Research Supervisor Details

This page provides additional information about our research supervisors. You can either browser supervisors by department or search for them by keyword. Most supervisors also have a personal webpage where you can find out more about them.

Find by:
Please enter your search:

Professor Eva Kaltenthaler
e.kaltenthaler@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests:

My main interest is in the use of systematic review methods in health technology assessment.
My research interests are:
the use of rapid review methods
the review of evidence in cost effectiveness models
the use of evidence by poilcy makers

Mr Abdullah Pandor
a.pandor@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My research interests are:

  • Systematic review and meta-analysis of evidence for clinical effectiveness
  • Application and development of methods for the systematic review and synthesis of diagnostic evaluations in the field of health services research
  • Network meta-analysis (indirect and mixed treatment comparisons)
Dr Katy Cooper
k.l.cooper@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My research interests include:

• Systematic reviews of clinical effectiveness for healthcare interventions
• Development of methods for systematic reviewing and evidence synthesis, including rapid review methods
• Systematic reviews of complex interventions 
• Patient safety and quality of care
• Complementary and alternative medicine research

Dr Emma Hock
Emma.Hock@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

• Systematic review
• Systematic review methodology
• Health behaviour change
• Physical activity and wellbeing

Dr Munira Essat
m.essat@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

      • Systematic review of evidence for clinical effectiveness in healthcare

 

      • Health policy and decision making

 

      • Systematic review methodology
Dr Emily Wood
e.f.wood@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Areas of interest:
Mental Health
Spiritual Care
Health Services research
Mixed methods research
 
Methods:
Qualitative
Mixed Methods
Systematic Review
Single Case experimental design
 
Specific interests:
Treatment for long term depression
Mental health and physical health
Spirituality and mental health
Pain and depression
EMDR
Public mental health 
Global mental health
Developing complex interventions for mental health conditions

Dr Susan Baxter
S.K.Baxter@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Broad area of research interest:

  • Health services delivery
  • Methodologies of systematic reviewing

Research methods I can supervise:

  • Qualitative
  • Qualitative evidence synthesis
  • Systematic reviews
  • Theory-based reviews
  • Logic models

Specific areas of interest:

  • Interprofessional and team working in healthcare
  • Integrated health and social care systems and services
  • Evaluation of services and interventions
  • Patient experiences of healthcare
  • Professional practice
  • Communication systems and patient safety
  • Use of logic models in evidence synthesis
  • Methods to improve the presentation of evidence to stakeholders
  • Allied health professional services
Mr Andrew Booth
a.booth@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My research interests focus on all methods of systematic review,  evidence synthesis, evidence based practice, and knowledge translation. I am particularly interested in systematic review topics from developing countries, particularly from Sub-Saharan Africa, and in public health topics such as alcohol and HIV/AIDS. I have published with students in topics such as medication adherence, social marketing,  disaster management and evidence based management. My current research students are working in knowledge management in acute hospitals and use of NICE guidance in Social care.  I have been involved in development of a wide range of tools for dissemination, both web based and as online briefings. In 2013 I was one of the first to achieve the University of Sheffield's PhD by Publications with my thesis entitled Acknowledging a Dual Heritage for Qualitative Evidence Synthesis: Harnessing the Qualitative Research and Systematic Review Research Traditions. My most recent interests centre on multiple types of review, including rapid reviews, mapping reviews and scoping reviews.

Dr Marrissa Martyn-St James
M.Martyn-StJames@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My research interests include:
• Systematic reviews of clinical effectiveness for healthcare interventions
• Development of methods for systematic reviewing and evidence synthesis including meta-analysis, meta-regression, individual patient data analysis and mixed-treatment comparisons/network meta-analysis
• Critical appraisal and risk of bias assessment methods for systematic reviews
• Exercise interventions for health outcomes

Dr Jack Parker
j.parker@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

My special interests include:
• Implementing and evaluating innovative models of service delivery.
• Realist Evaluation, mixed-methods and qualitative methodologies.
• Rehabilitation

Dr Daniel Hind
d.hind@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

  • Systematic reviews
  • Controlled clinical trials
  • Qualitative research
  • Fidelity assessment and optimisation of interventions
  • Recruitment to controlled trials
  • Group interventions
Miss Diana Papaioannou
d.papaioannou@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

My research interests are in the following areas:

• Clinical trial design
• Systematic reviews
• Controlled clinical trials
• Validity and responsiveness of generic quality of life measures, particularly in mental health

Mr Chris Blackmore
C.M.Blackmore@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Broad area of research interest:

  • Mental health
  • Online learning
  • Technology (inernet, social media) 

Methods I am able to supervise:

  • Qualitative
  • Mixed Methods
  • Systematic review 

Specific areas of interest:

My main research interest is in the role of emotions in online learning, and more generally the impact of the internet on well-being. I have been involved in developing and evaluating e-learning Psychotherapy training resources across Europe. Since my doctoral research, I have become interested in the potential of learning analytics and the use of data on well-being to enhance and personalize students' learning, and the application of the same principles in analysing therapeutic interactions. I am developing an interest in narrative therapy and use of virtual reality.


Professor Marian Jones
m.v.jones@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research

My research interests are in the internationalisation of small firms, opportunity and capability development in small firms, and the associated entrepreneurial processes of learning, networking, collaborating and creating and exchanging knowledge.

I am also interested in the development of relevant theory and methods, and systematic review.

 

PhD Supervision

 

I would be interested in supervising projects on:

  • dynamic capability development in international new ventures
  • networks for prosperity
  • small firms - multinational collaboration and capability development
  • international new ventures, experience and reasoning
  • self-organisation and communities of practice in international entrepreneurship
  • new, innovative research ideas in the above or related areas

Marian considers mentoring of colleagues and students as fundamental to her professorial status and provides help and advice to external PhD students, visiting researchers and authors of proposals and articles as a reviewer

Dr Mauricio Alvarez Lopez
mauricio.alvarez@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Computer Science

Dr. Álvarez López is interested in machine learning in general, its interplay with mathematics and statistics, and its applications. In particular, his research interests include probabilistic models, kernel methods and stochastic processes. He works on the development of new approaches and the application of Machine Learning in areas that include applied neuroscience, systems biology, and humanoid robotics.

Dr Christopher Carroll
c.carroll@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Research interests
  • Systematic review and evidence synthesis of medical, health and social science topics, including qualitative and mixed method evidence synthesis
  • The Health Technology Assessment (HTA) process
  • Information retrieval and programme evaluation (implementation fidelity) research
Dr Alvaro Martinez-Perez
a.martinez-perez@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

My current research interests are:

  • Social stratification and inequality
  • Labour markets
  • Education
  • Family and gender
  • Migration
  • Electoral behaviour
  • Advanced multivariate methods (such as panel regression, event history analysis, multilevel analysis, multiple imputation)

I would be very keen to supervise PhD students with an interest in these substantive topics and with an interest in quantitative research methods.

Professor Jane Seymour
jane.seymour@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Nursing and Midwifery
Health Sciences School

I am a nurse by background and have worked in palliative and end-of-life care research and education since the early 1990s. My own PhD was a study of end of life decision-making in intensive care units. I have long standing interests in the palliative care needs of frail older people and how we can meet them, at a clinical level and health systems level. I also have interests in advance care planning, other aspects of end of life decision-making and public education in palliative and end of life care. I have publised and presented widely on these topics. I have research links in Europe and beyond.

I have supervised and examined PhD students from the UK and overseas (including Malawi, Uganda, Cameroon, India and the Middle East). I encourage students to undertake projects related to palliative care that fit with their own interests and prepares them to be leaders in palliative care nursing research in their own countries/ contexts.

My methodological expertise lies in qualitative and mixed methods research, with special interests in case study and ethnographic methods.

