Research Supervisor Details

This page provides additional information about our research supervisors. You can either browser supervisors by department or search for them by keyword. Most supervisors also have a personal webpage where you can find out more about them.

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Dr Praveen Thokala
P.Thokala@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My research interests are:

  • Healthcare modelling
  • Health economics
  • Multi-criteria decision analysis
  • Optimisation
Professor Allan Wailoo
a.j.wailoo@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Research interests
  • Economic evaluation including alongside clinical trials and decision modelling
  • Analysis of patient level data, particularly around health utilities
  • Social values and decision making, including equity and procedural preferences
Professor Alan Brennan
a.brennan@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My fundamental interest is in mathematical modelling approaches to inform decision making in health and healthcare.

I have been heavily involved in health technology assessment and health economic evaluation of pharmaceuticals and interventions for both government bodies in the UK e.g NICE and internationally and also with pharmaceutical industry.

More recently I have engaged in a series of projects around wider behavioural and public health related modelling.

  • Use of modelling and data analysis to assess broader interventions
  • Assessing cost-effectiveness of new treatments for NICE
  • Bayesian methods in cost-effectiveness analysis to inform future research priorities (CHEBS)
  • Value of information and Bayesian methods to inform research priorities
  • Cost effectiveness modelling methods
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Diabetes, obesity, CHD Modelling
  • Pharmaco-economics
    - Alzheimer's
    - Renal disease
  • Health systems modelling
    - Cervical screening
    - Ambulance services
    - Re-engineering
Professor Paul Tappenden
p.tappenden@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

• Health economic modelling
• Economic analyses of therapies for multiple sclerosis
• Economic analyses of cancer therapies
• Whole disease modelling

Dr Hazel Squires
h.squires@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My research interests involve the use of decision-analytic modelling to help with policy decisions. In particular, this includes the use of health economic modelling for assessing the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of Public Health interventions. Key methodological interests include conceptual modelling and individual-level simulation.

Professor Barend van Hout
b.a.vanhout@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

I have extensive experience in modelling and have contributed to the methodology of economic evaluation in various areas. In 1993 I was one of the earliest researchers to apply discrete event models and was the first to apply a non-parametric method to estimate costs in the presence of censoring[1]. In 1994 I was the first to apply Fieller´s approach to calculate confidence intervals around cost-effectiveness ratios, and I introduced the acceptability curve, which is now a well known concept in cost effectiveness analysis[2]. In 1996 I was one of the first to apply probabilistic sensitivity analysis[3]. In 2000 I was one of the initial people to explore Bayesian techniques in economic evaluation[4]. I have had work published on discounting[5] and estimating utility functions[6].

I am one of the founding members of the EuroQol group and I currently enjoy chairing the valuation task force within the EQ-5D group. My experience covers several therapeutic areas, including renal disease, cancer, osteoporosis, sepsis, schizophrenia, blood safety and most notably cardiovascular disease. My main interest concerns the use of elegant techniques, mostly to solve practical problems, but sometimes also because of the elegance itself.

Dr Robin Purshouse
r.purshouse@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering

Research interests:

Robin's research aims to help improve how we identify and choose between possible solutions to a problem, with a particular focus on the process of policy appraisal. There are a number of factors that make policy appraisal a challenging research area:

  • Multiple trade-offs
  • Multiple stakeholders
  • Deep uncertainty
  • Cognitive challenge
Professor John Brazier
j.e.brazier@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

SF-6D preference-based index

  • Developed by Brazier et al (2002). Syntax files available fromhttp://www.shef.ac.uk/scharr/sections/heds/mvh/sf-6d
  • International valuation studies in Japan, Hong Kong, Portugal, Brazil, Australia and Singapore
  • Comparisons to other generic preference-based measures

Deriving preference-based measures from condition specific measures

  • Published studies: Kings Health Questionnaire, Atopic Dermatitis in Children, Menopausal specific health related quality of life questionnaire, Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire, Overactive Bladder Questionnaire, Sexual Functioning Questionnaire.
  • Current studies: Dementia Quality of Life (DEMQoL), Epilepsy QoL battery.

Modelling preference data

  • Applying Bayesian methods to estimating preference-based algorithms
  • Estimating health state values from ordinal data (rank and DCE)

Validity of EQ-5D across medical conditions.

Mapping from condition specific and other generic measures onto EQ-5D

  • Recent and ongoing trial based economic evaluations: Complementary therapy (YACBAC trial), treatments for varicose veins, computerised cognitive behavioural therapy in MS, Borderline Personality Disorder (SPeDi trial)
  • Model based economic evaluations: computerised cognitive behavioural therapy (NICE), Dialectical behavioural therapy for Borderline Personality Disorder (HTA)

Examining the relationship between health and well-being (and the role of adaptation)

Professor James Marshall
james.marshall@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Computer Science

Research interests

Professor Marshall's research interests cover modelling of collective behaviour, particularly in social insects, evolutionary theory, decision theory, robotics, and theoretical neuroscience

Professor Robert Harrison
r.f.harrison@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering

Research interests:

Computational Data Modelling: neural networks; machine learning; kernel machines; support vector machines; generalised linear models; clustering; dimensionality reduction; pattern recognition; pattern classification; pattern discrimination; regression; function approximation; Bayesian analysis; Gaussian processes; system identification; Volterra series; polynomial models; NARX/NARMAX modelling; parsimony; sparsity control; covariate selection; model selection; structure detection; iterative majorization; majorize/minimize algorithms; minorize/maximize algorithms; kernel density estimation; missing/incomplete data problems; EM methods; extended Kalman filtering; unscented Kalman filtering; nonstationary random processes.

Applications: clinical decision support; identification of acute coronary syndromes; chest pain diagnosis; prediction of treatment failure and complications in diabetes sufferers; trauma prognosis; space weather forecasting; geomagnetic storm prediction; analysis of thyroid function; analysis of biological pathways; computational drug discovery; virtual screening; chronobiology; circadian rhythm analysis;  optimal therapy scheduling via non-linear optimal control; prognosis in complex technological systems e.g. gas turbine engine systems;

Professor Visakan Kadirkamanathan
visakan@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering

Research interests:

My research interests belong to the broad category of signal and information processing. My research activities are partly in the Intelligent Systems, Decision and Control related research carried out within the Rolls-Royce University Technology Centre and partly in the Centre for Signal Processing and Complex Systems. They include both theoretical and applications research, and also external collaborations with other Sheffield Departments and Industries.

The main research themes are:

  • Modelling and Identification of natural and engineered complex systems
  • Spatiotemporal system identification with applications in life, physical and social sciences
  • Fault detection, diagnosis and prognosis with application to aircraft engines
  • Intelligent systems decision support and applications in aerospace and biomedicine
  • Autonomous and self-organised swarms and agent systems
Dr Maria-Cruz Villa-Uriol
m.villa-uriol@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Computer Science

Dr Maria-Cruz Villa-Uriol's main research interests are:

  • the personalisation of models using computational imaging and modelling techniques, 
  • the composition of scientific workflows, 
  • and the use and development of data-driven decision-making strategies to support clinical decisions using heterogeneous data sources.

The data sources typically used in ther research are:

  • personalised VPH (Virtual Physiological Human) models, 
  • clinical databases, 
  • mobile sensors capturing a wide variety of variables describing an individual and his/her environment and mobile healthcare. 

Her primary area of interest is in the cardiovascular domain with an emphasis in clinical translation.

She is member of the Organisations, Information and Knowledge Group (Oak), INSIGNEO institute for in silico Modelling and Center for Assistive Technology and Connected Healthcare (CATCH).

Professor Mahdi Mahfouf
m.mahfouf@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering

Research interests:

Intelligent Systems Based Signal Processing, Modelling and Control in Biomedicine

  • Neural-Fuzzy Modelling and Decision Support in Respiratory Intensive Care Units (ICU) and Cardiac Intensive Care Units (CICU).
  • Signal Processing and Physiological Modelling for Operational Functional State (OFS) Identification in Humans: Investigations into Man-Machine Interactions.
  • Model-Based Predictive Control of Anaesthesia.
  • Fuzzy and Neural-Fuzzy Classification, Modelling and Control of Anaesthesia.

A Systems Engineering Approach to Modelling and Optimisation for Metal Processing

Professor James Chilcott
j.b.chilcott@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

* Modelling in public health

* Modelling in cancer and cancer screening

* Methodological modelling interests including:

  • the modelling process and errors in HTA models
  • cognitive mapping for systematic reviews in complex settings
  • structural uncertainty in models
  • Bayesian analysis of joint disease natural history and test characteristics in screening
  • value of information methods
  • probabilistic sensitivity analysis methods
  • meta modelling
  • information gathering processes for models
Professor George Panoutsos
g.panoutsos@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering

My research interests lie in the broad areas of Intelligent Systems, Model-Based Decision Support and Optimisation, as well as Human-Centric Systems. Key goal in my research is to create computational paradigms that exhibit human-centric features, such as natural-language feedback, enhanced human-machine interaction and advanced cognitive behaviour.

Key theoretical themes include:

  • Data-driven modelling and optimisation
  •  Real-time model-based process monitoring and decision support
  •  Feature selection and self-learning systems
  • Novelty detection and natural language feedback
  • Granular Computing and Computing With Words

 

Applied research themes include:

Complex Manufacturing Systems (Aerospace, Automotive, Rail)

  • Model-based autonomous systems, Process Optimisation, Monitoring and Decision Support
  • Example Applications: friction-based joining processes, precision machining, laser-based welding and cladding, additive manufacturing, selective layer melting, steel making.

Bioengineering Systems (Clinical and healthcare applications)    

  • Disease forecasting
  • Clinical decision support systems
  • Example applications: Electrical Impedance Tomography, Prognosis in Spinal Fusion Surgery, and Forecasting in Bladder Cancer

           

 

 

Mr Matthew Franklin
matt.franklin@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My current interests are in the use of routinely collected care data for the purpose of costing analysis, economic analysis and decision modelling. I also have an interest in the capability-approach and extra-wefarism and its conceptual and practical application to economic evaluations and decision making, and the conceptual and practical use of outcome measures in general.

I can supervise students interested in the use of large databases of rountinely collected care data for health economic analysis and decision modelling problems. These databases include, but are not limited to:

  • Secondary Uses Service (SUS)
  • Hospital Episode Statistics (HES)
  • Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD)
  • ResearchOne
The aforementioned are some of the more commonly used databases, but I have experience using rountinely collected care data from primary, secondary, intermediate, mental health, ambulance and social care services. 
 
I can also supervise students interested in the conceptual and practical basis of using outcome measures for the purpose of economic evaluation; this includes those students interested in the extra-welfarist approach to welfare economics in relation to the market for health and healthcare.
 
I have more specific interests in research focussed on frail older people, dementia, cognitive impairement and more generalised mental health conditions.

 

Dr Phil Shackley
p.shackley@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Research interests
  • Developing and applying the contingent valuation methodology, in particular the technique of willingness to pay. Applications include: estimating the social value of a quality adjusted life year (QALY); using willingness to pay values to aid priority setting in publicly-financed health care systems; investigating how willingness to pay can and should be used alongside randomised trials; the use of willingness to pay to evaluate the benefits of public health interventions such as the fluoridation of drinking water supplies and the supplementation of flour with folic acid; evaluating minimally invasive surgery; assessing patient preferences for diagnostic radiology; and assessing preferences for an expanded newborn screening programme.
  • The identification, measurement and valuation of (dis)benefits that are not captured in the QALY approach. Applications include: assessing the value of patient health cards; eliciting patient preferences for out-of-hours primary care services; establishing and quantifying the preferences of mental health service users for day hospital care; eliciting patient preferences for the organisation of vascular services; and assessing preferences for access to a general practitioner.
  • The application of economic evaluation techniques to assess the efficiency of health care programmes and interventions. Applications include: screening in primary care; antenatal screening; management of lower respiratory tract infection in general practice; computerised cognitive behavioural therapy for anxiety and depression; methods for assessing patients with intermittent claudication; drug treatments for epilepsy; stroke incidence and prevention in Tanzania; venous leg ulcers; and treating upper limb spasticity due to stroke with botulinum toxin.
Mr John Stevens
j.w.stevens@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Research interests
  • the application of Bayesian methods in drug development
  • statistical methods in health economics
  • evidence synthesis
  • sample size determination under uncertainty
  • adaptive dose finding
Dr Dawn Walker
d.c.walker@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Computer Science

Research interests

  • Agent (individual) based Modelling in predicting emergent properties of biological tissues
  • Multiscale Modelling in biological and biomedical applications
  • Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) for the diagnosis of early cancerous changes in epithelial tissues


Professor Mark Strong
m.strong@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My Research interests

I have three related research interests that fall under the general banner of Uncertainty Quantification: (1) how do we properly account for all relevant uncertainties when we build a computer model of a physical, biological or social system? (2) how do we (efficiently) compute value of information? (3) how do we work out the value of a computer model? How much should we pay to make a simple model more complex? When do we stop increasing the complexity of a model?

Jeremy OakleyJim Chilcott and I have proposed an "internal" discrepancy-based method for managing model uncertainty. See this paper in JRSS Series C, and this paper in SIAM/ASA Journal of Uncertainty Quantification. The method is discussed in more detail in my PhD thesis.

We have proposed an efficient method for computing partial EVPI. This method works for any number of parameters of interest and requires only the PSA sample. See this open access paper in Medical Decision Making. R functions to implement the method can be downloaded here. This paper uses Gaussian process-based methods that are nicely described in the  Managing Uncertainty in Complex Models (MUCM) toolkit.

The partial EVPI method extends nicely to the computation of EVSI. See here for our open access paper on the efficient computation of EVSI.

Professor Sarah Brown
sarah.brown@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Economics

Research interests

Sarah's research interests lie in the area of applied microeconometrics focusing on labour economics, the economics of education and, more recently, household financial decision-making. Her research has focused on individual, household and firm-level data as well as matched workplace-employee data.

Examples of research projects include empirical analysis of the reservation wages of the unemployed (funded by the ESRC) and empirical analysis of wage growth, human capital and risk aversion (funded by the Leverhulme Trust). Her current research focuses on household financial decision-making and attitudes towards risk. Sarah is interested in supervising PhD students in applied microeconometrics.

Professor Andrew Simpson
andrew.simpson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

His current research interests are wide ranging but include:

How, or indeed whether, organisations use data in decision making processes. This also includes an interest in how data / information is misused.

The application of forecasting techniques within supply chains. In particular military spare parts supply chains, where the intermittent and low volumes of demand make forecasting complicated.

Lean within public sector contexts and how this is applied and the difficulties faced when trying to implement lean solutions.

Operations Strategy and how organisations think through their operational strategic choice during product design within regulated industries, with a focus on the regenerative medicine industry.

Professor Patricia Lawford
p.lawford@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease
The Medical School

Research interests

My main activity is in the area of cardiovascular biomechanics and in cardiovascular implant devices. My key interest is the development and use of computational models for the study of cardiovascular disease and its treatment. My primary aim is the translation of modelling tools to clinical workflows and the use of predictive modelling in treatment planning.

Dr Philip Powell
p.a.powell@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of Economics

Combining a career in psychology and economics, Philip's research interests are in understanding behaviour, well-being, and decision-making through multidisciplinary approaches. He is an expert in behavioural and experimental economics, and has particular interest in the role of emotions in decision-making and psychological well-being processes. Philip is currently Research Fellow on the “InsEAD-EX: A mobile experimental economics portal (the ‘lab-in-a-bag’)”, which seeks to develop the Department’s capacity for experimental methods and multidisciplinary collaboration.

Dr Hualiang Wei
w.hualiang@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering
Research interests:
  • Identification and modelling for complex nonlinear systems
    • NARMAX methodology and applications.
    • Artificial neural networks (ANN), radial basis function networks (RBFN), wavelet neural networks and multiresolution wavelet models, computational statistics, machine learning, intelligent computation and data mining.
    • Regression analysis, parameter estimation and optimization, sparse representation.
    • Nonlinear and nonstationary (time-varying) signal processing, system identification and data modelling.
    • Spatio-temporal system identification and modelling.
  • Bioscience signal processing and data modelling
    • Neurophysiology and neuro-imaging data modelling and analysis.
    • EEG, fMRI and ECG data processing, modelling and analysis.
    • Data based classification, pattern recognition, anomaly detection, with applications in clinical and medical diagnosis and prognosis.
  • Forecasting and analysis of complex stochastic dynamical processes with applications in
    • Space weather systems.
    • Environmental systems.
    • Computational economics and finance.
  • New concepts and methodologies developments for the identification and analysis of nonlinear complex systems.
  • Applications and developments of signal processing, system identification and data modelling to control engineering, bioengineering, neuroscience, systems/synthetic biology, environments, space weather and other emerging areas.
Dr Paul Morris
paul.morris@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease
The Medical School

My research interests are in computational modelling of cardiac physiology and heart disease. I am interested in the construction, development and validation of computational workflows which predict cardiac physiology. My current work is focused on the development of a model of intra-coronary physiology. Our VIRTUheartTM model computes virtual fractional flow reserve (vFFR) a marker of coronary artery disease significance and a guide to treatment.

Dr Christopher Carroll
c.carroll@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Research interests
  • Systematic review and evidence synthesis of medical, health and social science topics, including qualitative and mixed method evidence synthesis
  • The Health Technology Assessment (HTA) process
  • Information retrieval and programme evaluation (implementation fidelity) research
Dr Catherine Jackson
c.c.jackson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Urban Studies and Planning

Research interests

My research focuses on exploring the functioning of local property markets, from the perspective of improving the knowledge and information base for property investment decision-making. This focus highlights the role of local characteristics and context in market performance.

Specific interests include - local retail rental determination; retail policy and market performance; and the operation of office and industrial markets.

