Julie GrayProf Julie Gray

Professor of Plant Molecular Biology

Room: C34b
Tel: 0114 222 4407
Email: j.e.gray@sheffield.ac.uk

Research

Research Precis

Stomata are pores that open to allow carbon dioxide into leaves for photosynthesis and close to reduce water loss. Stomata are important because their behaviour affects crop productivity, and global carbon and water cycles. We study how stomatal aperture and stomatal development are controlled by the plant, and how environmental change affects both the number of stomata that are produced and their sensitivity. We use molecular genetic techniques to study the evolution of stomatal signalling pathways which are believed to have been important for the greening of the earth over 400 million years ago. Recently we have begun to translate our finding into important crops including wheat and rice, to improve drought tolerance and water use efficiency.

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Research Keywords

Plant development, stomata, environmental signalling

Teaching

Level 4 Modules

Level 3 Modules

Level 1 Modules

Career History

Career History

  • 2008 - present: Professor, Dept. of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Sheffield
  • 1993 - 2007: Lecturer/ Senior Lecturer/Reader Dept. of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Sheffield
  • 1990 - 1993: University Research Fellow, University of Nottingham
  • 1989 – 1990: Research Fellow, University of Melbourne
  • 1985 - 1989: PhD, University of Nottingham

University Committees









































Selected Publications

Journal articles

Chapters

  • Hunt L & Gray JE (2012) Peptides modulating development of specialized cells In Gehring C & Irving, HR (Ed.), Plant Signaling Peptides (pp. 93-93). Springer Science & Business Media

Conference proceedings papers

  • Casson SA, Franklin KA, Gray JE, Grierson CS, Whitelam GC & Hetherington AM (2009) Phytochrome B and PIF4 regulate stomatal development in response to light quantity. COMPARATIVE BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY A-MOLECULAR & INTEGRATIVE PHYSIOLOGY, Vol. 153A(2) (pp S209-S209)
  • Panagopulos M, Worrall D, Liang Y, Alvarez S, Holroyd G, Spiegel S, Gray J & Hetherington A (2008) The role of sphingosine kinase in plant cell signalling. COMPARATIVE BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY A-MOLECULAR & INTEGRATIVE PHYSIOLOGY, Vol. 150(3) (pp S195-S195)
  • Lindsay S, Hunt L, Gray J & Hetherington A (2008) Analysis of the R2R3-MYB transcription factor family identifies genes involved in stomatal function. COMPARATIVE BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY A-MOLECULAR & INTEGRATIVE PHYSIOLOGY, Vol. 150(3) (pp S195-S195)
  • Gray J & Hunt L (2008) Control of stomatal development. COMPARATIVE BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY A-MOLECULAR & INTEGRATIVE PHYSIOLOGY, Vol. 150(3) (pp S144-S144)
  • McAinsh MR, Gray JE, Hetherington AM, Leckie CP & Ng C (2000) Ca2+ signalling in stomatal guard cells. BIOCHEMICAL SOCIETY TRANSACTIONS, Vol. 28 (pp 476-481)
  • PICTON S, GRAY JE & GRIERSON D (1995) THE MANIPULATION AND MODIFICATION OF TOMATO FRUIT RIPENING BY EXPRESSION OF ANTISENSE RNA IN TRANSGENIC PLANTS. EUPHYTICA, Vol. 85(1-3) (pp 193-202)
  • GRAY JE, MCCLURE BA, HARING V, ANDERSON MA & CLARK AE (1991) SELF-INCOMPATIBILITY AS A MODEL FOR CELL-CELL RECOGNITION IN FLOWERING PLANTS. PLANT MOLECULAR BIOLOGY 2, Vol. 212 (pp 527-536)
  • GRIERSON D, SMITH CJS, WATSON CF, MORRIS PC, GRAY JE, DAVIES K, PICTON SJ, TUCKER GA, SEYMOUR G, SCHUCH W, BIRD CR & RAY J (1990) REGULATION OF GENE-EXPRESSION IN TRANSGENIC TOMATO PLANTS BY ANTISENSE RNA AND RIPENING-SPECIFIC PROMOTERS. GENETIC ENGINEERING OF CROP PLANTS (pp 115-125)