Dr William Mason
w.j.mason@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield Methods Institute

Will is a sociologist with interests in the study of childhood and youth, consumption, families, identities and inequalities. Before joining the Sheffield Methods Institute as a lecturer in Qualitative Methods, Will spent one year as a University Teacher in the Department of Sociological Studies (University of Sheffield) and two years as a Postdoctoral Research Associate, working on the Nuffield-funded Child Welfare Inequalities Project. This UK comparative study used mixed methods to identify and explain unequal rates of child welfare interventions, revealing strong relationships between area level deprivation and families’ chances of engagement with child protection services. Will’s ongoing research projects use a co-production approach to explore residents’ experience of community services in a low income neighbourhood and to explore the everyday lives of marginalised young people in a Northern inner city neighbourhood

Miss Suzanne Paisley
s.paisley@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

I joined ScHARR Information Resources at its inception in 1994. In 2000 I was seconded to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE), as a Technical Lead in the Appraisals Team. I returned to ScHARR as Managing Director of the Technology Assessment Reviews (TARs) programme funded UK NHS HTA Programme. In 2003 I was awarded a UK Department of Health fellowship looking at the retrieval and use of evidence in decision-analytic models of cost-effectiveness.

In 2009 I became Head of the ScHARR Information Resources Group (IRG) leading the Group's research and teaching activities and managing the information service for ScHARR staff and students and for NHS staff through the Yorkshire and Humber Research Design Service (RDS).

I am Associate Director of the NICE Public Health Collaborating Centre (PHCC) at ScHARR and of the Department of Health Economic Evaluation Policy Research Unit (EEPRU) based at ScHARR and the University of York

Research Interests

Information retrieval methods and problem structuring methods to support evidence synthesis. Specific areas of interest:

  • Use of evidence in the specification and population of decision-analytic models
  • Retrieval of evidence for reviews of complex interventions

Teaching Interests

  • MSc in Health Economics and Decision Modelling (HEDM) (Research Methods unit, Joint Lead)
  • MSc in International Health Technology Assessment, Pricing and Reimbursement (iHRAPR) (proposed) (Use of Evidence in the Design and Development of Models unit, Lead)

Professional Activities

Member of:

  • Health Technology Assessment International (HTAi) Information Resources Group
  • InterTASC Information Specialists' Subgroup (ISSG)
  • Cochrane Information Retrieval Methods Group (IRMG)
  • Campbell and Cochrane Economics Methods Group (CCEMG)

Current Projects

  • Department of Health Economic Evaluation Policy Research Unit (DH EEPRU).
    Co-investigator (PI: John Brazier). Department of Health (2010-2015)
  • NICE Public Health Collaborating Centre.
    Joint PI (with Ron Akehurst, Jim Chilcott, Liddy Goyder). NICE (2008-2011, 2011-2012)
  • Angioplasty for peripheral arterial occulsive disease (PAOD): systematic review.
    Co-applicant (PI: Jonathon Michaels). NIHR HTA (2010-2011)
Professor Katherine Runswick-Cole
k.runswick-cole@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Katherine welcomes supervisions in the areas of: critical disability studies; special educational needs and/or disability and childhood.

Dr Joanne Thompson
j.thompson1@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Academic Unit of Medical Education

My current research is focused around the Social Accountability of Medical Schools, the impact on medical students and community organisations working in partnership with the university. This involves supporting students to become more aware of health inequity and social determinants of health and the broader implications for society.


My background is in academic psychology and counselling and I have a longstanding interest in the psychosocial impact of illness, in particular in relation to cancer survivorship and the management of children with long term conditions

Dr Tracey Young
t.a.young@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My research interests are:

  • Methods for measuring uncertainty in economic evaluations
  • Methods for developing preference-based measures from existing QOL measures
  • Economic evaluations alongside clinical trials
  • Censored costs
  • Mapping
Dr Clare Gardiner
c.gardiner@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Nursing and Midwifery
Health Sciences School

My research interests are in palliative and end of life care, in particular the role of the family caregiver, palliative care in hospitals, care of older people at the end of life, and health economic approaches to palliative care. My methodological expertise lies mainly in qualitative, mixed methods research and evidence synthesis

Dr Elisabeth Garratt
elisabeth.garratt@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield Methods Institute

Beth joined the Sheffield Methods Institute as a Lecturer in Quantitative Methods in September 2019. Before this, she was a Research Fellow at the Centre for Social Investigation, Nuffield College, Oxford. She completed her PhD in Social Statistics at the University of Manchester in 2015, exploring the role of income on mental health in 3-12 year-old British children and their parents. Her research focusses on mental health in adults and children, poverty, food poverty, and homelessness.

She is a strong believer in engaging with non-academic audiences, and to this end has spoken about food insecurity on TV and radio. Her research on UK food insecurity has received widespread press coverage, been cited in government debates and was also made into an impact film.

Professor Harm Askes
h.askes@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

Research interests

His research interests are the modelling of engineering structures and materials. The two main themes are Numerical Methods and Mechanics of Materials:

Numerical Methods:

  • Error estimation and mesh adaptivity are required for efficient and accurate finite element analysis. Of particular interest are novel Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulations based on the equilibrium of configurational forces.
  • Constraint equations are an essential ingredient of many mathematical models. Recent work includes the use of negative penalty functions in terms of stiffness or inertia, and the simultaneous use of stiffness penalties and inertia penalties.

Mechanics of Materials:

  • Failure of engineering materials is simulated within a multi-scale modelling framework using the homogenisation of Representative Volume Elements. For strain-softening materials this requires special measures, such as the coupled-volume approach that links micro and macro-scale volumes. Recent developments focus on extending this methodology to dynamics.
  • Gradient-enriched continuum theories can be used to capture a range of microstructure-driven phenomena such as wave dispersion, size effects and strain localisation. Of particular interest is the implementation of gradient theories, which is normally not straightforward due to the higher-order continuity requirements. Research is carried out to re-formulate fourth-order equations as a set of coupled second-order equations.


Professor Caitlin Buck
C.E.Buck@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

My research draws on experience in archaeology, palaeoenvironmental science and statistics, encouraging experts from a range of fields to share ideas and resources. Previous and current work includes:

 
  • analysis of field survey data from Britain and Greece.
     
  • the calibration and interpretation of groups of related radiocarbon determinations.
     
  • the provenancing of archaeological ceramics with the aid of chemical compositional data.
     
  • development of models for relative archaeological chronology building (seriation).
     
  • analysis of the structure of prehistoric corbelled domes.
     
  • the use of Bayesian radiocarbon calibration to aid in tephrochronology.
     
  • models for interpreting spatio-temporal data such as those relating to the recolonisation of a landscape in response to past climate change or the arrival of domesticated cereals at the start of the Neolithic in Europe.
     
  • the development of models and methods for estimating radiocarbon calibration curves.
     
  • development of tailored statistical models to aid in palaeoenvironmental reconstruction on the basis of data preserved in ice cores and lake/ocean sediments.
Ms Fiona Campbell
f.campbell@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My research interests are:

  • Use of evidence to support decision making
  • Incorporating non-RCT evidence in systematic reviews
  • Assessment of patient reported outcomines in clinical trials and methods of synthesis
  • Methods of synthesising qualitative and quantitative reviews
  • Use of expert opinion in systematic reviews
  • Any issues relating to improving health in low and middle income countries
Dr Huiping Xian
h.xian@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research

Her research interests include women's careers, HRM issues in Chinese organisations, qualitative research methods, cross-cultural research and translation issues in international research. Her current projects include ‘Developing Women’s Careers in Japan’ which is funded by the British Academy.

PhD Supervision

Currently, Huiping is supervising a PhD project, which looks into female knowledge workers' flexible work and career development. She is interested in supervising in the following topics:

  • Management Issues in China
  • Qualitative Methods
  • Cross-cultural Research
  • Gender Studies

Professional Activities, Recognition and Other Information

Huiping is a HEA Fellow.

Publications

Xian, H.P., Atkinson, C. and Meng-Lewis, Y. Guanxi and High Performance Work System: Evidence from a Chinese State-owned Enterprise. International Journal of Human Resource Management, forthcoming 2017.

Woodhams, C., Xian, H.P. and Lupton, B. (2015). Women Managers’ Careers in China: Theorizing the Influence of Gender and Collectivism. Human Resource Management (US), 54(6) 913-931.

Xian, H.P. (2015). Leftover Women: The Resurgence of Gender Inequality in China. Gender in Management: An International Journal, 30(2) 179-182.

Woodhams, C., Lupton, B. and Xian, H.P. (2009). The persistence of gender discrimination in China – evidence from recruitment advertisements. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 20(10) 2084-2106.

Xian, H.P and Woodhams, C. (2008). Managing careers: Experiences of successful women in the Chinese IT industry. Gender in Management: An International Journal, 23(6) 409-425.