Mr Paul Shepley
p.shepley@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

Research interest

Dr Shepley's primary research interest lies in physical modelling of construction processes.

Professor Karl Taylor
k.b.taylor@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Economics

Research interests

Karl's research interests lie in the area of applied microeconometrics focusing on labour economics, the economics of education and, household financial decision-making. His research has focused on individual, household and firm-level data including matched workplace-employee data. Examples of research projects include empirical analysis of the reservation wages of the unemployed (ESRC) and empirical analysis of wage growth, human capital and risk aversion (Leverhulme Trust). He has been involved in advisory reports for the Home Office and more recently the Department of Health looking at the minimum pricing of alcohol. Karl is interested in supervising PhD students in applied microeconometrics.

Dr Peter Dodd
p.j.dodd@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

  • Infectious disease modelling.
  • The epidemiology of TB, particularly in settings with high-HIV prevalence, and population-level TB interventions.
  • TB in children.
  • Individual-based modelling methodologies.
  • Methods for model calibration and uncertainty analysis.
Dr Joel Foreman
j.foreman@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Materials Science and Engineering
A combination of experimental and modelling approaches to polymer and polymer composite science. Development of experimental structure property relationships in polymers of use in the composites industry, primarily epoxy and phenolic resins. Various modelling techniques for predicting material properties ranging from continuum to atomistic and some finite element methods. 

Research interests
  • Tailoring the structure of epoxy resins by altering the resin/hardener chemistry and stoichiometry to understand how the chemical structure influences thermo-mechanical properties.
  • Tailoring the structure of phenolic resins by altering the reactant stoichiometry, cure schedule and catalysts to understand how the chemical structure influences thermo-mechanical properties.
  • Monitoring epoxy and phenolic resin cure through DSC, DEA and NIR to understand how the curing reactions influence the final structure of thermosetting resins.
  • Manufacture and mechanical property testing of composite panels based on epoxy and phenolic resins in order to improve properties by tailoring the properties of the matrix phase.
  • Group Interaction Modelling of polymer properties.
  • Multi-scale modelling of polymer composites using Group Interaction Modelling for material properties of the fibre and matrix combined with FEA and statistical fibre failure model for composite properties.
  • Predicting and measuring the effect diluents (e.g. water) have on polymer and polymer composite properties.
Dr Ian Dawson
I.Dawson@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of Physics and Astronomy

Research Interests

  • Radiation simulation, measurement and mitigation
  • Modelling silicon detector radiation damage
  • Particle detector technologies
  • Soft QCD physics at the Large Hadron Collider

Research Projects

Professor Claudia Mazza
c.mazza@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering
Research interests

Claudia's research has always been focused on human movement Biomechanics and on the definition of quantative methods for the clinical assessment of an individual locomotor and postural ability.

  • Biomechanics
  • Gait analysis
  • Technologies for human movement analysis
  • Personalised musculoskeletal modelling
  • Wearable inertial sensors
  • Activity monitoring
Dr Shannon Li
xinshan.li@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering
Dr Li's research interest is in the human musculoskeletal system, particularly on personalised finite element modelling of bones and skeletal muscles. These models are constructed based on medical images such as CT and MRI. Dr Li has ongoing research projects with the Sheffield Children's Hospital and Jessop Wing. Her work focused on: (1) providing a quantitative tool for the diagnosis of unexplained fracture in children, (2) tools to monitor women's health, (3) biomechanics of skeletal muscles to understand the healthy and diseased states.

Research keywords
  • Biomechanics of bones and skeletal muscles
  • Nonlinear finite element analysis
  • Organ-level modelling of the musculoskeletal system
  • Continuum mechanics
Dr Alexander Fletcher
A.G.Fletcher@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

I am a mathematical biologist. I develop and apply mathematical and computational models to study the growth and dynamics of tissues in embryonic development and in disease.  I use a variety of modelling approaches to address questions in this area, from compartment models to individual cell-based and multiscale models, often in close collaboration with experimental biologists.

Professor Jonathan Linton
j.linton@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research

Professor Linton’s research considers management challenges that involve uncertainty and non-steady state conditions. This includes: non-steady state behavior of technology-intense entrepreneurial firms, assessment and management of R&D projects and portfolios, firms and knowledge pathways to commercialization, opportunity recognition of the economic and social benefits associated with science and technological discoveries, close loop supply chains, continuous and discontinuous learning, and unintended consequences of innovation and change. Besides being trained as a traditional quantitative social science researcher, Jonathan utilizes qualitative research or modeling depending on what set of approached is most appropriate for the question or problem of interest.

PhD Supervision

Jonathan is interested in supervising PhD students in the following areas:

  • Management of Emerging technologies (Internet of Things (IOT), Additive Manufacture (3D Printing), Quantum Technologies, Factor of the Future, Advanced Manufacturing, Advanced Materials)
  • Decision support relating to management of technologies or big science, Technology, Innovation Policy, R&D Management.
  • Commercialization of Innovation
  • Emerging Technology Supply Chains
  • Real Options and Portfolios
  • Close Loop Supply Chains
  • Decision Support for Process Innovation
  • R&D Management
  • Technological Entrepreneurship
Dr Andrew Bell
andrew.j.d.bell@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield Methods Institute

Before moving to Sheffield, Andy was a lecturer at the University of Bristol, where he also completed his undergraduate degree (in Geography) and PhD (in Advanced Quantitative Methods). His current substantive research focuses on mental health from a life course perspective, but also spans a diverse range of other subject areas, including geography, political science, social epidemiology and economics. Methodologically, Andy’s interests are in the development and application of multilevel models, with work focusing on age-period-cohort analysis and fixed and random effects models

Dr Joab Winkler
j.r.winkler@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Computer Science

Research interests

Joab Winkler’s main research interests are image processing, and  algebraic and numerical properties of curves and surfaces in computer-aided design systems.

  • IMAGE PROCESSING: The removal of blur and other degradations from an image arises in many applications and it may be considered a preprocessing operation before the image is interrogated for, for example, medical diagnosis. The most challenging problem arises when prior information on the source of the degradations and the exact image is not known, in which case the problem is called blind image deconvolution. My research is concerned with the application of polynomial computations, implemented using structure-preserving matrix methods, for the solution of this problem. The next stage of this work on image improvement is its extension from static images to video images for the observation of dynamic events, for example, the flow of blood.
 
  • GEOMETRIC MODELLING: Curves and surfaces in computer aided design systems are represented by polynomials. Computational problems arise because the coefficients of these polynomials are corrupted by noise due to manufacturing tolerances and numerical approximations, and robust computations on polynomials are therefore required. Recent work on these robust computations includes the computation of a structured low rank approximation of the Sylvester resultant matrix, and the devlopment of a polynomial root solver for the determination of multiple roots of the theoretically exact form of a polynomial, when the coefficients of the given polynomial are corrupted by added noise.
 
  • FEATURE SELECTION: Many problems in science require the identification of the most important features that characterise a system, such that the expected response of the system to new data can be accurately predicted. Problems arise because the given data that is available to identify these important features is usually insufficient to define the system uniquely, which implies that the equation to be solved has an infinite number of solutions, This raises the question as to the solution that is selected from this infinite set of solutions, and the criterion used for this selection. My research is concerned with the development of mathematical theory and methods for the selection of the best solution, defined using a specified criterion. The features that characterise a system may be a combination of numerical data, binary data and categorical data, and a mathematical model that describes a system must include these three classes of data. This problem has many applications, including bioinformatics, signal analysis, atmospheric physics, and in general, problems in which the response (output) is a function of many variables (inputs), only some of which are important and must therefore be identified.
Professor Grant Bigg
Grant.Bigg@Sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Geography

Research interests

Ocean and climate modelling, marine climate change specialising in polar and tropical regions, with special interest in synoptic or meso-scale weather systems. Palaeoceanography: modelling and interpreting observations. Icebergs, and their role in the ocean's freshwater flux, both today and in the Quaternary. The interactions between climate change and society.


Dr Salam Khamas
s.khamas@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering

Research interests

  • Electromagnetics and mathematical modelling
  • Software development
  • Mobile communications
  • High temperature superconducting antennas
  • Optical communications


Dr Steve Maddock
s.maddock@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Computer Science

Research interests

Dr Steve Maddock's research interests include computer facial modelling and animation, surface deformation, AR and VR technology and applications, and sketch-based interfaces for simulation.

Dr Songdong Shao
s.shao@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

Research interests

Dr Shao's major research interests are river hydraulics and coastal hydrodynamics as well as mesh free numerical modelling techniques such as Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH).

Professor Shaun Quegan
S.Quegan@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

Research interests

I work on the physics, measurements, models, statistics, system analysis and sensor properties that all form part of measuring aspects of the land-atmosphere carbon cycle, with a particular emphasis on exploiting satellite measurements to improve carbon cycle models. A lot of my work is to do with forests, including measuring their biomass (I'm the lead scientist on the European Space Agency BIOMASS mission) and detecting and quantifying tropical deforestation.

Dr Mike Stannett
m.stannett@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Computer Science

Research interests

Dr Stannett is interested in many areas of research, including Heterotic Computing, Unconventional Computing, Physics and Computation, Hypercomputation Theory, and First-Order Relativity Theories. He also has strong research links with members of the Algebraic Logic group at the Alfréd Rényi Institute of Mathematics (Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest).

Dr Lingzhong Guo
l.guo@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering

Research interests:

  • Identification of spatio-temporal systems and partial differential equations
  • Frequency domain analysis of nonlinear infinite dimensional systems
  • Proxy measurement, surrogate modelling, and model reduction
  • Multiscale modelling of biomedical system
Dr Julie Jones
Julie.Jones@Sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Geography

Research interests

  • Reconstruction and analysis of Southern Hemisphere Atmospheric Circulation from proxy data, long instrumental records, and climate model simulations
  • The design and analysis of global climate model (GCM) simulations for the mid- and late-Holocene and development of methodologies for systematic comparison of these simulations with proxy data
  • Regional climate modelling with a focus on the European Alps
  • Links between atmospheric circulation and transport of air pollution


Dr Felix Ng
F.Ng@Sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Geography

I am a mathematician who uses a modelling approach to understand glaciological phenomena. 

Some of my key research interests:

  • Large-scale behaviour of glaciers and ice sheets, and their environmental interactions
  • Mathematical models of glacial processes and landforms
  • Polar ice on Mars
  • Ice-crystal physics
  • Radar stratigraphy of polar ice sheets
  • Ice-stream flow
  • Glacial outburst floods
Professor Sarah Baker
s.r.baker@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Research interests

My principal research interest relates to the psychological and social factors which influence how people cope with chronic oral health conditions and their treatment. Such conditions include cleft lip and palate, oral cancer, orthognathic conditions, xerostomia, periodontal disease and edentulousness. This programme of work investigates the psychosocial factors which influence individual’s experiences of their oral health and the impact on well-being and quality of life. Understanding the role of such factors – sense of coherence, self esteem, social support networks, coping strategies, stress and resilience – allows us to explore potential mechanisms by which oral health impacts on individual’s daily lives and, in turn, develop intervention strategies that have the potential to improve health and well-being.

Other research interests include a critical examination of the conceptual foundations of oral health quality of life concepts, together with methodological and statistical approaches within the OHQoL field. Much of this research involves modelling the biopsychosocial determinants of oral health and well-being across the lifecourse using statistical techniques such as, structural equation modelling. 


Professor Geraint Jewell
g.jewell@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering
Research interests
  • Self-bearing electrical machines
  • Power dense electrical machines and actuators for aerospace and marine applications
  • Valve actuation
  • Electromagnetic modelling of novel devices
Dr Hassan Ghadbeigi
h.ghadbeigi@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Dr Ghadbeigi’s research activities are in the field of machining, mechanics of deformation in manufacturing operations, experimental mechanics, mechanics of materials and surface treatments applied to metallic alloys as well as damage, fatigue and fracture. Shot-peening and surface treatments are used to improve fatigue life of mechanical components. Modelling techniques including implicit/explicit and Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) finite element are used to simulate manufacturing operations (machining and thermo-mechanical processes) and damage/fracture process in metallic and non-metallic materials.  Multi-scale mechanical testing is carried out combined with full-field optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy based Digital Image Correlation to characterize micro/macro deformation and damage mechanisms

Dr Sophie Whyte
Sophie.Whyte@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My broad research is focused on mathematical modelling within health economics. I have gained significant expertise and experience in two related areas:

  • Bayesian calibration of cancer natural history models: This is my main methodological research theme, please see MDM publication http://mdm.sagepub.com/content/31/4/625 and Example Excel model using the Metropolis Hastings algorithm to calibrate a state transition model available to down load from the Downloads box)
  • Early diagnosis of cancer: I have substantial experience having worked on more than 15 projects in this area of applied research.
  • In addition to these main research themes I have undertaken research to inform policy making: Health Technology Assessment (HTA) for NICE (https://www.shef.ac.uk/scharr/sections/heds/collaborations/tag) , and research as part of the Policy Research Unit in Economic Evaluation of Health and Care Interventions (EEPRU) for DH (http://www.eepru.org.uk/)
Dr Kevin Hughes
K.J.Hughes@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Kevin's research covers a range of topics related to fuel combustion, fuel degradation and deposit formation, pollutant chemistry, proton exchange membrane fuel cells, and process modelling in carbon capture and storage systems.

In the area of combustion, degradation, and pollutant chemistry, the approach is a combination of experimental and theoretical investigation; for example the elucidation of a simple laminar flame structure by a combination of conventional species sampling techniques allied to laser diagnostic probing of the flame structure using the technique of planar laser induced fluorescence. This provides data that allows for the validation of detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms. These mechanisms are constructed by a variety of means ranging from experimental measurements of individual reaction rates, crude estimation by analogy, group additivity based methods, detailed theoretical calculation using quantum chemistry methods, and the application of master equation models to calculated potential energy surfaces. Insight is further gained by the application of sensitivity analysis methods to both allow the simplification of detailed mechanisms, and to highlight those regions of particular importance for the phenomena of interest.

In the area of proton exchange membrane fuel cells, the focus is on the CFD modelling and the experimental testing of small scale devices, and the systematic investigation of their performance as a function of operating conditions and the properties of the individual fuel cell components such as electrical conductivity and gas permeability. This is complemented by an experimental and theoretical investigation of novel catalysts, using quantum chemistry methods to predict behaviour, along with catalyst synthesis, physical and electrochemical characterization, and finally testing in real fuel cell systems.

Carbon capture and storage related research is focused on novel operating procedures related to gas turbines linked to solvent capture plants, with the aim of optimizing the overall system performance, and understanding the chemistry of solvent degradation and emissions.

Dr Antonino Sgalambro
A.Sgalambro@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

PhD Supervision

Some PhD projects are currently open for students with scientific interests in the following areas:

  • Optimisation in Logistics, Operations and Supply Chain Management
  • Efficient algorithms for NP-Hard problems in Network and Discrete Optimisation
  • Locational Analysis and Spatial Decision Making
  • Optimisation for Safety, Security and Emergency problems
  • DSS in Humanitarian Logistics and Healthcare Management

For further information on PhD open projects please send a message with your CV to: a.sgalambro@sheffield.ac.uk

Professor Sandor Veres
s.veres@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering

Research interests:

Optimal decision making in autonomous systems, mobile robotics, agent supervised feedback control systems, architectures and programming of reasoning based intelligent agents, formation flying control of robotic vehicles, formal modelling and verification of systems by model checking, fault tolerant control systems, automated processes of data based modelling, robust adaptive control, controller tuning and system identification, satellite dynamics and control, active control of sound and vibration control.

Mr Colin Freeman
c.l.freeman@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

Research interests

My specialisation is atomic scale computational simulation of molecules and material systems and their interfaces.

Particular areas of interest are: Understanding the influence materials and minerals and exert of biological molecules by altering molecular properties and similarly how molecules are able to influence material properties or control the crystallisation of a material; modelling defects and transport properties in functional ceramic materials e.g. perovskites

Dr Jose Curiel Sosa
j.curiel-sosa@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research Fields
Composite Structures and Graphene Nanocomposites
- Prediction damage modelling
- Delamination
- Machining
Aircraft Design
- Numerical/Computational Evaluation
- Aeroelasticity and Load Control
- Structural Integrity
Damage and Fracture Modelling
- Aerostructures
- Impact Engineering
- Wear and contact deterioration

Method.: numerical, modelling, computer aided, computational, analytical

Professor Richard Clayton
r.h.clayton@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Computer Science

Research interests

Computational models of structure and function of human cells, tissues and organs, with an emphasis on:

  • Calibrating models against experimental and clinical data using machine learning.
  • High performance computing and numerical techniques for computationally intensive models.
  • Uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis of detailed multiscale models of the heart.
  • Gaussian process emulation of computationally intensive models.
  • Developing tools to guide intervention and reatment in clinical settings.

See also www.insigneo.org for information about the Insigneo institute for in-silico medicine in Sheffield.

Dr Monica Hernandez
monica.hernandez@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My main research interests lie in microeconometrics, the analysis of micro level data on the economic behaviour of individuals. I am also interested in more general model and methods development to analyse individual level data showing nonstandard characteristics. Recent examples include analysis of health state utility data, health and life satisfaction, the economics of illicit behaviour, the dynamics of children developmental outcomes and applications to individuals’ decisions to participate in welfare programmes.

Dr Paul Richmond
p.richmond@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Computer Science

My current research relates to the acceleration of complex systems simulations using accelerator architectures such as GPUs. More generally my research interests relate to the software engineering challenges of how complex systems can be described using high level or domain specific tools and how automated mapping to parallel and distributed hardware architectures can be achieved. I am particularly interesting in applying agent based techniques to cellular biology, computational neuroscience, pedestrian and transport system as well as working with industry.

