Nucleic acids in health and ageing

We study how DNA and RNA function in health and disease, how they evolve across the generations and the mechanisms that ensures their stability and function. We elucidate how perturbations in their function cause disease with a focus on cancer, ageing and neurological disorders.

Scientists have unlocked a crucial part of the mystery as to how our DNA can replicate and repair itself – something which is essential for all life forms.
Scientists have unlocked a crucial part of the mystery as to how our DNA can replicate and repair itself – something which is essential for all life forms.

On

Our research

As we continue to live longer, disease states related to ageing, such as cancer and dementias (eg Alzheimer's), are becoming more common. An important goal in our society is to ensure everyone is able to live into their later years in good health, without the large increase in risk of developing age-related pathologies as exists currently.

As academics, understanding the molecular mechanisms behind age-related pathologies can lead to new interventions and cures to ensure healthy ageing for future generations.

We study how DNA and RNA function in health and disease, how they evolve across the generations and the mechanisms that ensures their stability and function. We elucidate how perturbations in their function cause disease with a focus on cancer, ageing and neurological disorders. We exploit this knowledge to improve diagnosis and personalise clinical interventions.

We investigate the fundamental mechanisms of eukaryotic gene expression using a wide range of tools including high throughput computational approaches. This area has broad impact across the University and beyond in both the medical and biotechnology arenas.

We attract excellent scientists who have succeeded in winning prestigious grants and prizes from the Lister Institute, European Molecular Biology Organisation (EMBO) and Wellcome Trust. Our success revolves around world-class facilities and interdisciplinary research activities within and outside Sheffield, such as SITraN and SInFoNiA.


Recent research highlights


People

For further information and research opportunities, please see the staff page of individual researchers below:

Research institutes

Our research on Nucleic Acids in Health and Ageing is supported by and feeds into the following University Research Institutes.

Flagship institutes

The University’s four flagship institutes bring together our key strengths to tackle global issues, turning interdisciplinary and translational research into real-world solutions.