Xian, H.P. (2008). Lost in translation? Language, culture and roles of translator in cross-cultural management research. Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, 3(3) 231-245.

Full list of publications

Dr Lindsay Blank
l.blank@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests:

General areas of interest

  • Healthy living topics such as healthy eating, physical activity, wellbeing


Specific areas of interest

  • Prevention and management of type 2 diabetes


Research methods I am able to supervise: 

  • Qualitative
  • Quantitative
  • Evaluation
  • Mixed methods
Professor Georg Struth
g.struth@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Computer Science

Georg works mainly on logical and algebraic methods in computer science, formalised mathematics with interactive theorem provers and program verification and correctness. His interests range from foundational work on the axiomatisation and semantics of sequential and concurrent computing systems to applications in the design and implementation of program verification software.

Dr Mario Vettore
m.vettore@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Research interests

My research interests include the link between oral conditions and general health, inequalities in oral health, social determinants of oral health and oral health related quality of life. My expertise involves quantitative methods and statistical multi-level modeling as well as systematic reviews and meta-analysis.

Dr Bhupendra Khandelwal
b.khandelwal@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research Topics

  • Effect of different alternative fuels on gas turbine performance, noise, vibrations and emissions
  • Novel Low Emissions Combustors
  • Low Carbon Combustion Methods including catalytic/hydrogen assisted combustion
  • Effect of Ash on Gas turbine combustors
  • Particulate Matter measurement and reduction technologies
  • Hydrogen Combustion and Combustors
Miss Jill Carlton
J.Carlton@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

Broad Research Interests:

My research interests are health-related quality of life and patient outcome measures. In 2006 I was awarded a fellowship (Researcher Development Award) through the National Co-ordinating Centre for Research Capacity Development, NCCRCD). My PhD involved designing a paediatric disease-specific health related quality of life measure for amblyopia. The Child Amblyopia Treatment Questionnaire (CAT-QoL) is a short questionnaire that was designed for children aged 4-7 years to measure the impact of amblyopia treatment from the child’s perspective. 

 

Research Methods I can Supervise:

  • Instrument Development
  • Mixed Methods

 

Specific Areas of Interest:

  • Paediatric
  • Quality of Life
Professor John Derrick
j.derrick@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Computer Science

Research interests

Specification, refinement and testing using formal methods:

  • Refinement in state-based systems
  • Verification of concurrent algorithms
  • Testing distributed and concurrent systems
  • Integrated formal methods
  • Testing of formal specifications
  • Process algebraic refinement
  • Frameworks for distributed systems: architectural semantics, specification templates, object orientation, interfaces

I have specific interest in the use and theory of refinement in specifications languages. We have recently been applying this to the verification and liearizability of concurrent algorithms. Work on testing includes that on property-based testing for distributed applications (e.g. those written in Erlang), and reverse engineering. I have coordinated two EU FP7 grants in this area (ProTest and Prowess).


Dr Kirill Bogdanov
k.bogdanov@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Computer Science

Research interests

In traditional software development, specification and testing do not play an important role. In particular, changes to software code do not normally get reflected in a specificaton. At the same time, specification-based testing methods are very important for maintaing software quality, for identification of missing or incorrectly-implemented behaviour. K.Bogdanov's research aims to develop a method and a tool to take an incomplete state-based specification, hints for developers as to how it relates to code and both (1) extract an up-to-date specification and (2) generate tests from it.
A number of existing specificaton-based testing methods rely on a program under test being built with testing in mind, and lose a lot in power if this is not true. In his work, observation of program behaviour under test is used to make up for the missing information about a system, making it more amenable to testing using these methods. 
More recent work focuses on passive inference of software models from logs, where it is not possible to attempt experiments on a system being reverse-engineered.

Dr Rebecca Parry
r.l.parry@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Becky’s research is focused on children’s media cultures in terms of what they play, read, watch and participate in and what they create and share. Becky is especially interested in developing pedagogies which support children’s creativity and criticality in relation to digital media. Her doctoral research focused particularly on children’s film and included the use of participatory and visual research methods.

Dr Lindsey Rice
L.Rice@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Law

Research Interests

  • Police and Policing (in particular criminal investigation, vulnerability and police training/education)
  • Police Reform (in particularly, the civilianisation and privatisation of ‘core’ provision and services)
  • Vulnerabilities Crime
  • Police Custody
  • Police Legitimacy
  • Private Security
  • Criminological Theory
  • Mixed Methods Research

Member of the Centre for Criminological Research Cluster
College of Policing – Policing Education Qualifications Framework network

Dr Lorna Warren
l.warren@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Research interests

Much of my early research centred on social care for older people, though it also extended to other aspects of community and health care services and their impact on the lives of service users and carers. More recently, I have focussed on issues of representation in later life, looking at the construction and framing of ageing and care-giving. I draw from a mix of anthropological, social policy, sociological, social gerontological, and feminist perspectives and approaches and the intersection of gender and age has been a key focus of my work. My interests include social and cultural dimensions of ageing, intergenerational relations and informal or family care relationships, which I have explored predominantly through qualitative methods, including interviews, focus groups, observation (participant and non-participant), ethnography, life stories and more recently visual approaches. I recognise the importance of `user involvement´ and interdisciplinarity in research and am committed, in particular, to the development of participatory research, raising questions about how we come to know what we know about the lives of people who use services and the connection of this knowledge with policy and practice.

I have recently completed 2 major research projects:

The social process of everyday decision-making by people with dementia and their spouses, an ESRC-funded study carried out with Dr Geraldine Boyle (PI) which aimed to explore and raise awareness of the decision-making abilities of people with dementia. 

Representing Self – Representing Ageing,  part of the cross disciplinary New Dynamics of Ageing Programme: http://www.newdynamics.group.shef.ac.uk/ and which I carried out, as PI, with Professors Merryn Gott and Susan Hogan. Known more familiarly by the title of Look at Me! Images of Women and Ageing, the project worked with women in Sheffield to explore representations of women and ageing in the media and to produce new images to challenge existing stereotypes: http://www.representing-ageing.com/. I won an ESRC Outstanding Impact in Society Award for the project in 2014 and am continuing to extend the project's impact through activities including intergenerational work in schools.

My other research activities have included:

The ESRC Older Women’s Lives and Voices project, exploring issues affecting the quality of life of older women across different ethnic groups within Sheffield and their involvement in services available to them:

The European Commission funded MERI project (Mapping Existing Research and Identifying Knowledge Gaps Concerning the Situation of Older Women in Europe), a collaborative project involving 13 EC countries and designed to contribute to the development of European studies and policy to improve older women’s lives.

Postgraduate Supervision

I have supervised 9 students to successful completion at PhD (x 8) and MPhil (x 1) levels. I am currently primary supervisor of 1 full-time and 5 part-time PhD students, including a joint location student (Trinidad and Tobago). I welcome applications to study full-time or part-time with me for MPhil or PhD research degrees that are related to my activities and experience. I would be particularly interested in hearing from students who wish to undertake participatory research with older people and carers.

 

Dr Todd Hartman
t.k.hartman@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield Methods Institute

Todd is a political scientist and joined the Sheffield Methods Institute in 2014. Prior to this, he was Assistant Professor of Political Science at Appalachian State University and Director of Survey Research for the Centre for Economic Research and Policy Analysis. He is a graduate of the University of California at Davis (BA in International Relations), San Francisco State University (MA International Relations), and State University of New York at Stony Brook (PhD Political Science). Todd has extensive experience conducting surveys and experiments, and his research focuses on political psychology (especially political attitudes and intergroup relations).

Professor Helen Kennedy
h.kennedy@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

I have supervised seven PhD students to successful completion. My research interests are:

  • social media;
  • data mining(on social media and elsewhere);
  • big data and data in society;
  • the role, meaning, uses, effects of data visualisation;
  • digital media theory and practice;
  • (digital) media work;
  • digital methods;
  • other inventive methods.

I’m interested in supervising PhD students working in areas such as:

  • Social media / social media data mining / big data / visualisation
  • Cultural & social issues relating to digital and social media
  • New media theory and practice
  • Media work, production practices and cultural labour.
  • Digital methods
  • Action research / participatory methods
  • Gender and the media / feminist STS.