Within previous research positions I have worked on developing novel parallel languages and techniques which will allow neuroscientists to run and analyse simulations of up to a billion spiking neurons. In addition to computational neuroscience, I am particularly interested in the use of the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) to accelerate computational simulations. I have previously created the FLAME GPU software framework which allows non GPU specialists to harness the GPUs performance for real time simulation and visualisation. Whilst my background is in high performance parallel computation and computer graphics, I have a general interest in GPU algorithms and in computer graphics techniques for simulation, animation, rendering, serious games, automatic building generation (including aspects of GIS) and a general interest in aerial robotics.

Dr Chengzhi Peng
c.peng@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Architecture

Research on sustainable bioclimatic design with future climate: how performance-based design can contribute to sustainability and livability in future climate? I am currently supervising PhD projects on: (1) Correlating cooling energy use with urban microclimate for estimating future indoor thermal conditions and cooling demands of a city's housing stock; (2) Machine learning methods for modelling morphological links with aspects of urban microclimate; (3) Future climate and change in livability of a city's housing environment.

To date, I have supervised eight successfully completed PhDs. I am particularly interested in supervising  PhD projects to investigate building stock energy modelling for sustainable renovation, livability of a city's housing environment in future climate, and machine learning methods for accelerated environmental simulation of performance-based design.

Dr Marco Conte
m.conte@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemistry

Research Interests

The aim of my research is the identification of structure-activity correlations in heterogeneous catalysis. The understanding of the catalyst structure under the reaction conditions as well as the knowledge of the intermediates generated during the catalytic process are essential factors to design catalysts with enhanced selectivity to the desired products.

To achieve this target an array of spectroscopic tools complemented with molecular modelling are used.

Target reactions are oxidation and halogenation reactions of hydrocarbons over metal oxides and metal nanoparticles in gas and liquid phase.


Dr Tom Stafford
t.stafford@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Psychology

Research interests

Learning and decision making


Professor Thomas Hain
t.hain@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Computer Science

Research interests

Thomas' research interests cover many areas in natural language processing, speech, audio and multimedia technology, machine learning, and complex system optimisation and design.

His interests include: large vocabulary continuous speech recognition, non-linear methods in speech processing, low bit-rate speech coding, machine learning, multi-modal systems, image classification, microphone arrays, system and resource optimisation.

Professor Mark Rainforth
m.rainforth@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

Research interests

Mark's research centres on the high resolution characterisation of microstructures, in particular interfaces and surfaces. His research programmes are broadly based and cover metals, ceramics and coatings:

  • Aberration corrected electron microscopy to determine atomic structure and local bonding state, particularly at interfaces in, for example, nanoscale multilayer coatings or functional ceramics
  • Understanding the dynamic microstructural changes that occur as a result of frictional contact, to thereby develop superior materials, for example, next generation hip arthroplasties
  • Surface degeneration phenomena, such as oxidation of metals (including during hot rolling) and hydrothermal degradation of zirconia ceramics
  • Microstructural evolution during the processing of metals, particularly Ti, Mg and steels, aimed at developing new higher strength materials
  • Designing alloys for resource efficiency
Dr Penny Breeze

Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Penny is currently a research associate in ScHARR within the Health Economics and Decision Modelling Section. Penny has been at ScHARR for over 4 years, first as a PhD student and more recently working as a health economics modeller. Before working in ScHARR Penny was working as a health economics consultant at IMS Health developing cost-effectiveness models for pharmaceutical products. The subject of her thesis was to investigate the use of health economic models to develop drug development programmes for new treatments for systemic lupus erythematosus. Since working at ScHARR Penny has been working on a project funded by the School for Public Health Research (SPHR) to provide a coherent, model based framework for the evaluation of strategies for the prevention of type 2 diabetes. Penny has developed a new cost-effectiveness model to evaluate a broad range of type-2 diabetes prevention interventions in the United Kingdom. Penny's research interests are in methods for longitudinal data analysis for use in decision-analytic modelling. Specifically in complex natural history models with multiple dynamic risk factors.

Mr Andrew Booth
a.booth@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My research interests focus on all methods of systematic review,  evidence synthesis, evidence based practice, and knowledge translation. I am particularly interested in systematic review topics from developing countries, particularly from Sub-Saharan Africa, and in public health topics such as alcohol and HIV/AIDS. I have published with students in topics such as medication adherence, social marketing,  disaster management and evidence based management. My current research students are working in knowledge management in acute hospitals and use of NICE guidance in Social care.  I have been involved in development of a wide range of tools for dissemination, both web based and as online briefings. In 2013 I was one of the first to achieve the University of Sheffield's PhD by Publications with my thesis entitled Acknowledging a Dual Heritage for Qualitative Evidence Synthesis: Harnessing the Qualitative Research and Systematic Review Research Traditions. My most recent interests centre on multiple types of review, including rapid reviews, mapping reviews and scoping reviews.

Professor Siddharth Patwardhan
s.patwardhan@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

Picture

Research in the group undertakes the synthesis of bespoke nanomaterials using biologically inspired green routes.

The group aims to demonstrate potential of green methods for nanomaterials synthesis by realisation of their real-life applications.  Current projects in his group are focussed on developing application of     green nanomaterials in four distinct sectors:   


Technologies allowing scaled-up continuous manufacturing of these novel materials are also being developed.

Focus is on increasing technology readiness level (TRL) for new developments and delivering technologies that are ready for commercialisation.

Dr Bernard Corfe
b.m.corfe@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism
The Medical School

Research Interests

Work in my group primarily examines the relationship between diet, short-chain fatty acid production and metabolism and cell fate (apoptosis and cell cycle). Our work is across a number of scales, from molecualr cell biology of through to human intervention trials with nutrients to prevent or manage disease.

  • Butyrate and cell fate determination
  • Short-chain fatty acid metabolism
  • Crypt cell fate modelling
  • Organ level modelling
  • Diet-Microbiome Interactions, Functional analysis of Probiotics
  • Molecular Biology of keratins
  • Role of vitamin D in IBS / lower gut health
  •  
  • Medical Humanities: patient experience in IBS and IBD

Student performance

Prospective students become part of a supportive and productive research team. We aim to provide a balance between laid-backness and scientific rigourousness that allows students to develop as independent leaders with rounded skillsets. >90% of students have published research in their projects, completed their PhD / MD on time and many of gone on to successful research or academic roles.

Collaborations

We have a multidisciplinary team and collaborate effectively in order to provide wide-ranging projects of exceptional scope and vision. Collaborators include Chemical Engineers, Nutritionists, Computational Modellers, Clinical Gastroenterologists. The majority of students graduate with good interdisciplinary training and experience.

External Activity and benefits to students

Bernard Corfe is a highly networked research leader with membership of mutiple national committees in Nutrition Society, NIHR, British Society for Gastroenterology as well as rtack record of collaboration with industry. This exceptional network capital allows the optimisation of development and career opportunities for members of the team.

 

Miss Suzanne Paisley
s.paisley@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

I joined ScHARR Information Resources at its inception in 1994. In 2000 I was seconded to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE), as a Technical Lead in the Appraisals Team. I returned to ScHARR as Managing Director of the Technology Assessment Reviews (TARs) programme funded UK NHS HTA Programme. In 2003 I was awarded a UK Department of Health fellowship looking at the retrieval and use of evidence in decision-analytic models of cost-effectiveness.

In 2009 I became Head of the ScHARR Information Resources Group (IRG) leading the Group's research and teaching activities and managing the information service for ScHARR staff and students and for NHS staff through the Yorkshire and Humber Research Design Service (RDS).

I am Associate Director of the NICE Public Health Collaborating Centre (PHCC) at ScHARR and of the Department of Health Economic Evaluation Policy Research Unit (EEPRU) based at ScHARR and the University of York

Research Interests

Information retrieval methods and problem structuring methods to support evidence synthesis. Specific areas of interest:

  • Use of evidence in the specification and population of decision-analytic models
  • Retrieval of evidence for reviews of complex interventions

Teaching Interests

  • MSc in Health Economics and Decision Modelling (HEDM) (Research Methods unit, Joint Lead)
  • MSc in International Health Technology Assessment, Pricing and Reimbursement (iHRAPR) (proposed) (Use of Evidence in the Design and Development of Models unit, Lead)

Professional Activities

Member of:

  • Health Technology Assessment International (HTAi) Information Resources Group
  • InterTASC Information Specialists' Subgroup (ISSG)
  • Cochrane Information Retrieval Methods Group (IRMG)
  • Campbell and Cochrane Economics Methods Group (CCEMG)

Current Projects

  • Department of Health Economic Evaluation Policy Research Unit (DH EEPRU).
    Co-investigator (PI: John Brazier). Department of Health (2010-2015)
  • NICE Public Health Collaborating Centre.
    Joint PI (with Ron Akehurst, Jim Chilcott, Liddy Goyder). NICE (2008-2011, 2011-2012)
  • Angioplasty for peripheral arterial occulsive disease (PAOD): systematic review.
    Co-applicant (PI: Jonathon Michaels). NIHR HTA (2010-2011)
Professor Mohammed Pourkashanian
M.Pourkashanian@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Professor Pourkashanian is the Head of University Energy Research at the University of Sheffield and Director of the Pilot-scale Advanced Capture Technology (PACT) national facilities. He is a Professor of Energy Engineering and has completed numerous major research projects on clean energy technology and has received a substantial sum of grants from RCUK-EPSRC, EU, NATO, and industry. He has published over 446 refereed research papers and has co-authored books on coal combustion. He played a leading role in developing the NOx post-processing computer codes and subsequently soot/NOx models that were later employed in the commercial CFD software. He is a member of numerous international and national scientific bodies including a member of EERA Implementation Plan 2013-2015 (contribution to CCS-EII Team, SET-PLAN), a member of Coordinating Group of UKCCSRC, an invited member of the All Party Parliamentary Renewable Transport Fuels Group, member of technical working group for the Department of Energy & Climate Change (CCS Roadmap UK2050) and Expert-Member in EU-GCC Clean Gas Energy Network.

Professor Meihong Wang
meihong.wang@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

Expertise:

Research areas:   Process and Energy Systems Engineering

Technical tools:    Process Modeling/Simulation, Control and Optimization (with new efforts in Molecular simulation)

Application areas:   Power Plants, CO2 Capture, CO2 Transport, CO2 Utilisation, Energy Storage, Bio-Energy

 

Research Funding and Projects:

Since 2007, I am involved in projects worth around £12.9 million [7 grants as PIs (worth £2.1 million) and 10 grants as CIs (worth £10.8 million)], with net research funding around £2,597 k spent by my own group.

I am leading one UK EPSRC funded Consortium project on intensified carbon capture worth £1.27 million with 10 investigators and 5 PDRFs from 4 universities from Oct. 2014 to Mar. 2018.

I am Project Coordinator of EU IRSES project, leading 6 EU/China partners (with 40 research staff) from Jan. 2014 to Dec. 2017 using process systems engineering techniques for power plants and CCS.

 

Impact

One journal paper (Lazic et al., 2013) is awarded SAGE Best Paper Prize 2014 (http://hulluniscience.com/2015/05/20/chemical-engineering-professor-receives-sage-best-paper-award/) & also Ludwig Mond Prize 2014 by IMechE to recognize our contributions to process industry (http://hulluniscience.com/2015/08/21/humber-co2-transport-pipeline-network-design-wins-top-award/)

Another journal paper (Wang et al. 2011) is the most cited paper in Chem. Eng. Res. and Des. since 2010 (http://www.journals.elsevier.com/chemical-engineering-research-and-design/most-cited-articles/).

In collaboration with RWE npower, Alstom Power, BF2RA, COSTAIN, National Grid, PSE Ltd, Carbon Clean Solutions (CCS) Ltd, E.ON UK and Solutia UK for research.

Professor Andrea Genovese
a.genovese@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

  • Facility Location Problems: models, methods, applications
  • Applications of Spatial Interaction theory
  • Multi-Criteria Decision Making problems
  • Decision Support Models for Logistics Problems
  • Green logistics and low carbon innovation for Supply Chains
Dr Munira Essat
m.essat@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

      • Systematic review of evidence for clinical effectiveness in healthcare

 

      • Health policy and decision making

 

      • Systematic review methodology
Professor Matt Stevenson
m.d.stevenson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Research interests
  • My research interests are discrete event simulation, individual patient modelling and mathematical modelling
Miss Bobby Nisha Syed Mohamed
b.nisha@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Urban Studies and Planning

Research interests

My current research is focussed on Evidence-based decision-making (EBDM) in urban design for regeneration. I am interested in the principles of evidence-informed analysis and decision making in design decision-making and looking to develop a process framework that incorporates tools and techniques of spatial analysis and review, to collate evidence, which then informs design decisions.

I also have a strong interest in design pedagogy for teaching and learning in studio based learning environments, and particularly the use of Virtual Reality/Augment Reality to support the development of design knowledge and skills.

Dr Annette Taylor
a.f.taylor@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
  • Biotechnology and biosystems
  • Catalysis and biocatalysis
  • Modelling
  • Reaction Engineering
  • Sustainability
Dr Gary Verth
g.verth@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

Mathematical modelling of plasma processes, e.g., with application to the Sun's atmosphere.

Dr Pablo Castillo Ortiz
P.Castillo-Ortiz@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Law

Research Interests

  • Comparative constitutional law and politics, with a focus on constitutional jurisdictions
  • Theories and models of judicial decision-making
  • European legal/judicial integration
  • Configurational analysis
  • Historic Memory

Areas of Research Supervision

  • Comparative constitutional law and politics
  • Spanish constitutional law and politics
  • Comparative constitutional jurisdictions
  • Theories of judicial decision-making
  • European legal/judicial integration
Dr Roderich Gross
r.gross@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering
Research interests:
  • robotics (swarm robotics, multi-robot systems, modular reconfigurable robots, autonomous robots)
  • self-organized systems (self-assembly, self-replication)
  • machine learning & natural computing (Turing Learning, swarm intelligence, evolutionary algorithms, artificial life)
  • mathematical biology (decision making)
Dr Ruth Little
ruth.little@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Geography

Her main focus has been increasing understanding of the human factors that influence the management of disease in livestock - analysing how and why livestock farmers make their decisions, and how this affects disease control – and piloting innovative approaches to increase involvement of stakeholders and the wider public in decision-making on Animal Health and Welfare Policy.

Dr Jonathan Black
j.a.black@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

Research interests

Dr Black has a wide research interests in the areas of:

  • Physical modelling of geotechnical problems
  • Transparent soils and non-intrusive physical modelling
  • Foundation engineering
  • Soft ground remediation
  • Soil structure interaction
  • Partical Image Velocimetry (PIV) in physical modelling
  • Development of advance testing systems


Dr Rachel Smith
rachel.smith@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Research interests
  • Wet granulation design and scale-up
  • DEM/CFD modelling of particulate processes
  • Drug delivery methods
  • Biological and water systems modelling
Dr Antonio Griffo
a.griffo@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering

Research interests

  • Modelling and stability analysis of AC and hybrid AC/DC power systems
  • Power electronics and systems for vehicular applications
  • More electric aircraft technologies
  • Control of electric drives
  • Sensorless control of permanent magnet brushless dc and ac drives
  • Thermal modelling of permanent magnet machines
  • Fault modelling and detection in permanent magnet machines
  • Real time modelling and hardware in the loop testing methodologies


Dr Henriette Jensen
h.s.jensen@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

Research interests

  • Sewer process modelling
  • Hydrogen sulphide induced corrosion
  • Microbial ecology in urban water systems
  • Synthetic biology
  • Odour problems


Dr Jose Pozo Soler
j.pozo@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering

Research interests:

 

  • Statistical shape modelling
  • Non-rigid image registration
  • Medical image computing
  • Musculoskeletal image analysis
Professor Richard Wilkinson
r.d.wilkinson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

Uncertainty quantification, Monte Carlo (especially Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) methods), applied statistical modelling, climate science.

Ms Fiona Campbell
f.campbell@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My research interests are:

  • Use of evidence to support decision making
  • Incorporating non-RCT evidence in systematic reviews
  • Assessment of patient reported outcomines in clinical trials and methods of synthesis
  • Methods of synthesising qualitative and quantitative reviews
  • Use of expert opinion in systematic reviews
  • Any issues relating to improving health in low and middle income countries
Dr Nicola Dempsey
N.Dempsey@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Landscape Architecture

Research interests

  • Place-keeping and post-occupancy evaluation of open space to examine how effectively landscapes are used in the way designers intended;
  • Decision-making in open space management and maintenance to explore who makes the decisions and on whose behalf;
  • Developing an understanding of quality in the landscape, particularly in different contexts such as India’s rapidly growing cities;
  • Measuring perceptions of the neighbourhood via mapping according to different social/ demographic characteristics.


Dr Holly Lawford-Smith
h.lawford-smith@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Philosophy

Research interests

Holly is interested in collective action problems and coordination problems; collective beliefs, desires, intentions, actions, motivations, excuses, obligation, responsibility, and punishment;  political decision-making and practical reasoning; the status of states, armies, and corporations as agents; climate change and climate ethics; bottom-up social change and individuals' political duties; human psychological and cultural malleability in relation to political reform.

Dr Martina McGuinness
m.mcguinness@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

My research focuses upon two broad, but overlapping areas, namely business risk and small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs). More particularly, these can be broken down into distinct research strands: the influence of corruption upon organisational strategic decision-making in multinational enterprises; organisational preparedness and business continuity practice; strategy practice in SMEs.

I am interested in supervising PhD students in the following areas:

  • organisational risk and resilience
  • business continuity management
  • flood risk management
  • corruption


Dr Konstantinos Mouratidis
k.mouratidis@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Economics

Research interests

My research focuses on two areas: Economic forecasting and Monetary Economics. In the area of economic forecasting, I evaluate the forecast performance of forecasters using survey data. Alternatively, in the area of monetary economic, I analyze monetary policy preferences and the policy decision of central banks. I would be interested in supervising PhD students in these areas.

