, see upcoming lectures.

You can also catch up on past lectures.