Professor James Chilcott
j.b.chilcott@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

* Modelling in public health

* Modelling in cancer and cancer screening

* Methodological modelling interests including:

  • the modelling process and errors in HTA models
  • cognitive mapping for systematic reviews in complex settings
  • structural uncertainty in models
  • Bayesian analysis of joint disease natural history and test characteristics in screening
  • value of information methods
  • probabilistic sensitivity analysis methods
  • meta modelling
  • information gathering processes for models
Professor Elizabeth Goyder
e.goyder@sheffield.ac.uk

School of Health and Related Research

Research topics in the field of developing and implementing evidence-based public health including: health inequalities, access to health care, physical activity interventions, type 2 diabetes and diabetes prevention.

Research methods include mixed methods evaluations of public health and complex interventions and evidence synthesis/ systematic reviews of public health and complex interventions.

Dr Julie Balen
J.Balen@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Broad areas of interest:

  • Global health
  • Health policy and systems


Research methods I can supervise:

  • Mixed methods
  • Quantitative
  • Qualitative
  • Action research

Specific areas of interest:

  • Leadership and governance of global health and national/local health systems
  • Health systems organization and management
  • Resilience of health systems following complex emergencies/crises/disasters e.g. ebola outbkreak in West Africa; 2015 earthquake in Nepal
  • Integration of vertical and horizontal approaches to delivering health services
  • Neglected (tropical) diseases
  • Interdisciplinary research on health
  • Low-middle income country (LMIC) settings
Dr Aneta Piekut
a.piekut@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield Methods Institute

Aneta joined the Sheffield Methods Institute as a Lecturer in Quantitative Methods in 2014. She received her PhD in Sociology in 2010 after defending her PhD thesis “Highly skilled foreign employees in transnational corporations in Warsaw” at the Faculty of Philosophy and Sociology, University of Warsaw.

In 2005-2010 she was involved in comparative studies of international migration patterns in the Centre of Migration Research, University of Warsaw. In 2010-2014 she worked as a post-doctoral researcher for LIVEDIFFERENCE research programme at the Universities of Leeds and Sheffield, where she was responsible for secondary data analysis and mapping social diversity in Leeds and Warsaw, cross-sectional survey data investigation and conducting narrative interviews with Polish research participants

Dr Lien Monkhouse
L.L.Monkhouse@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

Following the achievement of an MBA degree (with Distinction) from the University of Leeds, Lien carried out her PhD research in consumer behaviour of East Asian luxury goods market. She has conducted peer review for a few marketing journals and conferences (for e.g. Journal of International Marketing, International Marketing Review, Journal of Business Research, Marketing Intelligence and Planning, AIB South East Asia conference, Academy of Marketing conference). Lien has a few papers in 3* journals and has presented at different international conferences in her research area.

Lien is currently supervising three PhD students at the Management school. When she has spare capacity again, she will welcome students who would like to research in the following areas: quantitative methods, luxury goods buyer behaviour, East Asian culture, acculturation, and consumer research in general.

Dr Ysabel Gerrard
y.gerrard@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies
My research mainly focuses on how the policies of technology and social media companies further marginalise particular social identities. Broadly speaking, my research interests fall into the following categories:
 
  • Social media content moderation
  • Digital identities (particularly gender and race)
  • Feminist media theory
  • The ethics of social media research
 
I would be particularly interested in supervising students researching one of the following topics:
 
Social media content moderation: I am interested in various aspects of the content moderation process, including: the process of writing policies, the implementation of new rules, press/public responses, and users’ reception and circumvention. I am especially interested in policies that heavily affect marginalised populations, like adult content bans and mental health-related rules.
 
Secret-telling apps: I have begun a new project about secret-telling social media apps and am interested in supervising students who also have interests in this area. 
Dr Kai Zeng
k.zeng@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Animal and Plant Sciences

My research has focused on population genetics. I am particularly interested in developing realistic and computationally tractable models for analyzing DNA sequence data. The aim is to understand how fundamental evolutionary processes such as mutation, genetic drift, genetic recombination, and natural selection interact with one another, and the impact of these interactions on evolution.

Dr Mohammed Nassar
m.nassar@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Biomedical Science

Research Interests

My research is focused on investigating the excitability of primary sensory neurones. The cell bodies of these neurones make Dorsal and Trigeminal sensory ganglia, and are part of the peripheral nervous system (PNS).

These neurones convey sensory information from skin and internal organs (e.g. viscera, muscles and bones) to the central nervous system (CNS). Sensory neurones convey both innoxious and noxious stimuli. The latter is perceived in the CNA as pain.

My research interest lies in investigating the molecular changes in sensory neurones that underlie pathological pain. My lab uses a variety of methods based on molecular biology, cellular biology, imaging and functional imaging to identify targets for novel and effective analgesic drugs.

Dr Tim Highfield
t.j.highfield@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

My research focuses on how digital media and related technologies intervene within everyday life, encompassing visual, temporal, cultural, and political perspectives. Much of my work examines how the everyday cultural practices of digital media users intersect with political themes and issues, such as how digital content, and especially visual forms, are used to make sense of politics. I am also interested in the aims and roles of digital platforms themselves in making and shaping these interventions, and how these relate to the cultures and practices of their users.

 

I am interested in supervising PhD students investigating topics including:

  • Visual social media

  • Everyday digital cultures

  • Digital media politics

  • Time and digital media

  • Digital methods

Dr Liz Croot
l.croot@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My research interests are:

  • Access to and provision of equitable services for individuals from marginalised groups
  • Learning disabilities
  • Health behaviour particularly weight management
  • Qualitative methods
  • Narrative research
  • Cross lanaguage qualitative research
  • Realist synthesis
  • Complex intervention development and evaluation
Dr Ros Williams
r.g.williams@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of Sociological Studies

My research falls at the intersections of Science and Technology Studies, Sociologies of Race and Ethnicity, and Digital Sociology.

My current and previous research includes:

  • exploration of institutional practices of stem cell banking which included looking at race classifications, legacies of health care inequity, and genetic understandings of racial differences in blood and tissue in a UK context
  • digital health and self-monitoring technologies - user, commercial and policy perspectives through ethnography, interview, and novel material methodologies
  • stem cell donor recruitment activities in minority communities including ethnography of minority community donor drives, and digital method-based analysis of online minority ethnicity recruitment campaigns that focus on mixed raced donors

Interested in supervising research students who are focused on the following topics (in UK and/or other national/regional/international contexts)

  • health activism - particularly targeted at, or taking place within, racialised communities
  • processes of racialisation (and, more generally, invocations of racial difference) within biomedical contexts
  • mixed raced experience, particularly in the context of health, and of new genetic sciences
  • the intersection of race/ethnicity and digital media in general
Dr Casey Strine
c.a.strine@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield Institute for Interdisciplinary Biblical Studies
Department of History

Research interests:

Casey studies the history, literature, and cultures of the ancient Near East with a specialization in ancient Israel and Judah. His research focuses on the uses for the study of migration in reconstructing ancient history and interpreting ancient texts. Casey is especially interested in how involuntary migration—people fleeing environmental disasters, war, or persecution in various forms—influences the ways groups construct their history, tell those stories, and respond to the other cultures they meet in their movements.

Casey's current projects focus on the ways that the social scientific study of forced migration provides new insights into the interpretation and historical growth of the Pentateuch generally, with a particular focus on the ancestral narrative in Genesis (chs. 12–50).

Dr Chengzhi Peng
c.peng@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Architecture

Research on sustainable bioclimatic design with future climate: how performance-based design can contribute to sustainability and livability in future climate? I am currently supervising PhD projects on: (1) Correlating cooling energy use with urban microclimate for estimating future indoor thermal conditions and cooling demands of a city's housing stock; (2) Machine learning methods for modelling morphological links with aspects of urban microclimate; (3) Future climate and change in livability of a city's housing environment.

To date, I have supervised eight successfully completed PhDs. I am particularly interested in supervising  PhD projects to investigate building stock energy modelling for sustainable renovation, livability of a city's housing environment in future climate, and machine learning methods for accelerated environmental simulation of performance-based design.

Dr Stewart Smyth
s.j.smyth@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research

Stewart's research interests cover a range of topics including accountability relations, particularly in the public services, social housing and public finance, critical accounting studies and qualitative research methods in accounting. In 2014 Stewart was the oragniser for the IAFA annual conference and doctoral colloquium held at Queen's University, Belfast.