Dr Matthew Rablen


Department of Economics

Matthew's research is in public economics and behavioural economics. He focuses on four inter-related areas: understanding the determinants of tax compliance, the link between economic quantities and subjective happiness, explaining decision-making under risk with models of behavioural economics, and designing voting systems for international institutions. Currently he is exploring the role of social networks on compliance behaviour, the role of relative income in the utility function, and the reform of the UN Security Council.

Matthew supervises PhD students interested in microeconomic theory and behavioural economics.

Professor Susan White
sue.white@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Sue's primary research interest is in the sociological analysis of professional judgement and decision-making with an emphasis on understanding how science, formal knowledge, rhetoric, moral judgement, emotion and subjectivity interact in professional practice, particularly in child health and welfare. Her research has focused principally on the analysis of professional talk in a range of health and welfare settings. However, she has also undertaken evaluative and applied research for central and local government, NHS and non-statutory organisations.

Professor Robert Freckleton
r.freckleton@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Animal and Plant Sciences

Research interests:

My research focuses on modelling population and community dynamics. I am particularly interested in large scale population dynamics, although have a range of interests, including:

  • Plant population ecology, modelling plant populations, modelling weed populations.
  • Evolutionary ecology, phylogenetic comparative methodology and its application to ecological problems.
  • Theoretical ecology, statistical methodology
Dr Georges Kesserwani
g.kesserwani@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

Research interests

Dr Kesserwani current research interests revolve around:

  • Hybrid mesh-based/mesh-less numerical methods for solving conservations laws
  • Integrated river flow modelling on mobile bed with sediment transport and vegetation
  • Multi-layer coastal flow modelling with application to tsunamis
  • Integrated hydrological and flood modelling at multiple scales
  • High-performance computing and Multi-Agent-based systems


Professor Jane Seymour
jane.seymour@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Nursing and Midwifery
Health Sciences School

I am a nurse by background and have worked in palliative and end-of-life care research and education since the early 1990s. My own PhD was a study of end of life decision-making in intensive care units. I have long standing interests in the palliative care needs of frail older people and how we can meet them, at a clinical level and health systems level. I also have interests in advance care planning, other aspects of end of life decision-making and public education in palliative and end of life care. I have publised and presented widely on these topics. I have research links in Europe and beyond.

I have supervised and examined PhD students from the UK and overseas (including Malawi, Uganda, Cameroon, India and the Middle East). I encourage students to undertake projects related to palliative care that fit with their own interests and prepares them to be leaders in palliative care nursing research in their own countries/ contexts.

My methodological expertise lies in qualitative and mixed methods research, with special interests in case study and ethnographic methods.

Professor Eckart Lange
e.lange@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Landscape Architecture

Research interests

My research focuses on how landscape architecture and environmental planning can influence and direct anthropogenic landscape change, while developing innovative methodologies of how advanced virtual landscape visualisations and modeling can be used to explore human reaction to these changes. My work spans a range of scales and issues including environmental impact assessments, urban green space strategies, rural landscape development, large-scale landscape planning and design, landscape aesthetics, planning and design communication as well as participatory decision-making.

Dr Sean Anderson
s.anderson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering
Research interests:
  • Identification of continuous- and discrete-time dynamic systems
  • Nonlinear systems modelling
  • Adaptive and optimal control in biological systems
  • Neurorobotics
  • Oculomotor plant dynamics
  • Cerebellar function
Professor Patricia Cowell
p.e.cowell@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Human Communication Sciences
Health Sciences School

Research interests

  • Ovarian hormone effects on speech, language and cognition
  • Cerebral asymmetries and interhemispheric relationships
  • Sex differences in cortical development and aging
  • Modelling mechanisms of neurocognitive plasticity
Professor Patricia Cowell
p.e.cowell@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Human Communication Sciences (old code)
Research interests
  • Ovarian hormone effects on speech, language and cognition
  • Cerebral asymmetries and interhemispheric relationships
  • Sex differences in cortical development and aging
  • Modelling mechanisms of neurocognitive plasticity
Dr Daniel Gladwin
d.gladwin@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering

Research interests

  • Control – power systems
  • Power electronics
  • Embedded systems
  • Energy storage and management
  • Intelligent systems
  • Telematics
  • Optimisation and Modelling
  • Evolutionary computing


Dr Ann Rowan
a.rowan@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Geography

The response of mountain catchments to climatic change
Geomorphology and dynamics of debris-covered glaciers
Uncertainties associated with glacier–climate modelling
Quaternary dating techniques (e.g. optically stimulated luminescence)

Professor Aki Tsuchiya
a.tsuchiya@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Economics
School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

  • measuring, valuing, and modelling health, and other aspects of well-being
  • incorporating equity concerns into social welfare functions
  • normative economics of health and beyond


Mr Tsung-Hsien Wang
Tsung-hsien.Wang@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Architecture

Performance-driven design process, parametric modelling, geometry construction and optimisation, cloud-based computing for interactive/real-time building information visualisation, building information interoperation, automated sustainable evaluation.

Dr Guang-Jin Li
g.li@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering

Research interests

  • Novel permanent magnet machines including single and hybrid excited switched flux permanent magnet machines
  • Design of novel switched reluctance machines and their drives including direct torque control and hybrid current control
  • Fault tolerance, fault modelling and diagnostics (inter-turn and phase shirt-circuit) of permanent magnet machines
  • Thermal modelling of electrical machines
  • Renewable energy and low emission transportation including wind power, electrical/hybrid vehicles, more electrical aircraft


Dr Milijana Odavic
M.Odavic@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering

Research interests

  • Power electronics for enhanced power quality
  • Advanced control of power electronic systems
  • Modulation strategies for power electronics converters
  • Mathematical modelling of PWM harmonic spectra
  • Multisampling
  • Multilevel power electronics convertors
  • Micro-grids
  • Power system stability
  • Modelling of uncertain systems and robust stability
  • Diagnostics and prognostics for drive systems
  • More Electric Aircraft


Professor David Fletcher
d.i.fletcher@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

Dr Fletcher's research interests are in solid mechanics, engineering design and in performance of materials. A large proportion of his work has application in the railway sector, and combines experimental and modelling approaches. Major themes include:

  • Railway rail-wheel interface understanding & improvement (contact mechanics, adhesion, wear, fatigue crack growth, application of new materials, thermal damage. Input to traction control systems to maximise performance without infrastructure damage)
  • Rail overhead line modelling and experimental investigation from a mechanical perspective (wear, fatigue crack growth, materials choices)
  • Application of fracture mechanics and boundary element modelling to crack growth prevention/understanding
  • Tribology (lubrication, wear)
  • Modelling to optimise rail network traffic for reduced energy use, optimisation of energy storage, and greater network resilience (the algorithms and technology behind Driver Advisory Systems)
  • Railway system security: modelling blast from energetic materials, and the response of surrounding environment, e.g. railway station and vehicles (fluid structure interactions)
  • Rail system design for safety and security (environmental resilience, behaviour of materials under rapid and extreme loadings)
Dr Chantal Cantarelli
c.c.cantarelli@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research

Chantal’s research interests are in improving the success of megaprojects using theories in front-end planning, decision-making, risk management, and organisational behaviour. Her research focuses particularly on the influence of project ownership and financing on project performance. Furthermore, Chantal’s research interests are in studying the phenomenon of escalation of commitment in the decision-making of projects as an explanation for project failure. Other research interests include public-private partnerships, public sector efficiency and effectiveness.

Chantal is a member of the Logistics and Supply Chain Management (LSCM) Research Centre and the Advanced Resource Efficiency Centre (AREC) at the University of Sheffield.

PhD Supervision

 

Chantal is interested in supervising doctoral students in the field of operations management and project management. She is keen to supervise students who have an interest in quantitative or qualitative methods in research related to major programmes.

 

 

Publications

Cantarelli, C., Chorus, C.G. and Cunningham, S.W. (2013). Explaining cost overruns of large-scale transportation infrastructure projects using a signaling game. Transport Science, 9(3) 239-258.

Cantarelli, C., Flyvbjerg, B. and Buhl, S.L. (2012). Geographical variation in project cost performance. The Netherlands versus worldwide. Journal of Transport Geography, 24 324-331.

Cantarelli, C., Molin, E.J.E., van Wee, B. and Flyvbjerg, B. (2012). Characteristics of cost overruns for Dutch transport infrastructure projects and the importance of the decision to build and project phases. Transport Policy, 22 49-56.

Cantarelli, C., van Wee, B., Molin, E.J.E. and Flyvbjerg, B. (2012). Different cost performance: different determinants? The case of cost overruns in Dutch transport infrastructure projects. Transport Policy, 22 88-95.

Cantarelli, C., Flyvbjerg, B., van Wee, B. and Molin. E.J.E. (2010). Lock-in and its influence on the project performance of large-scale transportation infrastructure projects: investigating the way in which lock-in can emerge and affect cost overruns. Environment and Planning B: Planning & Design, 37(5) 792-807.

Chantal C. Cantarelli, Bent Flyvbjerg, Eric J.E. Molin and Bert van Wee (2010). Cost overruns in large-scale transportation infrastructure projects: explanations and their theoretical embeddedness. European Journal of Transport and Infrastructure Research, 10(1) 5-18.

Dr John Brierley
J.A.Brierley@Sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interest

His research interest is in the area of product costing. In relation to product costing, he is interested in supervising students in areas like the factors influencing the adoption of activity-based costing (ABC), the factors influencing cost system sophistication/complexity, the effects of ABC and cost system sophisitcation on performance outcomes, like satisfaction with the cost system, the usefulness of cost information in cost management and decision making, and overall financial performance.

In relation to research impact, he has carried out research into the calculation of denominators of overhead rates. Although the majority of companies calculate the denominator using the budgeted capacity, this may not be the most appropriate denominator capacity to use. Details of the research and the alternative methods available can be found athttp://cmawebline.org/joomla4/images/stories/JAMAR%202006%20Summer/JAMAR-v4-2-Reasons%20for%20Adopting.

Professor Lorraine Maltby
l.maltby@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Animal and Plant Sciences

Research interests:

The human global population is predicted to reach 9 billion by 2050 and managing landscapes to provide the food, water, fuel, housing and other resources required by this growing population, whilst protecting the ecosystems that provide them, is a major challenge. My research addresses this challenge and is concerned with understanding the impact of anthropogenic activities on freshwater ecosystems and their catchments. A major research aim is to gain a mechanistic understanding of key ecosystem services and the ecological processes that underpin them, and to investigate how they are affected by anthropogenic inputs and activities. The output from this research is used to inform environmental decision making and to influence policy development and implementation. Current research topics include:

  • Ecological risk assessment of chemicals
  • Chemical risk and climate change
  • Ecosystem services and environmental stressors
  • Agriculture, biodiversity and ecosystem services
  • Environmental plastics
  • Spatial variation in vulnerability to chemical risk
Dr Pirashanthie Vivekananda-Schmidt
p.vivekananda-schmidt@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Academic Unit of Medical Education
The Medical School

My research broadly fits into understanding factors that influences student performance and in Professional development, including professionalism, moral and ethical aspects of practice, and inter-professional working. I am interested in and have an established track record in improving students’ learning experience through, Technology Enhanced Learning.  Through my publications I have contributed to the learning of ethics in healthcare, developing ethical reasoning, professionalism and safe practice.

My current work and recent publications attempt to answer questions of why there maybe disparities in academic performance between different student sub groups, better understanding ethical issues during decision making and patient management, and how technology can help us to improve student experience. 

Dr Antonio de la Vega de Leon
a.vega@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Information School

Research interests

Computational techniques to support decision making are becoming more prevalent in chemical and pharmacological research. I am interested in different aspects of how these techniques can contribute to drug discovery research:

  • Machine learning model interpretation: machine learning models create associations between structural elements of sets of molecules and biochemical properties that are expensive to measure. However, in many cases it is not possible to know what these associations are. I am interested in techniques that are able to make these models more understandable.
  • Visualization of chemical space: visualization techniques are a useful way to condense a large amount of information in an understandable fashion. I am interested in developing novel visualizations that bridge the structural information of sets of molecules to their physico-chemical and biochemical properties.
Professor Kypros Pilakoutas
k.pilakoutas@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

Research interests

Prof Pilakoutas' research is in the fields of:

  • Structural Concrete
    Shear, Punching shear, Ductility, Deflections, Crack Width, Nunerical Modelling
     
  • FRP
    All aspects of behaviour of Internal and Externally Bonded Reinforcement, including Durability and Nunerical Modelling
     
  • Fibre Reinforcements
    Steel, PP, Glass and all recycled fibres. All aspects of behaviour of cast, sprayed or roller compacted FRC and Nunerical Modelling
     
  • Construction Innovation
    Novel types of Reinforcement and Strengthening, Couplers, Terminators, Cold Formed sections, Composite sections, 3-Printing, Recycled Aggregates, Recycled Fillers, Recycled Natural Materials, Rubberised Concrete, Structures made of ice, Coastal Concrete Structures, Functional Origami Structures
     
  • Earthquake Engineering
    All aspects of behaviour of Reinforced Concrete Structures including Shear Walled Structures, Repair and Strengthening using FRP and Post Tensioned Metal Straps (PTMS), Seismic Risk Assessment and Management, Vulnerability Assessment, Novel Energy Dissipation Structural Elements

 

Mr Peter Bibby
p.r.bibby@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Urban Studies and Planning

Research interests

I have extensive experience in applied ecoonmic and social research in relation to UK public policies. I have a particular interest in the application of GIS and natural language processing to strategic policy issues with specific expertise in spatial analysis and modelling techniques. 

Dr Sam Clarke
sam.clarke@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

Research interests

His main research interests focus on:

  • The role of soil in explosive events
  • Numerical modelling of geotechnical problems
  • Development of advanced constitutive models for soils
  • Soil reinforcement and remediation techniques
  • Quantification of rate effects is soils
Dr Ali Gooya
a.gooya@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering
  • Statistical and variational medical image computing
  • Group-wise analysis of high-dimensional biological patterns
  • Probabilistic generative/discriminative modelling
  • Bayesian inference
  • Graphical models
  • Machine Learning for Medical Imaging
  • Pattern Recognition for Population Imaging

 

Dr Yi Li
YiLi@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

Dr. Yi Li's main research interests are in the field of fluid mechanics, in particular turbulence. Topics include fluid flow optimization, simulation and modelling, and the application of signal processing and database techniques in the study of data-intensive fluid mechanics problems.

Dr Alma Schellart
a.schellart@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

Research interests

  • Uncertainty in sewer sediment transport
  • Uncertainty in integrated water quality modelling and the use of rainfall radar data
  • Urban rainfall and energy balance in the urban water cycle and heat recovery from urban drainage systems.
Dr Andrew Sole
A.Sole@Sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Geography

Research interests

Andrew's research is focused on furthering our understanding of the mass balance and dynamic stability of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) in a changing climate through the use of numerical modelling, satellite and airborne remote sensing and fieldwork.

Dr Paul Watton
p.watton@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Computer Science

Research interests

Mathematical and computational biomechanics and mechanobiology; constitutive modelling of soft biological tissues; theoretical and computational analyses of growth and remodeling; cardiovascular mechanics; arterial mechanics, biofluid mechanics, continuum mechanics, vascular mechanobiology, aneurysms.

Professor Tanya Whitfield
t.whitfield@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Biomedical Science

Research Interests

My group uses the zebrafish as a model organism to study the development of the inner ear in the embryo and the genetic causes of deafness. We are interested in early patterning and evolution of otic structures, disease modelling and fluid regulation in the ear.

Read more (link to the Centre for Developmental and Biomedical Genetics)

Professor William Zimmerman
w.zimmerman@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Research interests
  • Energy efficient generation of microbubbles and their applications (particularly biofuels and bioreactors)
  • Plasma microreactors, especially low power consumption generation of ozone
  • Fluid dynamics of helical turbulence and mixing
  • Thin film dynamics and microrheometry
  • Computational modelling with inverse methods
Dr Viktor Fedun
v.fedun@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering

Research interests:

My research is primarily concerned with the mathematical modelling of physics of

  • solar/space plasmas;
  • sun-solar wind;
  • solar-terrestrial systems.

The study of processes occurring in such systems is crucially important for understanding the Sun, predicting Space Weather and understanding the dynamics of laboratory and technological plasmas. This includes mathematical modelling of solar magnetic flux tubes and processes that heat and maintain the coronal plasma at multi-million degree temperatures; studying fundamental plasma processes such as waves and instabilities in inhomogeneous media; determining the physical parameters of solar magnetic structures.

Dr Hui Long
h.long@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

Dr Hui Long specialises in mechanics of materials, contact mechanics, structure integrity, structure dynamics, and Finite Element Analysis. Her current research of applications is centred on two broad areas, wind energy and metal forming technology.

In wind energy, the current research areas include:
-       Reliability & damage analysis of gears & bearings;
-       Drivetrain dynamic and transient load modelling;
-       Failure analysis using field recorded SCADA data.

In metal forming, the current research areas include:
−       Metal spinning process formability;
−       Incremental sheet forming for hard-to-deform metals;
−       Non-linear finite element analysis and modelling.


Dr Robert Pryce
r.e.pryce@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

I am broadly interested in all areas of economics of health, but especially the economics of "sin" behaviours such as alcohol, tobacco, drugs and gambling. I am also interested in the economics of food. I am currently involved in several different topics within the Sheffield Alcohol Research Group including work on alcohol dependence, local alcohol consumption estimates, joint modelling of tobacco and alcohol demand, and modelling of price policies.

 

I am also more generally interested in wellbeing work, especially work combining this with "sin" behaviours. Previous work includes looking at the monetary cost of problem gambling on wellbeing. I have also supervised an MSc dissertation looking at smoking and wellbeing.

Professor Neil Sims
n.sims@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

Smart fluids

• Modelling and design of smart fluid dampers
• Control and stability of smart fluid dampers
• Commercialisation of smart fluid dampers for consumer and industrial applications
• Research projects include the ADLAND project

Machining vibration:

• Methods for predicting and preventing chatter in high speed machining
• Active and passive vibration control during machining
• Research projects include the EPSRC research grants on chatter avoidance, and process damping

Uncertainty propagation:

• The role of uncertainty in structural dynamics problems
• Propagation techniques
• Application to smart materials and machining problems
• Application to modelling and design of energy harvesting systems
• Research funded by the EPSRC platform grant on Uncertainty Propagation in Structures, Systems and Processes

Dr Erica Ballantyne
e.e.ballantyne@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research

 

Erica is a member of the Logistics and Supply Chain Management (LSCM) Research Centre, and the Centre for Energy, Environment and Sustainability (CEES), and the Advanced Resource Efficiency Centre (AREC) here at the University of Sheffield.

Research interests include: Sustainable urban freight transport and logistics operations; city logistics; sustainable urban supply chains; and local authority freight transport planning and policy decision making. She welcomes exploring future collaborations with industry partners and research academics.

Prospective PhD candidates

Erica is interested in supervising doctoral students in the field of logistics, freight transport and supply chain management. In particular, she is keen to supervise students who have an interest in using qualitative methods in logistics related research. Prospective PhD students with related research interests are invited to send a research proposal and a CV for consideration.

Publications

Ballantyne, E.E.F., Lindholm, M. and Whiteing, A.W. (2013). A comparative study of urban freight transport planning: addressing stakeholder needs. Journal of Transport Geography, 32 93- 101.

Ballantyne, E.E.F. and Boodoo, A. (2010). Freight in an Eco-town: How does freight fit into eco-town planning? Logistics and Transport Focus, 12(6) 28-32.

Full list of publications

Dr Yu Chen
yu.chen@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of East Asian Studies

Research interests

Dr Chen’s research interests are in China’s urbanisation and rural-to-urban migration. China is experiencing the largest migration wave in human history, with hundreds of millions of people moving from the countryside to cities to seek better life. She is interested in the social, economic, spatial and environmental consequences of such massive urbanisation.

She is currently working on the following projects:

ESRC/CASS Urban Transformations: Urban Development, Migration, Segregation and Inequality (2015--2018). This project aims to bring together researchers from the University of Glasgow, University of Sheffield and the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, to develop new ideas, innovative methods and analysis on the impacts of migration on urban development, the related social-spatial segregation and public policy challenges.

ESRC/GCRF: Dynamics of Health & Environmental Inequalities in Hebei Province, China (2017–2018). This project aims to develop the data infrastructure and to examine the social and health impacts of rapid urbanisation and air pollution, in order to improve decision support tools for economic and social policy.

She is also interested in rural-to-urban migrants and their life prospects. Her previous projects examined the aspirations and socio-economic integration of new-generation migrants in urban China.

She welcomes applications from prospective PhD students in the fields of urbanisation, migration, urban development and housing.

Professor Clive Norris
c.norris@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Research interests

For the last decade my research has involved documenting and analysing the increased use of surveillance in contemporary society. In particular it has focused on the police use of informants, CCTV surveillance, and surveillance in criminal justice system. I have also played a central role in establishing Surveillance Studies as a specialist field of knowledge by building the infrastructure to create a viable sub-discipline. This has informed my work in setting up: a journal - Surveillance and Society; creating an academic community of scholars the through the Surveillance Studies Network; hosting a biennial conference (held in Sheffield 2004, 2006, 2008); being awarded (with others) an ESRC seminar series, and participating in range of international collaborations, UrbanEye, 2001-2004, Technical University of Berlin); For Whom the Bell Curves, 2005-9, (University of Trondheim); The New Transparency 2008-14) (Kingston University, Ontario), Living in Surveillance Societies (COST – University of Edinburgh 2009 – 2013).

I particularly welcome applications from students in the specialist areas listed below although I have broad interests in the sociology of deviance and social control and comparative criminology.

  • The sociology of policing
  • The police use of informers
  • The impact and effectiveness of CCTV surveillance
  • Surveillance in the workplace
  • The sociology of the new surveillance technologies (DNA, Drug and Alcohol Testing)
  • The experience of surveillance
  • The media representation of surveillance
  • Decision making in the criminal justice system


Dr Robert Barthorpe
r.j.barthorpe@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

Dr Barthorpe's research covers a range of problems in the field of structural dynamics and beyond, with an underlying theme being the integration of numerical modelling and experimental data. Structural health monitoring is one of his major research themes. The broad aim of an SHM system is to be able to identify, at an early stage, occurrences of damage that may ultimately lead to the failure of the component or system being monitored.

Established approaches to this task typically fall into one of two categories: they are either based entirely on experimental data, or make use of a numerical model that is periodically updated as new data becomes available. Both of these approaches have distinct drawbacks: for the former, lack of appropriate experimental data is the major issue; for the latter, model-form uncertainty is among the challenges faced.

Part of Rob's work is in investigating ways to circumvent the lack of data problem through novel experimental and data-modelling techniques. A larger part is in developing new methods for integrating experimental and numerical methods, such that uncertainty in both the experimental measurements and the numerical model may be accounted for.

These methods are being developed for application to aerospace structures, wind turbines and civil infrastructure. However, the domain of applicability is much broader as the issues of handling uncertainty, solving inverse problems and overcoming test-model discrepancy are pervasive in many branches of science and engineering. Applications being investigated include the energy performance of buildings and the modelling of human bones.

Dr Inna Gitman
i.gitman@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

My main research interests are the modelling of solid and bio-materials. My work is mostly computational. The three main themes are Mechanics of Materials, Bio-Mechanics and Statistical & Stochastic Analysis.

Mechanics of Materials:

  • Analysis of the materials behaviour within a multi-scale modelling framework using the homogenisation of Representative Volume Elements (in collaboration with Prof. Bert Sluys of Delft University of Technology, Netherlands, and Prof. Harm Askes of the University of Sheffield).
  • Analysis and implementation of gradient-enriched continuum theories that can be used to capture a range of microstructure-driven phenomena such as wave dispersion, size effects and strain localisation (in collaboration with Prof. Elias Aifantis of Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, Prof. Harm Askes, and Dr Terry Bennett of the University of Sheffield).

Bio-Mechanics

  • Analysis of the behaviour of the bone subjected to osteoporosis (in collaboration with Prof. Tim Skerry, Dr Eugene McCloskey and Dr Lang Yang).
  • Modelling of bone as anisotropic continua (in collaboration with Prof. Harm Askes of the University of Sheffield, Dr Ellen Kuhl of the Stanford University, USA and Prof. Elias Aifantis of Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece).

Statistical & Stochastic analysis

  • Statistical analysis and stochastic characterisation of saturated soil (in collaboration with Prof. Michael A. Hicks of Delft University of Technology, Netherlands).
  • Stochastic stability analysis (in collaboration with Prof. Mikhail B. Gitman of Perm State Technical University).
Dr Richard Thackray
r.thackray@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

Research interests

Sustainable steelmaking
Research is focussed on identifying strategies to produce more energy efficient steelmaking processes and to improve material efficiency. We work with industrial partners such as Siemens to investigate sustainable plate manufacture, and with Tata Steel to conduct research in areas as diverse as alternative materials for ironmaking, dephosphorisation mechanisms in oxygen steelmaking, the effect of reduced niobium content on microstructure of pipeline grades, life cycle analysis and substance flow analysis of critical elements used in steelmaking, use of alternative waste streams in primary steel production, and improved reuse and recycling of by-products.

Secondary steelmaking and continuous casting
Research is centred on understanding the effect of thermomechanical processing on inclusion formation and behaviour as well as developing new methodologies for characterising inclusions. Casting research focuses on understanding the role of mould powders on the both the internal and surface quality of cast products, particularly casting of next generation (TRIP, DP) steels.

Other
Other areas of active research include modelling and design of castings for the nuclear supply chain in partnership with Sheffield Forgemasters, modelling of the behaviour of steel in fire, and the development of new modelling methodologies for predicting microstructure and segregation in continuously cast steels.

Professor Joseph Boxall
j.b.boxall@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

Research interests

Prof. Boxall´s research interests are concerned with understanding and modelling hydraulic, water quality and infrastructure performance throughout the natural and urban environment. His research interests are multi-disciplinary and have a number of cross cutting themes that include research in full-scale live systems, pilot and laboratory systems, with the application of theoretical, computational and analytical approaches, including software development. Specific themes include:

  • The monitoring, modelling, operation and management of potable water distribution systems for both quantity, with an emphasis on leakage, and quality encompassing physical, biological and chemical changes and interactions
  • The dynamics and impacts of pollutants in open channel systems
  • The hydraulic and pollution performance of urban drainage systems
  • Application of ICT for data collection from disparate urban water systems, together with computation (soft computing) techniques to turn data to information to knowledge
  • Asset management and whole life costs, including energy and carbon, associated with water distribution and sewer systems
Professor Lin Ma
lin.ma@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Lin’s research is in the field of future clean and sustainable energy technologies with a focus on multi-scale process computational and CFD modelling. His active research areas include

  • Carbon capture and storage from power generation processes, 
  • Clean coal/biomass combustion for power generation and pollutants formation prediction,
  • Fuel related ash deposition, slagging and fouling in power plant furnaces, 
  • Future power plant multi-scale, dynamic and virtual reality simulation, 
  • Wind turbine and wind farm aerodynamics,
  • LES (Large Eddy Simulation) of atmospheric boundary layer flow for wind energy applications,
  • Wind resources prediction for built environments,
  • Fuel cells and anaerobic digestion processes modelling.
Dr Franck Nicolleau
f.nicolleau@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

Franck is involved in developing kinematic simulation as an alternative method for CFD. The work involves the prediction of oarticle dispersion with nertia in a gravity field and dispersion in atmospheric and stratified flows with rotation. This analysis is vital for the prediction of pollutant dispersion in, for example, atmospheric weather conditions.

Good numerical modelling is always backed up by experimentation. Franck's group is developing a series of basic experiments to investigate the geometrical properties of turbulence using fractal and wavelet techniques. This includes turbulence developments and particle dispersion in pipe flows.

The new modelling is being used to improve existing CFD software, such as FLUENT. Kinematic simulation can be used as a subgrid to improve particle tracking. An application of particular interest is in the study of particle deposition in the human airway.

Professor Derek Sinclair
d.c.sinclair@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

Research interests

Our research is involved with the synthesis and characterisation of oxide-based functional ceramics. The properties and applications of many functional ceramics depend on the close control of the crystal structure, composition, ceramic microstructure, dopants and dopant (or defect) distribution. Materials of well-defined composition are synthesised and characterised by a variety of diffraction, spectroscopic, microscopic, analytical and thermal techniques. The electrical properties are usually characterised by ac impedance spectroscopy, in preference to dc or conventional fixed-frequency measurements. This multi-technique approach is backed up with atomistic modelling (defect chemistry) and finite element modelling (electrical microstructure) to rationalise the composition-structure-property relationships in important functional ceramics which include dielectrics, solid electrolytes, mixed conductors and thermoelectrics.

Dr Ashley Willis
A.P.Willis@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

Research interests

* Patterns in fluid flows and their stability to perturbations.

* Transition to turbulence and chaos in shear flows.

* Generation of magnetic fields by the motion of fluids, e.g. the geodynamo.

* Founder of - openpipeflow.org -


A description of the mathematics behind the following videos can be found here.

I am interested in supervising motivated students with a strong mathematical background, in applying their knowledge and learning new techniques for the study of dynamical systems. An excellent setting for new methods, perhaps the traditional test-bed, is the modelling of fluid flows. Unexpected transitions in flow patterns and chaotic behaviour are commonplace, and our understanding of nature is greatly enhanced through numerical simulation and experiments. I am particularly interested in the appearance of turbulence in fluid flows, and modelling of the flows inside planets. The latter is usually responsible for the generation of planetary magnetic fields. For further information please contact me. The following links may also be of interest: Turbulence. Dynamos.

Dr Paul Armitage
p.armitage@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease
The Medical School

Research interests

My primary research interest is in the development of post-processing methods for quantification of MRI data. In particular, for techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, arterial spin labelling, image registration, MR signal modelling and their application to stroke, brain tumours, epilepsy and small vessel disease. My imaging interests span the entire age range from the foetus through to the ageing population.

Dr Mahnaz Arvaneh
M.Arvaneh@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering

Research Interests:

  • Biomedical signal processing, machine learning and pattern recognition
  • Statistical and adaptive signal processing, and mathematical modelling of bioelectric signals
  • Neural and cognitive process, clinical applications, and understanding
  • Brain–computer interface algorithms, systems, adaptation, and applications
  • Robotic and BCI-based stroke rehabilitation
  • Neuroprosthetic learning and control
  • Medical system and device research and development

Keywords: Automatic Control and Systems Engineering

Professor Ian Burgess
ian.burgess@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

Research interests

In the mid-1980s Prof. Burgess began a very fruitful and enduring collaboration with Roger Plank (recently retired as Head of the Architecture Department at Sheffield) in developing numerical techniques for modelling of the behaviour of steel and composite elements in fire. A finite element approach developed progressively from 1990 as the emphasis gradually shifted from members in isolation towards the performance of whole steel and composite framed building structures and sub-frames. The current Vulcan software is capable of non-linear modelling of 3-dimensional composite buildings as temperature distributions develop through the cross-sections of both beam-columns and slabs. The series of full-scale fire tests on the multi-storey building at Cardington were a vital ingredient in the development of the software, and in understanding the complex interactions which take place in fire. Vulcan is still being developed by the research group, but a designers’ version with an interactive graphical interface is now marketed through a University spin-out company Vulcan Solutions Ltd. This is now being used in performance-based design of fire protection strategies by leading UK consultants, and was the winner of two British Computer Society national awards in 2005. The main thrust of the research remains in numerical modelling, but some very successful experimental work has been done at Sheffield in developing a component approach to connection modelling for fire conditions. The most important current theme of the research group, after the tragic events of 11 September 2001, concerns the robustness of connections in fire and the avoidance of progressive collapse of buildings in fire. The research has been funded mainly by the EPSRC, but has also attracted funding both from industry and other government agencies. So far the research programme on fire has 28 PhD and 3 MPhil graduates and has generated more than 250 publications.

Dr Matt Carre
M.J.Carre@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

Matt's research interests involve applying mechanical engineering concepts to situations that involve human interactions with products, devices and surfaces. This has developed from past research which focused on the development of sports equipment and surfaces and can now be considered as five main themes:

  • Shoe-Surface Interactions
  • Tribology of Human Skin
  • Human-Object Interactions
  • Modelling Damage to Human Bones
  • Design Methodologies for Sports Equipment and Surfaces
Dr Dylan Childs
d.childs@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Animal and Plant Sciences

Research interests:

Life history theory – Characterising optimal reproductive strategies and components of selection in free-living populations.

Evolutionary demography – Application of evolutionary game theory (aka adaptive dynamics) to long-term demographic datasets.

Structured population modelling – Construction / parameterisation of accurate demographic models (e.g. integral projection models).

Host-parasite dynamics – Exploring the impact of environmental variation on dynamics (e.g. seasonal forcing in malaria)

Professor Julian Gunn
j.gunn@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease
The Medical School

Research interests

My higher degree was in the field of local coronary artery injury and healing, and my interests since then have exclusively centred on coronary artery disease (CAD), its endovascular treatment with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI; angioplasty), the injury and healing resulting from that, computer modelling of CAD, and how we can improve upon the results of PCI. This research spans basic research, in vivo experimentation and translation into clinical studies. I supervise Academic Clinical Fellows and students at BMedSci, MD and PhD level.

Professor Shuisheng He
s.he@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

Shuisheng and his group conduct research in the field of fluid mechanics and heat transfer combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with experimental studies. Their research activities often fall in one of the following areas:

  • Nuclear thermal hydraulics
  • Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) and flow of supercritical CO2
  • Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)
  • Turbulence modelling
  • Unsteady turbulent flow
  • Buoyancy-influenced flow
  • Biofluids
Dr Rekha Jain
R.Jain@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

Dr Rekha Jain works in the field of solar physics in which one studies various phenomena that occur on the Sun. She is interested in:

  • investigating the effects of magnetism on the oscillations.
  • studying wave propagation through gravitationally stratified atmospheres.
  • resonant modes of magnetic loops in the sun's corona.
  • understanding how the Sun's outer atmosphere is heated to million degrees.
  • modelling of magnetic reconnection and nanoflare heating.
  • numerical simulation of forced magnetic reconnection.
Dr Bryn Jones
b.l.jones@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering
Research interests:
  • Feedback control of fluid flows.
  • Bluff body drag reduction.
  • LiDAR-based wind-turbine gust prediction.
  • Unmanned surface vehicle control and sea-surface estimation.
  • Wind-turbine individual blade-pitch control.
  • Control of spatially distributed systems.
  • Low-order modelling for control of high/infinite dimensional systems.
  • Thermo-electric energy harvesting systems.
  • Novel technologies for marine and polar science
Dr Berna Keskin
b.keskin@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Urban Studies and Planning

Research interests

My research interests focus on understanding the structure of urban housing markets and specifically exploring the relative merits of different approaches to capturing neighbourhood segmentation within house price models by using quantitative methods. My research adopts a variety of econometric methods to the analysis of property markets by investigating the effectiveness of different modelling techniques at capturing housing market segmentation.