PhD Supervision

Stewart is interested in supervising doctoral students in the following areas:

  • Critical accounting studies
  • Public accountability
  • Social movements and accounting
  • Critical research methods in accounting, including critical realism, dialogics and classical Marxism
  • PPP equity transactions
  • Social housing finance

Knowledge Transfer and Impact Activities

In 2013, the Northern Ireland Public Services Alliance (NIPSA) commissioned Stewart to write a report on public housing policy in Northern Ireland, Keeping our Housing Public. In 2014, Stewart was part of a team undertaking an investigation into the Total Cost Indicators for Social Housing Grants on behalf of the Northern Ireland Housing Executive (NIHE) and the Department for Social Development (DSD).

Stewart has been invited to speak at conferences on housing policy in Northern Ireland organised by AgendaNI and Policy Forum for Northern Ireland.

Dr Diane Burns
d.burns@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School
Research interests
  • Health & Social Care at home and in institutions
  • Care recipent's and care worker's perspectives and knowledge 
  • Financialisation of social care, business models and managment
  • Social innovation in home care provision - a Wellcome Trust funded project 2017-18.
  • Diane's Department of Health and Comic Relief funded project examined organizational cultures in care homes for older people and positive experiences of care. This study was conducted with colleagues at the University of East Anglia, University of Stirling, University of Worcester and Cardiff University.
  • Recently Diane was involved in a two and half year, Department of Health and Comic Relief funded participatory project with care home residents and family carers to examine the organisational dynamics of abuse and respectful care of older people in care homes.

Diane’s research examines organizational arrangements, cultures and change in health and social care systems with two sub themes – organizational failure and institutional abuse in care homes; and social innovation in home care provision.

Diane is interested in supervising qualitative research in health and social care systems and organization; job quality, care workforce and labour arrangments; care quality, abuse and mistreatment in organized care; voice, power and whistle-blowing in the workplace and other organizations; collaborative forms of organizing and partnership. 

Diane is particularly interested in action research, participatory appraoches and co-production, and the development of organizational ethnography using visual methods, poetics and film.

Dr Malcolm Patterson
m.patterson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

PhD Supervision

I am currently supervising PhD students in the following areas:

  • destructive leadership
  • emotions, moods and innovative work behaviour
  • knowledge sharing
  • organisational interventions to enhance employee engagement
  • start-up journeys of entrepreneurs
  • participative action research interventions to improve quality of patient care

I would welcome applications and inquiries in these areas and related areas corresponding to my areas of expertise listed above.

Publications

Knight, C;, Patterson, M.G, Dawson, J and Brown, J (2017). Building and sustaining work engagements- a participatory action intervention to increase work engagement in nursing staff. European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, 26(5) 634-649.

Knight, C;, Patterson, M. and Dawson, J. (2017). Building work engagement: A systematic review and meta-analysis investigating the effectiveness of work engagement interventions. Journal of Organizational Behavior Education, 38(6) 792-812.

Madrid, H.P. and Patterson, M.. Creativity at work as a joint function between openness to experience, need for cognition and organisational fairness. Learning and Individual Differences, forthcoming 2016.

Stephan, U., Patterson, M., Kelly, C. and Mair, J. (2016). Organizations driving positive social change: A reveiw and an intergrative framework of change processes. Journal of Management, 42(5) 2016.

Madrid, H., Patterson, M. and Leiva, P. (2015). Negative core affect and employee silence: How differences in activation, cognitive rumination and problem-solving demands matter. Journal of Applied Psychology, 100(6) 1887-1989.

Madrid, H.P., Patterson, M.G., Birdi, K.S. and Leiva, P.I. (2014). The role of weekly high-activated positive mood, context, and personality in innovative work behavior: A multilevel and interactional model. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 35(2) 234-256.

Full list of publications

 

Dr Kevin Hughes
K.J.Hughes@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Kevin's research covers a range of topics related to fuel combustion, fuel degradation and deposit formation, pollutant chemistry, proton exchange membrane fuel cells, and process modelling in carbon capture and storage systems.

In the area of combustion, degradation, and pollutant chemistry, the approach is a combination of experimental and theoretical investigation; for example the elucidation of a simple laminar flame structure by a combination of conventional species sampling techniques allied to laser diagnostic probing of the flame structure using the technique of planar laser induced fluorescence. This provides data that allows for the validation of detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms. These mechanisms are constructed by a variety of means ranging from experimental measurements of individual reaction rates, crude estimation by analogy, group additivity based methods, detailed theoretical calculation using quantum chemistry methods, and the application of master equation models to calculated potential energy surfaces. Insight is further gained by the application of sensitivity analysis methods to both allow the simplification of detailed mechanisms, and to highlight those regions of particular importance for the phenomena of interest.

In the area of proton exchange membrane fuel cells, the focus is on the CFD modelling and the experimental testing of small scale devices, and the systematic investigation of their performance as a function of operating conditions and the properties of the individual fuel cell components such as electrical conductivity and gas permeability. This is complemented by an experimental and theoretical investigation of novel catalysts, using quantum chemistry methods to predict behaviour, along with catalyst synthesis, physical and electrochemical characterization, and finally testing in real fuel cell systems.

Carbon capture and storage related research is focused on novel operating procedures related to gas turbines linked to solvent capture plants, with the aim of optimizing the overall system performance, and understanding the chemistry of solvent degradation and emissions.

Dr Melanie Hassett
melanie.hassett@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research

My research interest lies in internationalization strategies, particularly cross-border mergers and acquisitions (M&As), post-acquisition socio-cultural integration and organisational change, emotions and cultural differences. Currently my research focuses on emotions in M&As and M&As from emerging economies, particularly India. I am also very interested in research methods particularly qualitative research methods, longitudinal, case study and mixed method approaches.

PhD Supervision

I am interested in supervising PhD students in the following areas:

  • International mergers and acquisitions
  • Post-acquisition integration and socio-cultural integration
  • Internationalisation (SMEs and MNEs)
  • Emotions, social capital, informal networks in the context of internationalisation and/or mergers and acquisitions

Publications

Hurmerinta, L., Paavilainen-Mantymaki, E. and Hassett, M. E. (2016). TEMPUS FUGIT: A hermeneutic approach to the internationalization process. Management International Review, 56(6) 805-825.

Hassett, M., Vincze, Z., Urs, U. and Angwin, D. (2016), “Cross-Border Mergers and Acquisitions from India: Motives and Integration Strategies of Indian Acquirers”, in Marinova, S., Larimo, J. & Nummela, N., Value Creation in International Business, Palgrave Macmillan-SpringerDegbey, pp. 109-139.

Degbey, W. and Hassett, M.E. (2016), “Creating value in cross-border M&As through strategic networks”, in Heinz Tüselmann, Stephen Buzdugan, Qi Cao, David Freund and Sougand Golesorkhi, Impact of International Business: Challenges and Solutions for Policy and Practice, Palgrave Macmillan: Basingstoke, pp. 158–177.

Nummela, N. and Hassett, M. (2016), “Opening the black box of acquisition capabilities”, in Risberg, A., King, D. and Meglio, O., The Routledge Companion of Mergers and Acquisitions, Routledge Companion Series, Routledge: Oxon, pp. 74–91.

Dr Ciara Kelly
c.kelly@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research Interests

I have two established streams of research. Both streams aim to further our knowledge of socially responsible and sustainable practices. One focuses on individual level practices and the other focuses on organisations and industry.

At the individual level, I focus my research on building our understanding of how individuals’ roles and experiences outside of work influence their work lives, and vice versa. To do this I examine the impacts of leisure activities, idiosyncratic deals (‘i-deals’) and interpersonal emotion regulation on employees work and non-work lives. My research contributes to the literature on work-life enrichment by providing a more nuanced understanding of the roles individuals fulfil, beyond the traditional focus on family. It sheds light on broader mechanisms that facilitate individual success and productivity in the workplace. I do this through intensive longitudinal quantitative methods- often referred to as diary studies.

At the organisational and industry level, my research deals with how businesses and public bodies can positively impact wider society.