Dr Georgios Konstantopoulos
g.konstantopoulos@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering

My research interests lie in the intersection of the ‘control systems’ and ‘power systems’ research areas, in particular:

  • Advanced control design of power electronic converters;
  • Nonlinear modelling and control of renewable energy systems (PV, wind power, etc.);
  • Nonlinear stability of microgrids and smart grids;
  • Control design of electrical drives and vehicles;
  • Fault ride-through control of grid-tied converters (inverters, rectifiers);
  • Conditions for stability of power networks;
  • Fundamental nonlinear control theory.
Professor Zi-Qiang Lang
z.lang@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering
Research interests:
  • Nonlinear system modeling, analysis and design in the frequency domain
  • Health monitoring and fault detection of engineering systems and structures
  • Smart structures and systems
  • Wind turbine system condition monitoring and control
  • Passive and semi-active vibration control with applications in marine, automobile, civil, and earthquake engineering
  • Development of new healthcare technologies using complex system modelling and analysis approaches
Professor Shankar Madathil
s.madathil@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering

Research interests

  • Power semiconductor devices and technologies
  • High temperature Power Electronics
  • Active Gate Drive technologies
  • High Power Density Converters
  • Power Integrated Circuits for Lighting, Automotive and Switched Mode Power Supplies
  • High Voltage thin film transistors & integration aspects
  • Modelling of power semiconductor devices & technologies
  • New concepts for semiconductor devices & technologies
  • Power Semiconductor devices & technologies for harsh environments
  • Wide Band gap Power Semiconductor devices and technologies
  • Nano technologies for Power Electronic Applications


Dr Manoj Menon
m.menon@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Geography

Research areas and interests

My research group investigates a wide variety of topics related to environmental soil science and management. This includes soil physics and hydrology, soil structure development, soil - biotic interactions and soil threats (compaction, pollution and flooding). 
We also study environmental impacts of soil management such as conservation tillage practices and organic amendments. We also use high-resolution imaging techniques and modelling (at different spatial scales) tools to understand soil processes.

See more at http://drmenon.staff.shef.ac.uk/index.html

Dr Nils Mole
N.Mole@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

Nils Mole works on problems in turbulent diffusion, in particular on the atmospheric dispersion of hazardous gas clouds. The specific topics of main interest are: the relationship between statistical moments of the containment concentration; mathematical modelling of the concentration moments; the probability distribution of concentration in meandering plumes; measurement errors in concentration data; application of statistical extreme value theory to large concentration values. He also does some work in collaboration with the solar physics group, on the effect of random flows on solar oscillations.

Dr Eleanor Stillman
E.C.Stillman@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

My main research interests lie in the practical application of statistics to geology and materials science. A long term concern has been the modelling of particle size, with investigations into its relationship with sediment transport processes and strength of composite materials. Other recent projects include the use of classification methods in pollen analysis, the design of resistant glazes and the production of computer-assisted-learning materials.

Dr Eleanor Stillman
E.C.Stillman@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Probability and Statistics

Research interests

My main research interests lie in the practical application of statistics to geology and materials science. A long term concern has been the modelling of particle size, with investigations into its relationship with sediment transport processes and strength of composite materials. Other recent projects include the use of classification methods in pollen analysis, the design of resistant glazes and the production of computer-assisted-learning materials.

Professor Steven Thornton
s.f.thornton@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

Research interests

Dr Thornton's research experience covers contaminant hydrogeology, with particular interests in the application and performance assessment of natural attenuation for pollution management, laboratory and field studies of biodegradation of organic contaminants in groundwater, the transport and fate of pollutants in dual porosity aquifers, geochemical reactive transport modelling, groundwater impacts from landfills, attenuation of landfill leachate in clay liners, aquifers and the design of reactive barriers for landfills, and hydrogeological processes and solute transport across the groundwater-surface water interface.

Dr Lorna Warren
l.warren@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Research interests

Much of my early research centred on social care for older people, though it also extended to other aspects of community and health care services and their impact on the lives of service users and carers. More recently, I have focussed on issues of representation in later life, looking at the construction and framing of ageing and care-giving. I draw from a mix of anthropological, social policy, sociological, social gerontological, and feminist perspectives and approaches and the intersection of gender and age has been a key focus of my work. My interests include social and cultural dimensions of ageing, intergenerational relations and informal or family care relationships, which I have explored predominantly through qualitative methods, including interviews, focus groups, observation (participant and non-participant), ethnography, life stories and more recently visual approaches. I recognise the importance of `user involvement´ and interdisciplinarity in research and am committed, in particular, to the development of participatory research, raising questions about how we come to know what we know about the lives of people who use services and the connection of this knowledge with policy and practice.

I have recently completed 2 major research projects:

The social process of everyday decision-making by people with dementia and their spouses, an ESRC-funded study carried out with Dr Geraldine Boyle (PI) which aimed to explore and raise awareness of the decision-making abilities of people with dementia. 

Representing Self – Representing Ageing,  part of the cross disciplinary New Dynamics of Ageing Programme: http://www.newdynamics.group.shef.ac.uk/ and which I carried out, as PI, with Professors Merryn Gott and Susan Hogan. Known more familiarly by the title of Look at Me! Images of Women and Ageing, the project worked with women in Sheffield to explore representations of women and ageing in the media and to produce new images to challenge existing stereotypes: http://www.representing-ageing.com/. I won an ESRC Outstanding Impact in Society Award for the project in 2014 and am continuing to extend the project's impact through activities including intergenerational work in schools.

My other research activities have included:

The ESRC Older Women’s Lives and Voices project, exploring issues affecting the quality of life of older women across different ethnic groups within Sheffield and their involvement in services available to them:

The European Commission funded MERI project (Mapping Existing Research and Identifying Knowledge Gaps Concerning the Situation of Older Women in Europe), a collaborative project involving 13 EC countries and designed to contribute to the development of European studies and policy to improve older women’s lives.

Postgraduate Supervision

I have supervised 9 students to successful completion at PhD (x 8) and MPhil (x 1) levels. I am currently primary supervisor of 1 full-time and 5 part-time PhD students, including a joint location student (Trinidad and Tobago). I welcome applications to study full-time or part-time with me for MPhil or PhD research degrees that are related to my activities and experience. I would be particularly interested in hearing from students who wish to undertake participatory research with older people and carers.

 

Professor Harm Askes
h.askes@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

Research interests

His research interests are the modelling of engineering structures and materials. The two main themes are Numerical Methods and Mechanics of Materials:

Numerical Methods:

  • Error estimation and mesh adaptivity are required for efficient and accurate finite element analysis. Of particular interest are novel Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulations based on the equilibrium of configurational forces.
  • Constraint equations are an essential ingredient of many mathematical models. Recent work includes the use of negative penalty functions in terms of stiffness or inertia, and the simultaneous use of stiffness penalties and inertia penalties.

Mechanics of Materials:

  • Failure of engineering materials is simulated within a multi-scale modelling framework using the homogenisation of Representative Volume Elements. For strain-softening materials this requires special measures, such as the coupled-volume approach that links micro and macro-scale volumes. Recent developments focus on extending this methodology to dynamics.
  • Gradient-enriched continuum theories can be used to capture a range of microstructure-driven phenomena such as wave dispersion, size effects and strain localisation. Of particular interest is the implementation of gradient theories, which is normally not straightforward due to the higher-order continuity requirements. Research is carried out to re-formulate fourth-order equations as a set of coupled second-order equations.


Dr Abigail Hathway
a.hathway@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

Research interests

Abigail’s research focuses on fluid flow in the built environment, incorporating building simulation, particularly CFD, with experimental and field work.

Her PhD considered CFD modelling of bioaerosols released in hospital environments due to nursing activities and was completed at the University of Leeds. The research involved the combination of both airflow modelling with bio-aerosol experiments and field sampling. The role of human activity on indoor air continues to be an active research interest, and has developed to consider a variety of built environments, and is often developed through interdisciplinary collaboration. Her main interest is in the interactions of people with their building and the resulting impacts on air flow across the building envelope and between interior spaces. Such research is important for understanding indoor air quality and the transport of contaminants in indoor spaces, as well as the evaluating the true potential for natural ventilation in buildings.

Further research into urban microclimates complements the indoor air research by considering the role of urban design on pedestrian comfort and the implications for the fresh air entering buildings.


Professor Roger Lewis
Roger.Lewis@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

Roger's research interests are split into three areas: solving industrial wear problems; application and development of a novel ultrasonic technique for machine element contact analysis and design of engineering components and machines. The research themes are wide ranging, but the main focus is on:

Railway Engineering

  • Wheel/rail contact tribology – including wear (wheel profile evolution), RCF, friction management (use of top of rail friction modifiers; grease lubrication and traction gels), isolation and links to effective train detection
  • Rail infrastructure improvement – including laser cladding of rail to reduce wear/RCF; design and testing of insulated rail joints; overhead line wear testing
  • Condition monitoring – including real-time measurement of the wheel/rail contact; force measurement and detection of loosening in bolted joints.

Human Interactions

  • Fundamental characterization and modelling of skin friction including use of OCT to determine sub-surface skin strain
  • Hand/object interactions – including kitchen equipment, sports equipment etc. and effects that wearing medical examination gloves has on dexterity, grip and tactile discrimination
  • Human tissue interaction with medical devices including catheters
  • Pedestrian slips and falls, particularly barefoot slips and characterisation of flooring performance
  • Multi-scale modelling of skin to incorporate effects of moisture and temperature to optimise design of medical products that interface with skin.
Dr Christophe Pinna
c.pinna@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

Dr Pinna's research activities are in the fields of mechanics of materials, experimental mechanics and computational solid mechanics applied to the areas of the thermo-mechanical processing of metals (including forging, rolling and friction stir welding), composites, fatigue, damage and fracture as well as machining. The work involves multi-scale experiments at both room and elevated temperatures using conventional as well as small-scale testing machines (tensile and bending inside a Scanning Electron Microscope).

Full-field strain measurement techniques including optical 3D Digital Image Correlation, Scanning Electron Microscopy-based Digital Image Correlation and microgrids generated using electron lithography are being used to quantify strain distributions in specimens as well as over representative areas of microstructures.

Modelling techniques involve finite element models (including implicit/explicit, arbitrary Langrangian-Eulerian and XFEM formulations) combined with cellular automata for damage modelling as well as crystal plasticity finite element models coupled with phase-field models for simulations of microstructure deformation and evolution (recrystallization and phase transformations including texture prediction).

Dr Colin Smith
c.c.smith@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

Research interests:

  • Limit analysis in geotechnics: development of new numerical and analytical tools, including development of a  new numerical technique Discontinuity Layout Optimization (DLO) for solution of plasticity problems and its application in a range of areas including offshore and unsaturated soils.
  • Masonry arch bridge analysis, modelling and assessment, including the development of a full scale plane strain testing tank for soil structure interaction in masonry arch bridges in collaboration with the University of Salford.
  • Design code development focusing on theory and application of design codes using numerical methods and Eurocode 7.
  • Unsaturated soil-structure interaction. Soil physics, soil-biology interaction and micromechanics.

The experimental work has a strong basis in physical modelling, supported in particular by innovative digital imaging techniques.  Whilst at Sheffield his research has been funded by EPSRC, NERC and industry.

He is co-founder of a University spin-out company LimitState Ltd. The company specialises in the development of novel ultimate limit state analysis and design software applications which make use of research methods developed in the University, including LimitState:GEO, a rapid tool for geotechnical limit analysis in use in industry and universities in over 30 countries across the world.

Professor Guy Brown
g.j.brown@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Computer Science

Professor Brown's main research interest is Computational Auditory Scene Analysis (CASA), which aims to build machine systems that mimic the ability of human listeners to segregate complex mixtures of sound. He also has interests in noise-robust and reverberation-robust automatic speech recognition, models of auditory function in normal and impaired hearing, binaural modelling and the phonetics of overlapping speech. A recent interest is the application of CASA technology in mobile robot platforms. He is the co-editor (with DeLiang Wang) of Computational auditory scene analysis: Principles, Algorithms, and Applications (IEEE Press/Wiley-Interscience).

Professor Nathan Hughes
nathan.hughes@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of Sociological Studies

Nathan supervises PhDs in issues related to youth and young adults, crime and criminalisation, and childhood neurodevelopmental disability.

His research is at the interface between social policy, criminology and developmental sciences. It considers the explanations for patterns of offending apparent in emerging understandings of typical and atypical adolescent neuromaturation, and their implications for policy and practice. His work is uniquely interdisciplinary within his field, drawing on developmental psychopathology and adolescent developmental science to support biosocial modelling of patterns of offending and desistance, and applying this to a critical analysis of criminal justice practices and interventions. In particular, he focuses on practices and interventions that discriminate against and criminalise young people as a result of neurodevelopmental disability, and those that engage young adult offenders.

Dr Miguel Juarez
m.juarez@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

I am interested in Bayesian hierarchical modelling for panel and longitudinal data, in particular to address problems in econometrics and biology.  I have developed mixture models capable of accommodating skewness and non-Gaussian tail behaviour in econometrics. I have been involved in developing models for systems biology as well, specifically trying to understand gene regulatory networks. Recentrly, I have developed models to analyse images from super-resolution microscopy.  I am also interested in objective Bayesian methods and their relationship with measures of information.

Dr Charles Lord
c.lord@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research Interests

Dr. Lord's research interests are in the area of structurlal dynamics, specifically for vibrations and control. He is also interested in developing new materials and material systems that can control vibrations. These research interest include:

  • Multiscale modelling for dynamical systems and model development
    • reduction of nonlinear systems
    • finite element formulations for nonlinear systems
  • Passive damping systems
    • frictional systems - layered composites, braided structures, mesh structures, porous system
  • Novel composite materials
    • high damping capacity
    • metal matrix
  • Finite element for large models
    • quick modal strategies - super elements
    • formulation of reduced elements
Dr Alberto Marzo
a.marzo@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering
Research interests

Dr Marzo's research area stands at the interface between the physical and life sciences. It is firmly rooted in engineering and mathematics in the context of computational fluid mechanics, including state-of-the-art fluid-structure interaction, and cardiovascular biomechanics, but has a strong emphasis on clinical interpretation and translation of engineering technologies into clinical tools.
  • Numerical modelling of wall motion in cardiovascular applications
  • Image-based computational vascular haemodynamics
  • Minimally invasive image-based interventional planning and guidance
  • Influence of haemodynamics on cardiovascular disease
  • Influence of lifestyle on haemodynamics and cardiovascular disease
  • Fluid structure interaction and flow-induced oscillations in elastic vessels
Dr James Shucksmith
j.shucksmith@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

Research interests

Dr Shucksmith's primary research focus is the physical processes that drive water quality transformations within urban drainage and surface water environments. This includes developing techniques for understanding and mitigating the likely pressures on water management caused by climate change, population growth and asset deterioration. His work ranges from experimental based research into solute mixing processes within open channels, vegetated flows and urban flood waters to more applied work in collaboration with industry on integrated water quality modelling and real time control systems. In collaboration with colleagues James also works in fields such as eco-hydraulics, urban flooding and sustainable urban drainage systems.

Professor Martin Thornhill
m.thornhill@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

1. Tissue engineering, biocompatibility and in vitro modelling of disease

Also see:

Centre for Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering - Tissue engineering of oral mucosa

Centre for Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering - Biocompatibility testing and evaluation

Centre for Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering - Tissue engineering of oral mucosa

2. Cellular interactions with the endothelial lining of blood vessel

Centre for Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering - Tissue engineering of blood vessels

3. Targeted drug delivery

Centre for Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering -Tissue engineering of oral mucosa

4. Genetic epidemiology of oral disease

Professor Craig Watkins
c.a.watkins@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Urban Studies and Planning

Research interests

My current and recent research focuses on the structure and operation of property markets, particularly local housing systems, and the impact of public policy on real estate market performance. This research addresses theoretical and empirical issues and is generally, although not exclusively, located within a quantitative economic framework. There are four main sub-themes to this work:

  • Analysing the submarket structure and operation of local property markets. 
  • Measuring and modelling property market performance. 
  • Exploring the interaction between planning, public policy and property market behaviour. 
  • Methodological advances in property research.
Professor James Wild
j.m.wild@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease
The Medical School

Research interests

My research focus is the physics and engineering and clinical applications of MR imaging of hyperpolarised gases (3He and 129Xe) and protons in the lungs and pulmonary vasculature.

Physics and engineering projects include:

  • rapid acquisition methods for imaging of inhaled hyperpolarised gases using compressed sensing, steady state free precession and parallel imaging.
  • Techniques for simultaneous imaging of 1H, 3He and 129Xe in the lungs.
  • RF coil hardware engineering for 3He and 129Xe lung MRI.
  • 3He and 129Xe MRI at different magnetic field strengths.
  • Spin exchange optical pumping physics for polarisation of 3He and 129Xe.
  • Measuring and modelling gas flow and diffusion in the lungs; physiological models of alveolar geometry and gas exchange.
Dr Julia Rees
J.Rees@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

I undertake research into a wide range of problems that involve fluid mechanics. I have successfully supervised many Phd students - please get in touch if you are interested in doing a Phd!

Engineering Fluid Dynamics

My research interests are motivated by the desire to better understand the behaviour of fluids in order to make advances in practical engineering systems. My work involves collaborations with engineering industrial partners, as well as with colleagues from the Faculty of Engineering here at Sheffield. I am particularly interested in micro-bubble mediated flows - this refers to flows where the injection of a stream of small micro-bubbles significantly improves transfer rates. This has applications to a wide range of applications, including distillation and water purification.

Rheology

Rheology is the field of scientific research that investigates "how a fluid flows". I am particularly interested in fluids that don't follow the standard rules of Newtonian fluids. Such fluids are called complex or non-Newtonian fluids. My work in this area has involved experiments, asymptotic analysis and CFD modelling. 