I have worked on multidisciplinary projects such as:

 

  • Comparative Police Studies in the EU (COMPOSITE), a European project examining policing processes across countries.
  • Mainstreaming Assisted Living Technology (MALT), a TSB funded project aiming to facilitate the large scale introduction of telehealth technology.
  • Active Workforce Initiative (AWI), a BOHRF funded project examining the impact of positive psychology interventions on the well-being of police and health workers.
  • Business Driven Social Change, an NBS funded review of literature on the techniques and outcomes of business driven social change.

PhD Supervision

I am interested in supervising PhD students who would like to examine issues to do with the interface between work and other life domains - this can include work-life balance, enrichment and conflict pertaining to family and leisure domains as well as the impact of supportive supervisor behaviours on work-life balance.

Dr Andrew Lee
andrew.lee@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My main research interests are in the field of health protection-related topics such as disaster response and emergency planning, and the control of communicable diseases/infectious diseases. I am also interested in topics in international health, primary care as well as health service management.  Examples of my previous research and consultancy activities include

  • evidence review of the public health benefits of urban greenspace
  • study of the drivers of smoking in young people in Pakistan
  • study on beneficiary perspectives of humanitarian aid in Sri Lanka after the Asian Tsunami disaster
  • NIHR-funded study scoping the evidence base for emergency planning in health in the UK
  • NIHR-funded study examining the international evidence base for demand management interventions of referrals from primary to secondary care
  • evaluation of a telehealth intervention for patients with long term conditions 
  • developing evidence-based disaster management practice in the UK and Nepal,
  • investigating barriers to testing and treatment of Hepatitis B in the migrant Chinese ethnic population in the UK,
  • evaluation of the WHO in-country presence,
  • evidence review of interventions for malnutrition in emergencies,
  • studying the determinants of testing for latent TB infection in South Asians in the UK.

My current ongoing research projects (as of February 2017) are:  

  • developing a series of health research projects on slum health in Nepal,
  • evidence review of public health needs following earthquakes.
Professor Patrick Fowler
p.w.fowler@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemistry

Research Interests

Aromaticity: Attribution of aromaticity to a molecule is associated with a loose cluster of criteria based on geometric, energetic and reactivity properties, but one persuasive definition is based on magnetic properties: ability to sustain an induced diatropic ring current. Using modern ipsocentric methods it is possible to perform calculations that map the currents, giving a direct quantitative visualisation of aromaticity and anti-aromaticity, but also explaining the patterns of current in terms of orbitals, energies, nodes and symmetry the standard toolkit of qualitative chemical theory. Our most recent work includes a qualitative `band theory´ of the currents in giant graphite-flake molecules. Two new projects investigate the magnetic response of `exotic carbon nanostructures´, including toroidal and Möbius-twisted carbon (PhD research project of David Bean) and the connection between induced currents and the ballistic currents in single-molecule devices (PhD research project of Tsanka Todorova). We are working on ring-current aspects of the many proposed types of aromaticity, aiming to supply symmetry/topological criteria for each. We have strong collaborations in this area with Physical Organic and Theoretical Chemistry groups in Utrecht, Warsaw, Modena, Salerno and Toulouse.

Fullerenes: We are exploring the systematic theoretical chemistry of the fullerenes based on classical chemical ideas e.g. the 60+6k `leapfrog principle´ equivalent of Hückel´s 4n+2 rule. A series of papers and a book, the `Atlas of Fullerenes´ (OUP, now in Dover), have contributed to a comprehensive qualitative theory of the fullerenes using graphs, groups, and discrete mathematics to derive principles for enumeration, geometry, electronic structure, spectroscopic signature, isomerisation, growth & destruction, and reactivity. Rationalisation of stoichiometry, structure, symmetry of species such as fully brominated C60Br24 by purely combinatoric arguments led to our ongoing investigation of `closed-shell independence numbers´. We are collaborating on graph-theoretical aspects of fullerenes with Mathematics and Computer Science groups at the Universities of Ghent, Malta and Victoria (BC).
Gas-phase reactions

Molecular properties: Two areas of longstanding interest are the properties of weak complexes, modelled using electrostatic and other considerations from the theory of intermolecular forces, and the properties of ions in crystals, where the focus is on computation of the drastic effects of the crystalline environment on electric properties especially of anions, and the interpretation of these changes in terms of electrostatic and overlap models.

Interdisciplinary: Group theory as used by chemists has applications in many neighbouring fields. Symmetry generalisations of engineering principles such as Maxwell´s Rule and Mobility Criteria, symmetry aspects of mathematical theorems such as the Euler Theorem, and symmetry in packing and covering problems are being investigated with research collaborators in Cambridge, Leuven and Budapest.

Professor Shuxing Yin
shuxing.yin@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

Shuxing's research interests include corporate finance, corporate governance, market efficiency and anomalies. She has acted as referee for Journal of Corporate Finance, Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, British Accounting Review, European Journal of Finance.

She welcomes PhD applicants in the field of corporate finance, particularly focusing on Chinese (mainland and Hong Kong) markets, initial public offerings and market efficiency.

Professor Philip Benson
p.benson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Research interests

My primary research interest is investigating the effectiveness of contemporary orthodontictechniques and practice. I am the principal or co-author on five systematic reviews published in the Cochrane Library and I have planned, coordinated and completed several randomised controlled clinical trials. I am also interested in oral health-related quality of life and in particular developing patient reported outcomes to measure the impact of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment on young peoples’ everyday lives.

Professor Robert Hierons
r.hierons@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Computer Science

Professor Hierons’ research largely concerns software testing. The main aim of this research is to devise automated techniques (and tools) that generate efficient, systematic test suites on the basis of program code, models or specifications. Progress in this area can help industry to produce higher quality software and potentially to do so more quickly. He has recently become interested in the testing of autonomous systems, with a particular focus on robotics.

Dr Julie Jones
Julie.Jones@Sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Geography

Research interests

  • Reconstruction and analysis of Southern Hemisphere Atmospheric Circulation from proxy data, long instrumental records, and climate model simulations
  • The design and analysis of global climate model (GCM) simulations for the mid- and late-Holocene and development of methodologies for systematic comparison of these simulations with proxy data
  • Regional climate modelling with a focus on the European Alps
  • Links between atmospheric circulation and transport of air pollution


Professor Alison Loescher
a.loescher@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

In 2003 I initiated a service to manage patients with chronic orofacial pain. The service is now well established and receives referrals from a wide geographic area, including many tertiary referrals. The rarer causes of facial pain are frequently seen within the clinic making it a valuable teaching clinic for both medical and dental higher surgical trainees and dental undergraduate students. In the development of the facial pain service, links have been made with colleagues in neurosurgery, neuromedicine and palliative care. Weekly clinics, held with neurosurgery, review patients with trigeminal neuralgia requiring surgical treatment. This clinical interest in facial pain forms the basis for some of the research projects that are currently being undertaken.

Miss Bobby Nisha Syed Mohamed
b.nisha@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Urban Studies and Planning

Research interests

My current research is focussed on Evidence-based decision-making (EBDM) in urban design for regeneration. I am interested in the principles of evidence-informed analysis and decision making in design decision-making and looking to develop a process framework that incorporates tools and techniques of spatial analysis and review, to collate evidence, which then informs design decisions.

I also have a strong interest in design pedagogy for teaching and learning in studio based learning environments, and particularly the use of Virtual Reality/Augment Reality to support the development of design knowledge and skills.

Dr Robyn Orfitelli
r.orfitelli@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of English Language and Linguistics

My research is focused on the intersection between first language acquisition and generative syntactic theory. I use a variety of corpus and behavioral measures to experimentally analyze children’s acquisition of complex syntactic phenomena.

Recently, I have been interested in understanding the acquisition of a range of A-movement phenomena related to voice, including subject-to-subject raising, passives, and middles. I am working to link patterns in acquisition to systematic cross-linguistic differences in the representation of these structures.

Other current or recent topics of interest include the Null-Subject stage in first and second language acquisition, word-level prosody in Samoan, and the syntax-prosody interface in language development.

Dr Ian Gregory-Smith
i.gregory-smith@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Economics

Research interests

Ian’s primary research interests concern the executive labour market and related issues associated with gender, corporate governance, executive remuneration and shareholder voting. His work often applies econometric techniques to panel datasets. More recently, Ian's work on the executive labour market has developed to consider the implications for the firm's international strategy on issues such as exporting, hiring, networking, and innovation. He is also interested in how the economics of sport (particularly cricket) can provide insights into the processes by which decisions are made within firms.