Microfluidics for Biotechnology

My research focuses on the solution of inverse problems that arise in the sensing and control of lab-on-a-chip chemical analysis and chemical microreactor applications, and path-lab-on-a-chip biomedical analysis. The work involves modelling flow in microchannels and is carried out in collaboration with the Microfluidics Group from the Department of Chemical and Process Engineering at the University of Sheffield. 

Meteorology

My work involves modelling of the stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer and the analysis of meteorological observations. The Earth's boundary layer supports varied and complex waveforms, from internal gravity waves to turbulent eddies. I am particularly interested in large amplitude, solitary waves. In recent years this work has involved collaborations with the British Antarctic Survey, Meteorological Office and the Complutense University of Madrid.

Dr Annamaria Carusi
a.carusi@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease
The Medical School

I have a broad humanities background, ranging from philosophy to critical and literary theory. I am interested in connections between epistemic, social, ethical and aesthetic aspects of science, with a particular focus on material practices and technologies. My research is deeply influenced by phenomenology (especially Merleau-Ponty), and is also convergent with philosophy of science in practice, new experimentalism and new materialism. My recent research has focused on images, models, simulations and visualisations in the contemporary biosciences, and on the role of technologies in computationally intensive interdisciplinary settings. My work is highly interdisciplinary, and I have close collaborations in the broad field of science studies, as well as with scientists.

I am interested in supervising PhDs in any of the following areas:

  • social epistemology of modelling.
  • comparisons between different kinds of models in medical research.
  • social and philosophical aspects of images and visualisations.
  • technology mediated perception and knowledge, in particular with a phenomenological slant.
  • philosophy of medicine.
Professor Daniel Coca
d.coca@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering

Research interests:

My research work spans the broad area of nonlinear and complex dynamical systems. I am interested in developing novel mathematical, computational and analytical methods to analyse, model and control complex dynamical systems as well as apply the tools developed to complex systems in physics, engineering, life sciences and finance.

Complex systems modelling, identification and control:
Stem cell population dynamics; Crystal growth; Brain activity; Solar wind - magnetosphere interaction; Financial markets.

Bioimaging & biological data analysis:
Diffuse Optical Tomography; Protein Identification/Protein Mass Fingerprinting; Cell imaging data analysis.

Nonlinear Control Theory:
Controller design for nonlinear PDEs; Nonlinear predictive control.

Reconfigurable computers:
FPGA hardware acceleration of protein identification algorithms; FPGA implementation of computationally intensive control & optimization algorithms.

Professor John David
j.p.david@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering

Research interests

Impact Ionisation

  • Experimental study of impact ionisation, avalanche multiplication and breakdown in a wide range of materials and structures.
  • Theoretical modelling into hot carrier behaviour and the impact ionisation process.

Photodiodes and Avalanche Photodiodes

  • Characterisation of a range of photodiodes and avalanche photodiodes (APDs), covering the wavelength range from the UV to the LWIR. Materials studied include SiC, Si and most III-V alloys including AlInP, InAs, InP, AlGaAs and InGaAs.
  • Investigation into structures such as MQWs, Type II superlattices and QDIPs for advanced detectors in the MWIR and LWIR.
  • Development of single photon detectors (SPADs) in the near-IR.
  • Novel circuit design and development for enabling low excess noise measurements and quenching circuits for the SPADs.

Bismuth containing alloys

  • Growth and characterisation of GaAsBi and InAsBi by MBE.
  • Development of bulk and MQW diodes of GaAsBi, InAsBi for a range of opto-electronic devices such as solar cells, IR-photodiodes and lasers.


Dr Frank Hopfgartner
f.hopfgartner@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Information School

Research interests

My main research interests are:

  • Interactive Information Systems such as information retrieval, knowledge sharing, enterprise search, and recommender systems.
  • Experience in user modelling, gamification, personalized search and recommendation, user-centric evaluation, and other challenges that center around satisfying users’ information needs.

Research supervision

Some potential project ideas are: 

Document Analysis: Automatic information extraction, indexing, semantic analysis of text documents, analysis of low-level multimedia features, and the application of deep learning methods to classify multimedia content. Manual methods include work on engaging the crowd for data and document annotation and categorization.

Self-tracking & lifelogging and its potentials for personalization. Interested in the analysis, and visualisation of sensor and lifelogging data. Other challenges pertain processing vast amounts of data and identifying user interests, skills etc. and their usage in real world systems like health or recommendation systems.

Professor John Provis
j.provis@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

Research interests

His research centres on the development, characterisation and exploitation of advanced and non-traditional cement and concrete technology. Many projects involve alkali-activated and geopolymer binders, for use in construction, infrastructure and waste immobilisation applications. The range of topics covered include:-

  • Construction materials synthesis and testing
    1. Geopolymers – chemical and engineering properties
    2. Chemistry of alkali aluminosilicate gels
    3. Interactions with the environment (durability, fire testing)
    4. Other alkali-activated and Portland cement-hybrid concrete systems
    5. Rheology control
  • Waste immobilisation
    1. Nuclear wastes
    2. Heavy metals
  • Silica chemistry in complex aqueous environments
    1. Speciation and electrolyte solution chemistry
  • Hydrometallurgy
    1. Application of reaction engineering techniques
    2. Interactions involving silica (aqueous and surfaces) and gold
  • Ion exchange equilibrium modelling
Professor Eva Qwarnstrom
e.qwarnstrom@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease
The Medical School

Research interests

My research focuses on regulation of inflammatory responses, specifically on events related to receptor function and cell signalling. The programme includes analysis of activities induced by soluble mediators such as growth-factors and cytokines, and by biomechanical events, regulated through matrix structure and the cytoskeleton. Current studies focus on TIR mediated responses, primarily the analysis of Toll-like and IL-1 receptor function and signal transduction. Recent findings include identification of a novel TIR regulating receptor (TILRR), which controls immune and inflammatory signal transduction through the IL-1 type I signalling receptor. Work on signal transduction is centred on analysis of molecular mechanism controlling the NF-κβ pathway, with particular emphasis on signalling crosstalk, and the use of real time analysis of regulatory events. Collaborative projects include the use of single cell analysis and GFP-based methods as the basis for computational modelling of complex regulatory networks.

Dr Rosemary Staniforth
R.A.Staniforth@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology

Research Interests

Protein mis-folding and disease : the mechanism of amyloid formation.

My lab focuses on understanding mechanisms of amyloid formation that underly a wide range of diseases including neurodegenerative conditions (such as Alzheimer's disease) but also contribute to the formation of biofilms by bacteria. Devising effective inhibitors of these processes would provide us with the ability to combat degeneration in old age as well as produce novel antibiotics to combat bacterial infections. We have been measuring the rate of amyloid protein aggregation in vitro and have observed how these processes can be modulated by different chemical environments, something which drastically affects the potency of different natural inhibitors. We are using a combination of kinetic modelling and structural investigations using our state-of-the-art electron microscopy facilities to interpret these measurements. A better undertanding of these molecular processes will enable the design of more effective treatments in a surprisingly broad range of different pathological conditions.

Professor David Stone
d.a.stone@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering

Research interests

Prof Stone has interests in all facets of power electronics and energy storage, including:

  • Development of ‘smart’ battery packs for all-electric and hybrid-electric vehicles, based on both Li-based chemistries, Ni-MH and VRLA cells containing cell state-of-charge monitoring and conditioning electronics to extend the lifetime of the cells. Incorporation of observer techniques into state of function monitoring for cells to increase operation lifetime and consumer confidence in battery technology.
  • Investigation into second life operation of EV batteries for Grid support and localised energy storage.
  • High efficiency EV-contact less battery charging
  • Modelling and control of novel fluorescent lamps to improve the efficiency of light generation. Incorporation of physical lamp models (based on electron energy level interactions) into both Simulink and spice based packages has led to novel lamp models based on the physical interactions within the plasma
  • Design, modelling and digital control of high-order resonant converter topologies for high frequency switched mode power supplies for use in ‘white goods’, and concentrates on the analysis and design of high order resonant converter topologies, with the inclusion of piezzo electric transformers where possible.
  • Investigation into high frequency, high power, resonant converters for induction heating applications. Continuing work is now looking at the use of high frequency matrix converters (operating above 150kHz) for direct ac-ac conversion for heating applications.
  • Design and digital control of matrix converters for aerospace and sub-sea applications in specialist environments.
  • Power Electronics Packaging for high temperature and harsh environments, including high temperature gate drive design and thermal management of converters


Dr Ziqi Zhang
ziqi.zhang@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Information School

Main research interests

My research interests are in the areas of   Semantic Web, Natural Language Processing, Text Mining, Machine Learning and Data Science. Particularly in

  • Information Extraction: how to automatically turn unstructured, natural language text into structured representation that could support machine understandability and reasoning. This could include the extraction of terms, concepts, named entities, and relations between them from texts.
  • Social media analysis: the application and adaptation of Information Extraction methods onto social media text analytics, to discover knowledge that enable business intelligence or decision making in a wide range of domains.
  • Disambiguation: how to teach machines to automatically identify which meaning of a word or phrase is used within certain context.
  • Lexical semantics: how to represent the ‘meaning’ of a word, name, phrase, or sentence; how to measure the relatedness and similarity of these meanings (semantic relatedness and similarity). 
  • Knowledge base construction: the use of all the above technology in the automatic creation of structured ‘databases’ that support machine understandability and reasoning; and methods of mapping such knowledge bases (ontology alignment, ontology mapping). An example of a knowledge base is the Google Knowledge Graph, or DBpedia. 
  • Semantic Web and Linked Data: the use of all the above technology to enable the vision of tomorrow’s Web where machine understandable data are put on the Web, shared and reused across application, enterprise, and community boundaries.

Potential topics:

  • Detecting and tracking hate speech on the social media: Social media such as Twitter is increasingly exploited for the propagation of hate speech and extremism content and the organisation of related activities. Implementing effective counter measures depends on the real-time understanding of such content, i.e., automated detection of the emergence and spread of the content, and semantic content analysis. I am interested in developing novel, scalable text mining and machine learning methods that can support the automatic identification, analysis and tracking of hate speech on the social media.
  • Understanding the role of social media in the support of personal health management (with quantitative focus): social media is playing an important role in the generation and sharing of health information, as studies have shown that a substantial and increasing percentage of population is seeking and following health advice found on SMS. I am interested in developing methods that can automatically retrieve and analyse such information from social media to understand the impact of using such resources on health improvement. For example, what kinds of health related information are shared, and how much are considered useful by information seekers.
  • Mapping and aligning very large knowledge bases: Information Extraction techniques have been widely adopted in the automatic construction of very large knowledge bases (e.g., the Google knowledge base). However, one major challenge that remains for the use of such knowledge bases is heterogeneity, the fact that many different knowledge bases contain overlapping information that is described differently. Further, different knowledge bases often contain complementary data. For example, NELL has over 15,000 instances of ‘Disease’ while DBpedia has 5,600. I am interested in developing methods to align and integrate large scale knowledge bases, particularly those that are created by automatic text mining techniques, often contain noisy data (e.g., inaccurate facts). To do so, techniques such as Machine Learning, semantic similarity, and data mining will be used.
Dr Elisabeth Bowman
e.bowman@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

Research interests

Elisabeth’s fundamental research interest lies in understanding the micro-mechanisms of geomaterials undergoing deformation, that lead to the behaviour that we observe at the macro-scale. This has led to her current research into the following topics:

  • Creep of granular soils leading to observed ageing effects (as exhibited as increases in strength with time of freshly deposited sands, as displacement pile “set up” in granular soils, and as an increased resistance of older deposits to seismically-induced liquefaction)
  • Mechanisms behind the extraordinary spreading of large (>106 m3) and catastrophic rock avalanches
  • Mechanics of the motion of debris flows with a view to better modelling of their runout behaviour
  • Behaviour of granular flows within geotechnical centrifuge physical model experiments (influences of Coriolis and other induced effects)
  • Internal erosion of susceptible soils (such as glacial tills), which may lead to internal instability in embankment dams, levees and canals
  • Local deformation modes of model geosynthetic reinforced soil walls under seismic loading
Professor Angela Cox
a.cox@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism
The Medical School

Research Interests

My first area of interest is the identification and characterisation of both inherited and somatic genetic variants associated with cancer. We use statistical genetics and bioinformatics tools to fine-map cancer-associated genomic regions, and functional genomics to identify the candidate causal variants and their mechanism of action. We collaborate with colleagues in the School of Mathematics and Statistics in developing new statistical genomics approaches, and in the mathematical modelling of the effects of inherited variants on cancer hallmark phenotypes. We have a particular interest in the CASP8/ALS2CR12 region on 2q33, which exhibits pleiotropy and is associated with multiple common cancers. We participate in various international genetics consortia including BCAC, PRACTICAL, Interlymph, and ILCCO, and are members of the Sheffield Institute for Nucleic Acids (SInFoNia). Our current research is funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), Yorkshire Cancer Research (YCR), and Breast Cancer Now (BCN). 

My second area of interest is the use of circulating cell-free DNA as a source of tumour biomarkers. Tumours shed DNA into the circulation (ctDNA), and the ctDNA can be used to identify therapeutically-relevant tumour mutations, and prognostic biomarkers. We are using low coverage highly parallel seqencing for copy number analysis, and digital droplet PCR and targeted sequencing for mutation analysis, to identify predictive and prognostic markers in a number of common cancers for which we have sample resources. 

Professor Rob Dwyer-Joyce
r.dwyer-joyce@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

Professor Dwyer-Joyce's research covers a range of industrial wear and lubrication problems. The work involves the development of metrology tools, experimental techniques (wear, friction, bearings and lubrication rigs), and advanced analytical models. The projects are funded by a combination of EPSRC, EU and industry.

One research theme is the wear of engineering components. This involves testing on specimens and real components, as well as modelling and development of wear resistant systems. Projects have included wear of railway wheels, recession of engine valves, wear of rolling bearings, polymer bearing and gears, aircraft landing gear pins, and wear in automotive chain drives. Recently this work has been extended into aspects of bio-tribology, including design of a mandibular joint replacement, and human tooth wear.

Another activity is the development of sensors for studying interfaces in machine components. Instruments have been developed to determine the contact area and pressure distribution. This has been used to study contacts in CV joints, graphite nuclear reactor bricks, and seals. Some unique work has been performed to measure the contact stress in shrink fitted components like railway wheel axles.

Professor Richard Eastell
r.eastell@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism
The Medical School

Research interests

My research focus is osteoporosis. The University of Sheffield is well regarded for its contribution to the study of osteoporosis.  According to Thomson Reuter's Science Watch, we are ranked fourth among academic centres in the world for citations in osteoporosis, and first in the UK and Europe http://sciencewatch.com/ana/st/osteo2/institution/.  I study the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of the disease. This has involved developing and establishing assays for bone turnover markers and studying their clinical utility. I have developed new approaches to the definition of vertebral fracture and applied new approaches such as vertebral fracture assessment. I have developed tools to evaluate bone strength such as high-resolution quantitative computed tomography, ultrasound and finite element modelling of bone strength. I have evaluated the endocrine changes in osteoporosis to better understand its causes. I have designed and conducted clinical trials of nutrition and drugs for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. I have evaluated approaches to enhance compliance with treatment.

Professor David Kiely
david.kiely@sth.nhs.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease
The Medical School

I am the Pulmonary Hypertension Research Theme lead on the Sheffield Teaching Hospitals Respiratory Medicine Research Executive and lead the Pulmonary Hypertension Clinical Phenotype and Bioresource stream of the Sheffield Pulmonary Hypertension Research Network, where I collaborate closely with Jim Wild and Andrew Swift (Imaging), Allan Lawrie (Pre-clinical models and drug discovery) and my clinical colleagues in pulmonary hypertension Charlie Elliot, Robin Condliffe, Ian Sabore and Thanos Charalampopoulos. My research is primarily focused on the assessment and classification of pulmonary hypertension and the use of multimodality imaging. I am particularly interested in the use of imaging modalities to understand more about pulmonary vascular disease and I am collaborating with colleagues to understand more about pulmonary vascular disease using modelling and using an in silico approach (Insigneo). I have participated in multiple randomized controlled trials in pulmonary hypertension leading to the licensing of new treatments and have helped translate new imaging techniques into routine clinical practice. I currently participate in a number of research studies funded by the NIHR, MRC and BHF and am part of a UK collaboration characterizing genes and biomarkers in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

Professor Eric Palmiere
e.j.palmiere@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

Research interests

His research involves the microstructural evolution (utilising experimental techniques together with modelling techniques), and the subsequent development of mechanical properties, during the thermomechanical processing of both ferrous and nonferrous alloys. In his research, a wide range of mechanical tests are employed, including laboratory simulations of industrial metalworking processes (e.g., rolling, forging, extrusion etc.). Additionally, this research relies upon the quantitative characterisation of microstructure using a number of different techniques including light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. This work has led to empirical relationships between deformation processing parameters (e.g., temperature, strain, strain rate and interpass delay time) and the resultant microstructure for a given alloy composition. Although a number of alloy systems including aluminium alloys, metal matrix composites (MMCs), titanium aluminides and permanent magnetic materials have been studied, the focus is primarily on ferrous alloys such as stainless, microalloyed steels and associated model alloy steels. His work on the thermodynamic behaviour of NbC, and of its subsequent precipitation behaviour in microalloyed austenite has been recognised internationally, with the award of the Charles Hatchett Prize from the Institute of Materials (1995). He is particularly interested in developing a basic understanding between those softening (i.e., recovery, recrystallisation) and strengthening (i.e., solid solution, precipitation) mechanisms which occur either in austenite or in ferrite.