Ian’s research has been used to inform policy at HM Treasury and the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS). Recently, he has made submissions to the BIS’ ‘Executive Remuneration’ and ‘The Future of Narrative Reporting’ Discussion Papers, and the ‘Hutton Review of Fair pay in the Public Sector’. He also engages with corporate governance industry participants such as Manifest Information Services Ltd.

Dr Sarah Drabble
S.J.Drabble@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

  • Endometriosis
  • Self-management of long-term conditions 
  • Process evaluations of trials using qualitative methods
  • Qualitative research methods
Mr John Stevens
j.w.stevens@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Research interests
  • the application of Bayesian methods in drug development
  • statistical methods in health economics
  • evidence synthesis
  • sample size determination under uncertainty
  • adaptive dose finding
Professor Paul Martin
paul.martin@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Research interests

I have two main areas of research interest. The first is the ethical, legal and social issues associated with emerging medical technologies and the second focuses on the commercialisation of biotechnology and expectation dynamics in medical innovation. My research has previously examined the development of gene therapy, genomics, pharmacogenetics, stem cells and regenerative medicine. I have advised the European Parliament, the Conseil d'Analyse Economique (part of the French Prime Minister's Office), the UK Department of Trade and Industry and the Wellcome Trust. I am a member of the Editorial advisory Boards of Sociology of Health and Illness and New Genetics and Society.

As regards my research interests in synthetic biology, I am currently a member of a BBSRC working group on synthetic biology, a co-investigator in a recently established multidisciplinary chell network and have co-authored a major review of the social and ethical issues raised by synthetic biology which was published in June 2008.

As regards my research interests in neuroscience, I am leader of a strand of research on neurosociety as part of the £1.6m Leverhulme Trust Programme Grant 'Making Science Public'.

Professor Mark Hopkinson
m.hopkinson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering

Research interests

  • Development of new methods and technology for the growth, processing and characterisation of III-V photonic devices and nanostructures.


Professor Alicia O'Cathain
a.ocathain@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

Mixed methods, evaluation of new health services, patient views of health care, urgent care.

Professor Lyudmila Mihaylova
L.S.Mihaylova@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering

Research interests:

Broad research in the areas of signal processing, Bayesian methods, Monte Carlo methods, nonlinear estimation, target tracking, sensor data fusion, control, autonomous and complex systems (e.g. image and video processing, transportation systems, large scale systems) – both at theoretical and applied level.

Miss Clara Mukuria
c.mukuria@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My research interests are:

  • Development and testing of preference-based health measures in different populations
  • Mapping between condition-specific and generic preference-based measures of health
  • Use of well-being measures in health and social care
Methods I can supervise:
  • Quantitative
  • Mixed methods
Dr Kevin Walters
K.Walters@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Probability and Statistics
Research interests

My research interests are in the application of statistical methods to uncover disease-causing DNA variants and the application of statistical methods in genetics generally. I have recently become interested in the statistical issues relating to next-generation sequencing and epigenetic phenomena, particularly the role of DNA methylation in disease aetiology.
Professor Jonathan Waltho
J.Waltho@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology

Research Interests

Application of multidimensional NMR methods to solving protein structures, protein folding pathways and protein molecular recognition.

Professor Richard Wilkinson
r.d.wilkinson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

Uncertainty quantification, Monte Carlo (especially Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) methods), applied statistical modelling, climate science.

Professor Mike Williamson
M.Williamson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology

Research Interests

Protein structure determination by 2D and 3D NMR, and interactions with ligands. Methods for characterising protein mobility on multiple timescales.

Dr Clare Relton
C.Relton@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Broad area of research interest: 

  • Health / utopia

Research methods I am able to supervise:

  • Qualitative
  • Quantitative
  • Mixed methods

Specific areas of research interest:

  • Pragmatic trial methods
  • Homeopathy
  • Breastfeeding
  • Public health
  • Informed consent method
  • Solutions to a wide range of chronic health conditions: chronic pain, insomnia, depression, and 'disorders'

 

Mrs Elizabeth Taylor Buck
e.taylor-buck@sheffield.ac.uk

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

My research interests are in child and adolescent mental health and interventions that focus on the relationship between child and caregiver. In 2009 I was awarded an NIHR Clinical Doctoral Research Fellowship. I used a mixed methods design to create an online manual of dyadic art therapy.

Research Methods I can Supervise

  • Mixed Methods
  • Manual Development

Specific Areas of Interest

  • Child and adolescent mental health
  • Parent-child interventions
  • Parenting interventions
  • Early years 
  • Art therapy
Professor Frank Birkin
F.Birkin@Sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research Interests

I have both developed and applied my theoretical understanding in new practical management and accounting tools for sustainable development. For example, I won £300k+ European Union funding for an international project to develop a first account of the sustainable development performance of island tourism, Sustainable Tourism’s Environmental Protection System (STEPS) for islands. Also in close collaboration with Sheffield University’s Department of Civil Engineering, a team of environmental accounts of which I was a leading member have won over £1 million from the EPSRC for a series of projects relating to fresh and grey water management in the UK. My research has been published in wide-ranging international journals from Critical Perspectives on Accounting and the British Accounting Review to Business Strategy and the Environment and the International Journal of World Ecology and Sustainable Development. Recognition of my work has resulted in several international key-note speaker invitations, an invitation from the European Commission to participate in the development of a proposed service-sector eco-label and the co-hosting of a European conference on sustainable tourism in Venice with guest speakers from the European Commission, the United Nations Environment Programme, World Tourism Organisation, World Wide Fund for Nature as well as the national Italian environmental agency.

PhD Supervision:

  • Environmental and Social Accounting
  • Environmental Management Accounting
  • Accounting for Sustainable Development
  • Episteme change analysis
Professor Val Gillet
v.gillet@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Information School

Research interests

My research interests focus on:

  • the development and application of chemoinformatics techniques that are used primarily in the design of novel bioactive compounds.
  • data mining and machine learning methods including emerging pattern mining, multiobjective evolutionary algorithms and graph theory.

Particular application areas include the identification of structure-activity relationships, toxicity prediction, 3D similarity methods and the de novo design of novel compounds. I also have expertise in developing novel representation methods for chemical structures with recent areas including reduced graphs, wavelet analysis and reaction vectors.

Dr Megan Blake
M.Blake@Sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Geography

Research interests

  • Urban food systems, social practices and social institutions (e.g., market practices, food justice, urban farming, food consumption, supermarketisation, social aspects of the design of food systems) in the global north.
  • Practices and circuits of value and valuing
  • Food waste and food surplus
  • Food poverty
  • Community food resilience
  • Geographies of Everyday life
  • Local food debates
  • Political Ecology 

Public engagment is an important aspect of my approach to research. See also: Http://geofoodie.org

About Megan

In 2014 I developed the MA in Food Security and Food Justice at the University of Sheffield. Our first intake of students was in 2015 (you can read students' work on our blog http://foodsecurityfoodjustice.com).  Including food justice in the title of the program was important to me, because I am committed to the idea that unless we make a way for our food system to be fairer, there will always be food insecurity for the poor and there will always be systematic food insecurity for certain groups, even in countries that are considered wealthy.  I work primarily in the global north using ethnographic and qualitative methodologies, but not exclusively so.  I am astrong believer in working with communities and community organisations, listening to the experiences of those at the sharp end of food insecurity, and recognising the skills and knowledges of those who are making do and getting by in a system where they are at a disadvantage.  I am part of the Sheffield City Council Food Group, Doncaster Anti-obesity group, and the Oxfam/Greater Manchester Poverty Action --Food Poverty Group.  I have supervised 13 PhD students (8 completed, 4 ongoing).


Professor Nicholas Williams
n.h.williams@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemistry

Research Interests

Our research can be broadly described as physical organic chemistry. This is the design, synthesis and systematic study of (mainly) organic molecules. The molecules we are interested in designing are ones which either show fundamental insights into mechanisms, reactivity, recognition and/or catalysis, or exploit the understanding we have to create more complex supramolecular systems. Practically, we think at the molecular level (designing organic molecules with key structural features), make them (organic synthesis), and finally discover how well they function by carefully examining their properties.