Professor Keith Worden
K.Worden@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

Keith's research is concerned with applications of advanced signal processing and machine learning methods to structural dynamics. The primary application is in the aerospace industry, although there has also been interaction with ground transport and offshore industries.

One of the research themes concerns non-linear systems. The research conducted here is concerned with assessing the importance of non-linear modelling within a given context and formulating appropriate methods of analysis. The analysis of non-linear systems can range from the fairly pragmatic to the extremes of mathematical complexity. The emphasis within the research group here is on the pragmatic and every attempt is made to maintain contact with engineering necessity.

Another major activity within the research group concerns structural health monitoring for aerospace systems and structures. The research is concerned with developing automated systems for inspection and diagnosis, with a view to reducing the cost-of-ownership of these high integrity structures. The methods used are largely adapted from pattern recognition and machine learning; often the algorithms make use of biological concepts e.g. neural networks, genetic algorithms and ant-colony metaphors. The experimental approaches developed range from global inspection using vibration analysis to local monitoring using ultrasound.

Dr Sam Dolan
S.Dolan@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

I am interested in the foundations and predictions of two very successful theories:

  1. Einstein's theory of General Relativity, which describes gravity, and the structure of the Universe on the largest scales - e.g. galaxies, black holes and the big bang.
  2. Quantum Field Theory (QFT), which describes the subatomic world and the weird quantum vacuum in which fundamental particles (eg. electrons, quarks, the Higgs boson, etc.) are created and destroyed.

Both theories are well-tested within their own regimes, and yet they seem to be fundamentally incompatible when brought together. This prevents us from fully understanding extreme scenarios, like the birth of the Universe, or the formation of black holes.

 

The predictions of QFT have been tested to extraordinary precision in the laboratory. To test Einstein's theory, we must look out into the galaxy and beyond. A key prediction of the theory is the existence of Gravitational Waves: propagating ripples in spacetime created by the massive bodies in motion. There is strong indirect evidence for their existence, coming from decades-long observations of binary pulsars. But as yet there is no direct evidence, because GWs are extremely weak by the time they reach Earth. It is very plausible that the first detection will be made in 2015 by newly-upgraded detectors. If detected, gravitational waves will give us an exciting new way of viewing the Universe, which will reveal some of the most energetic processes - such as the merger of black holes - which are currently hidden from view behind shrouds of dust and plasma. With this goal in mind, my recent work has been focussed on modelling the GW signal that is generated by black hole mergers, to help in our search for the 'needle in the haystack'.

Professor Anthony Ryan
a.ryan@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemistry

Research interests

The common theme in my research is phase transitions in polymers. Most recently we have used the knowledge of the thermodynamics and kinetics of phase behaviour in polymer blends and block copolymers to develop new processing methods based on self-assembly. This has led to the development of the new field of Soft Nanotechnology where synthetic and natural macromolecules are harnessed in a way that makes use of their intrinsic flexibility and susceptibility to Brownian motion to generate work from changes on molecular conformation. Developments in polymers responsive to their environment have lead to research into molecular machines, specifically the fabrication of molecular valves and motors.

We do polymer synthesis in order to have well defined systems to study. The dynamics of phase behaviour are studied by calorimetry, spectroscopy, rheology, microscopy and light, X-ray or neutron scattering. A full suite of microstructural analysis (atomic force, optical and electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and mechanical testing) is used to confirm the dynamic experiments and where appropriate computer modelling is also used.

My main contribution to the field has been the development and application of the techniques of time-resolved structural tools to polymers. This work was the subject of prizes in 1990 by the Plastics and Rubber Institute, in 1992, 1999 and 2003 from the Royal Society of Chemistry and in 1999 from the Polymer Processing Society.

I have been active in promulgating the public understanding of science since my graduate student days. This culminated in my appointment as the Royal Institution Christmas Lecturer for 2002 where my theme was the science and technology of everyday things. The lectures were seen on Channel 4 by 4.5 million viewers and have also been broadcast in Europe, Japan and Korea. I was also the 1st EPSRC Senior Media Fellow to allow me to combine world-class research and popular understanding of the impact of science and technology on society. I was awarded an OBE in 2005 for "services to science".

Dr Ian Sudbery
i.sudbery@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology

How do cells integrate information to make decisions about what genes should be expressed at a given time and in a given place? How do these processes malfunction to produce disease states? The correct regulation of gene expression is essential for the proper functioning of the cell, and incorrect regulation of genes is central to the mechanisms of many diseases. My interests rest in understanding how the many levels of eukaryotic gene regulation work together to perform these functions, using computational and functional genomics tools.

The role of microRNAs in regulatory networks


microRNAs (miRNAs) are short, single stranded RNAs that act to down regulate the expression of their targets by transcript destabilisation and translational inhibition. What roles to these molecules play in the information processing systems of the cell? How might these roles differ from that provided by transcriptional inhibitors? We know that miRNAs are found enriched in different topologies of network motifs than transcription factors. What might explain this?

Mathematical modelling suggests that miRNAs might threshold the expression of their target genes, only allowing protein production once transcription exceeds a particular rate. However, thus far experimental tests of this model are lacking in realistic in vivo settings. We are studying evidence that might speak to the applicability of this model in real biology, and studying the consequences of this behaviour on regulatory networks and the identification of miRNA targets.

Misregulation of chromatin structure in disease


A cell’s DNA does not exist as a single extended string of nucleic acids in the way often imagined, but rather is packed and folded in a myriad of ways to form a complex three dimensional structure. At least some of this structure is thought to be important for the regulation of gene expression. Transcription of metazoan genes is regulated by sequences known as enhancers which integrate diverse signals to make decisions about expression, and then communicate these decisions through their interactions with promoters. This communication is thought to take place via physical interactions between promoters and enhancers.

Together with collaborators from the Imperial University we are investigating how this three dimensional structure might contribute to the miss-regulation of gene expression in both monogenic disease and cancer using high-throughput, next-generation sequencing based assays of chromatin conformation.

Dr Abongeh Tunyi
A.Tunyi@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Abongeh Tunyi holds a B.Sc in Accounting (University of Buea), Master of Finance (MFin) with distinction (University of Glasgow), a PhD in Finance & Accounting (University of Glasgow) and a Post Graduate Certificate in Learning & Teaching in Higher Education (Liverpool Hope university). He is also a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (FHEA). Prior to Joining the Management School, Tunyi was a Lecturer in Accounting & Finance at Liverpool Hope University.

Teaching

Tunyi has previously taught modules in Corporate Finance, International Finance, Quantitative Methods, Management Accounting and Financial Management. He is currently the module leader for Issues in Finance (MGT6091). This module explores contemporary research and practice in advanced corporate finance and modern investment management. The module covers areas such as asset pricing, portfolio management, empirical methods (particularly, event prediction) in finance, behavioral finance, mergers & acquisitions, value relevance of CSR and CG strategies, and firm financing decisions.

 

Research

Corporate Finance, capital markets, mergers & acquisitions (M&A), bankruptcies, Corporate governance, Investment analysis and strategies, Corporate Finance & market-based accounting in emerging economies.

PhD Supervision

Tunyi welcomes PhD applications in all areas of his research interests.He is particularly interested in supervising projects in the areas of Mergers & Acquisitions and Corporate Finance & market-based accounting in emerging economies

Publications

Danbolt, J., Siganos, A. and Tunyi, A. (2016). Abnormal Returns form Takeover Prediction Modelling: Challenges and Suggested Investment Strategies. Journal of Business Finance and Accounting, 43(1-2) 66-97.

Tunyi, A. and Ntim, C. (2016). Location Advantage? Governance Quality, Stock Market Development and Firm Characteristics as Antecedents of African M&As. Journal of International Management, 22(2) 147-167.

Professor Beining Chen
b.chen@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemistry

Research Interests

The major focus of our research is to use computer aided molecular design and combinatorial chemistry to facilitate drug design and molecular recognition studies.

A. Therapeutics

TSEs, are progressive, invariably fatal neurological disorders occurring in sheep, cattle and humans, and in a variety of other ungulates, felines and rodents. The disease involves the formation of pathological deposits of protein in the brain. The protein responsible, the non-infectious cellular isoform of prion protein (PrPC), can adopt an aberrant insoluble infectious conformation (PrPRes), which accumulates extracellularly and is resistant to denaturation and digestion with protease. Aggregation of PrPRes leads to neural disorder and thereafter the death of animals and humans affected. The development of therapeutic compounds has always been considered as one of the most important and challenge areas to be tackled in TSE research. The project aims to develop drugs which interacts with the biosynthetic pathway of prion protein either to stabilise its conformation or to provoke the interaction of the protein with its abnormal counterpart.

Our main focus now is to develop novel drugs for prion disease to cure Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs) including Scrapie in Sheep, BSE in cattles and CJD in humans. Novel ideas together with well written proposal have recently secured her group major funding from the Department of Health worth over £1.15 million. We are also building up our research in natural product chemistry/bioorganic chemistry for lead discovery. Activities in therapeutics are expanding into other amyloid diseases as well as areas cardiovascular, CNS, anti-viruses.

B. Proteomics - Structural Studies of Abnormal Prion Proteins

With very few exceptions, all cells in the human body contain the same genes. We need to know what proteins are produced and are active in different cells and at different times, because it is the proteins that make things happen. For example, they govern how cells communicate with each other to mobilise an immune response, or to detect and respond to changes in their environment. The genome is a parts list and the proteome (the complement of proteins) is an activity report. Proteomics is about understanding the function of proteins, both individually and collectively.

The most challenging area in the study of TSE is to understand how abnormal prion protein forms, and its structure and functions. Modern available technologies such as x-ray crystallography and NMR prove to be little use in studying the abnormal prion conformation due to the special insoluble properties of the plaque formed during protein aggregation. Theoretical modelling using molecular dynamics and bioinformatics as tools together with various labelling techniques are being developed in Dr. Chen's group for the prediction of abnormal prion structures. 

Dr Anthony Haynes
a.haynes@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemistry

Research Interests

The Haynes group investigates mechanistic aspects of homogeneous transition metal catalysed reactions, particularly industrially important processes such as methanol carbonylation and alkene hydroformylation. Synthetic, spectroscopic, kinetic and computational methods are used to study the structure and reactivity of organometallic complexes and their roles in catalysis.

Mechanisms of rhodium and iridium catalysed methanol carbonylation

The catalytic carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid is one of the most significant industrial applications of homogeneous transition metal catalysis. We have a long-standing research collaboration with BP Chemicals, who operate methanol carbonylation plants worldwide, and introduced a new process(Cativa TM) in 1995 that uses a promoted iridium/iodide catalyst. Highlights of our mechanistic studies include the first spectroscopic detection of a highly reactive Rh-methyl intermediate in the rhodium-catalysed process[1] and elucidation of the role of promoters in the iridium-based system.[2] We recently showed that the rate of migratory CO insertion in [Ir(CO)2I3Me]- is dramatically increased by isomerisation to place a CO ligand trans to methyl.[3]

Ligand effects on oxidative addition and migratory CO insertion
 
We are interested in how the rates of key steps in catalytic cycles can be influenced by the electronic and steric properties of "spectator" ligands, e.g. phosphines, imines and N-heterocyclic carbenes. Strongly donating ligands tend to promote oxidative addition and retard migratory CO insertion, whereas sterically bulky ligands tend to have the opposite effects on these steps.[4] In a recent study of the mechanism of rhodium/xantphos-catalysed methanol carbonylation it was found that the key intermediates contained xantphos coordinated as a tridentate "pincer" ligand and the nucleophilicity of the metal centre is enhanced by a Rh---O interaction.[5]

Computational studies
Our experimental studies are complimented by theoretical calculations, carried out in collaboration with Dr. Anthony Meijer in this department. We are interested in modelling trends in organometallic reactivity and spectroscopic properties, e.g. vibrational spectra of metal carbonyl complexes.

Facilities
The department is well-equipped with modern instrumentation for NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, mass-spectrometry and chromatography. In addition, the group has dedicated FTIR instruments for kinetic measurements, including high pressure and stopped-flow IR cells.

References
1. (a) JACS, 1991, 113, 8567; (b) JACS, 1993, 115, 4093.
2. JACS, 2004, 126, 2847.
3. Inorg. Chem., 2009, 48, 28
4. (a) JACS, 2002, 124, 13597; (b) Organometallics, 2003, 22, 1047; (c) Organometallics, 2003, 22, 4451.
5. Organometallics, 2011, 30, 6166.

Professor Anthony Meijer
a.meijer@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemistry

Research Interests:

Our research focuses on the theoretical/computational study of chemical reactions. The systems studied vary from small fundamental gas-phase reactions via gas-surface reactions to reactions involving flexible molecules. The results of these calculations are used together with the results of sophisticated experiments to obtain insight into the fundamentals of the reactions involved and to get a fundamental understanding of reaction dynamics. Below are given some projects to illustrate the work.

Gas-surface scattering

We are currently working on the formation of H2 on graphite. H2 is the most abundant molecule in interstellar space and it plays an important role in the formation of stars and in interstellar chemistry through reactions with ions and radicals. Moreover, the energetics of the reaction directly influences the thermal balance of the interstellar medium. H2 is generally supposed to be formed on interstellar dust grains for which the graphite is used as a template. Our calculations complement experiments done in the group of Prof. S. D. Price at UCL and astronomical modelling and observations done in the groups of Prof. D. A. Williams and Dr. J. Rawlings at UCL through the Centre for Cosmic Chemistry and Physics.

Gas-phase reactions

We have done extensive work on the H + O2 combustion reaction in the past, in particular focusing on the role the total angular momentum in this reaction. This lead to the first-ever rigorous theoretical cross sections, which compared well with experimental data from the Wolfrum group at the University of Heidelberg. We are re-investigating this reaction in collaboration with Dr. M. Hankel of the University of Queensland.

We are also currently applying the methods developed to the photo-dissociation of molecules inside van der Waals complexes, such as Ar-H2S and Ar-H2O, where angular momentum effects allow the van der Waals molecule to survive when one of its constituent molecules, such as H2S, is dissociated. We also have plans to apply the developed methods to the calculation of rates for reactions between radicals at low temperatures, which is important for our understanding of the interstellar medium and our understanding of extraterrestial planets and moons.

Reactions and Structure of conformationally flexible molecules

As molecules become larger, they generally become more flexible. As a consequence the potential energy surface becomes more complicated with many local minima, which may or may not be accessible at thermal energies. Each of these minima will be a distinct structure with e.g. a distinct IR spectrum. We are currently working on methods to allow us to generate many minima, which can then be screened for further investigation. This work ties into a number of collaborations we have, such as with Dr. Mathias Schäffer of the University of Cologne, who studies conformationally flexible molecules in the gas-phase using IRMPD spectroscopy as well as internal collaborations on the structure, reactivity, and properties of organic and organometallic compounds.

Algorithm development for Quantum Dynamics Calculations

Quantum Dynamics calculations are significantly harder than standard electronic structure calculations due e.g. the exponential scaling with respect to the basis set size. We are working on methods that will allow us to solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation more quickly. In particular, we develop efficient parallel methods to make calculations tractable.

Dr Oleksandr Mykhaylyk
o.mykhaylyk@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of Chemistry

Research Interests

Scattering methods

Much of my research focuses on the structural analysis of soft matter materials and in particular polymers. We live in a Golden age of Materials Science and Biology, based on a solid underpinning from Chemistry and Physics. One of the keys to this success is recent progress in structural characterization techniques where scattering methods, giving access to structural organization of matter from atomic scales to microns, occupy a dominating role. Experimental data obtained by scattering methods (SAXS, WAXS, XRD, SANS and SLS) provide structural information associated with Fourier space. My research investigates how this information can be transformed into real space, convenient for our understanding. This involves structural modelling, Monte-Carlo simulations and Fourier transformation techniques. An advantage of scattering methods is that they can be used for kinetic studies of materials in-situ in different environments. Therefore, an other aspect of my work is design of dedicated experimental set-ups for studying materials under external impact such as shear flow or extensional flow, temperature or pH changes. I have a continuous interest in fat crystallization, colloids and nanoparticles structure, in particular core-shell systems (examples of my research are nanodiamonds to carbon onions transition, a phase separation of polyurethane confined by a nanosized spherical shell). My current research is on thermo-responsive block-copolymer micelles and vesicles.

Research Oleksandr Mykhaylyk

Mechano-optical rheology

Rheology is widely recognized as a basic method in processing of polymers, food and cosmetics. In addition, visualization can be used as an effective tool for studying phenomena taking place in fluids. Since soft matter materials subjected to flow often demonstrate a related anisotropy in their refractive index and stress, this causes birefringence visualizing the flow. I have recently developed a new combinatorial technique, shear-induced polarized light imaging (SIPLI), for rheo-optical measurements of polymeric liquids. The SIPLI technique has already been successfully used for studying shear-induced nucleation and crystallization of polyolefins (see the figure), fibrillation in natural silks and flow alignment of block-copolymer self-assembled structures. My present research focuses on further development of SIPLI for in-situ studies of shear-induced phenomena such as stress, orientation and structural transitions taking place in gels, polymers, copolymers, liquid crystals and colloids.

Polymer crystallization

Microstructure of solidified polymers depends on thermo-mechanical process history. In general, processed thermoplastics are composed of two structural morphologies: spherulitic (isotropic) and shish-kebab (anisotropic). Ratio of these morphologies in the end-product controls its mechanical properties and material performance. While spherulitic structure is reasonably understood there is still no a reliable theory for structural formation of shear-induced shish-kebabs. My work is on physical understanding of how the formation of shear-induced morphologies is related to polymer polydispersity, thermodynamics and flow conditions. Based on our research we have proposed a four-stage model for shish-kebab formation including stretching of molecules, nucleation, aggregation and fibrillation.