Currently, we have several main strands of investigation:Enzymes are remarkably efficient catalysts, operating under mild aqueous conditions; as man made efforts to achieve similar activity are many orders of magnitude less efficient, there is still a great deal that we do not understand. We are investigating well defined model compounds to understand how to combine several functional groups so that they work really effectively together. This helps give a deeper understanding of biological catalysis, and guides us in designing our own biomimetic catalysts. Organic ligands which can bind and control the reactivity of metal ions provide the best catalysts to date, and form the core of our models and catalysts.

We are applying the discovery that individual components of a catalyst can be brought together to achieve cooperative catalysis (i.e. the whole is more effective than the sum of the parts!) towards creating supramolecular systems which can be controlled by recognition processes. This is the type of event which takes place in signalling at cell surfaces, and we are making transmembrane signalling systems which mimic this. As well as these larger systems, which involve many weak interactions, we are exploring molecular cages, which are held together by stronger interaction to make more well defined structures that are capable of binding and catalysing the reactions of substrates selectively.

Keywords:

Physical organic chemistry, biological chemistry. Mechanism, reactivity, and catalysis, especially relevant to organic chemistry, supramolecular chemistry, and biology. Functional supramolecular systems.

Dr Panayiota Alevizou
P.J.Alevizou@Sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Panayiotas’ research interests include: sustainability marketing, labelling, green identity, green branding of FMCGs, branding in the music industry and qualitative research methods.

She is interested in supervising students in various areas of sustainability marketing.

Dr Matthew Bacon
M.Bacon@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Law
Research interests and areas of supervision
  • Policing (in particular the occupational culture of the police, criminal investigation and covert policing practices)
  • Illegal drug markets and drug control policy
  • The informal economy
  • Qualitative research methods
Dr Jennifer Burr
j.a.burr@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Broad area of interest:

  • Sociology of health and illness

Research methods I am able to supervise:

  • Qualitative

Specific areas of interest:

  • Reproductive technology
  • Research ethics
  • Gender and sexuality
Professor Stephen Goodacre
S.Goodacre@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

My research interests are clinical trials in emergency medicine, economic analysis, the organisation of emergency care and methods for evaluating the quality of emergency care.

Dr Michael Mangan
m.mangan@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Computer Science

My group uses bio-robotic methods to investigate how animals solve complex problems such as navigation before abstracting lessons learned to solve engineering goals. 

To reveal how animals function we utilise methods from computational neuroscience, behavioural ecology, graphics, information theory, computer vision, machine learning, and robotics disciplines. 

We then use more standard robotic and engineering methods to apply lessons to specific problem areas including robot controllers, novel sensing, and new methods of AI and machine learning inspired by natural intelligence.  We celebrate this truly multidisciplinary approach which we find both stimulating and challenging. 

Therefore we welcome exceptional candidates from across fields but those with strong backgrounds in mathematical, physical sciences and engineering disciplines (including computer science and computational neuroscience) are particularly well suited to research in my group.  

Dr Jane McKeown
j.mckeown@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Nursing and Midwifery
Health Sciences School

My research interests are the care and involvement of people who have dementia and I am interested in research methods that enable people’s ‘voices to be heard’.

Dr Rachel Smith
rachel.smith@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Research interests
  • Wet granulation design and scale-up
  • DEM/CFD modelling of particulate processes
  • Drug delivery methods
  • Biological and water systems modelling
Dr Adam Stanovic
a.j.stansbie@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Music
Research interests
  • Electroacoustic/acousmatic music (composition and performance)
  • Analysis of electronic music (methods and works)
  • Aesthetics of contemporary music
  • Philosophy of sound/music (particularly musical ontology and phenomenology)
Mr Robert Akparibo
R.Akparibo@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Broad area of research interest:

  • International Health planning and management
  • Nutrition
  • Maternal and child health
  • Primary health care

 

Methods I am able to supervise:

  • Qualitative
  • Quantitative
  • Mixed Methods

 

Specific areas of interest:

  • Health literacy
  • Undernutrition
  • Infant and young child nutrition/feeding
  • Micronutrients
  • Evaluation of interventions on any area regarding nutrition
  • Maternal and child health
  • Primary health care in developing countries
  • Health planning and management
Dr Richard Cooper
richard.cooper@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
The Medical School
Department of Sociological Studies
 
Research interests
  • Pharmacy
  • Non-medical prescribing
  • Addiction
  • Empirical and normative ethics in healthcare 
  • Medicine supply (prescribed and over the counter) and misuse/abuse (over the counter, illicit)
  • Medical sociology
  • Public Health

Methods

  • Qualitative (interviews, observation, ethnography, content analysis, narrative)
  • Mixed methods (questionnaires, secondary data analysis)
Dr Berna Keskin
b.keskin@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Urban Studies and Planning

Research interests

My research interests focus on understanding the structure of urban housing markets and specifically exploring the relative merits of different approaches to capturing neighbourhood segmentation within house price models by using quantitative methods. My research adopts a variety of econometric methods to the analysis of property markets by investigating the effectiveness of different modelling techniques at capturing housing market segmentation.

Professor Sarah Salway
s.salway@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Broad area of research interest: 

  • Health inequalities
  • Gender
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Poverty
  • Reproductive health
  • Work and health
  • South Asia

Research methods I am able to supervise:

  • Qualitative
  • Quantitative or mixed methods
  • Participatory and inclusive research approaches

Specific areas of interest:

  • UK South Asian populations
  • Intersecting inequalities
  • Complex interventions
  • Knowledge translation
Professor Sarah Salway
s.salway@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Broad area of research interest: 

  • Health inequalities
  • Gender
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Poverty
  • Reproductive health
  • Work and health
  • South Asia

Research methods I am able to supervise:

  • Qualitative
  • Quantitative or mixed methods
  • Participatory and inclusive research approaches

Specific areas of interest:

  • UK South Asian populations
  • Intersecting inequalities
  • Complex interventions
  • Knowledge translation
Dr Layla Skinns
law@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Law

Research Interests

  • The police custody process
  • Police and policing
  • The role of the law in policing
  • Police legitimacy
  • Multi-agency criminal justice partnerships
  • Crime prevention and community safety
  • Restorative justice in schools
  • The relationship between drugs and crime
  • Mixed-methods research

Areas of Research Supervision

  • The police custody process
  • Police and policing
  • The role of the law in policing
  • Police legitimacy
  • Multi-agency criminal justice partnerships
  • Crime prevention and community safety
  • Mixed-methods research
Professor Alan Brennan
a.brennan@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My fundamental interest is in mathematical modelling approaches to inform decision making in health and healthcare.

I have been heavily involved in health technology assessment and health economic evaluation of pharmaceuticals and interventions for both government bodies in the UK e.g NICE and internationally and also with pharmaceutical industry.

More recently I have engaged in a series of projects around wider behavioural and public health related modelling.

  • Use of modelling and data analysis to assess broader interventions
  • Assessing cost-effectiveness of new treatments for NICE
  • Bayesian methods in cost-effectiveness analysis to inform future research priorities (CHEBS)
  • Value of information and Bayesian methods to inform research priorities
  • Cost effectiveness modelling methods
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Diabetes, obesity, CHD Modelling
  • Pharmaco-economics
    - Alzheimer's
    - Renal disease
  • Health systems modelling
    - Cervical screening
    - Ambulance services
    - Re-engineering
Dr Lei Chen
l.chen@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research Interests

Lei's research interests cover a range of topics, including intangible measurement, management and disclosure, corporate social responsibility, financial institutions and financial markets. She is also interested in research methods, particularly focusing on the development of mixed methods in accounting and management research.

Areas of Research Supervision

Lei is interested in supervising PhD students in the areas of financial reporting, social and environmental reporting, corporate social responsibility, and banking (with particular reference to China and other developing countries). She is also keen to supervise PhD students who conduct interdisciplinary projects using mixed methods.

 

Publications

He, L;, Chen, L; and Liu, F.H. (2017). Banking reforms, performance and risk in China. Applied Economics, 49(40) 3995-4012.

Chen, L., Danbolt, J. and Holland, J. (2014). Rethinking bank business models: the role of intangibles. Accounting, Auditing and Accountability Journal, 27(3) 563-589.

Full list of publications

Dr Nicholas Latimer
n.latimer@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My research interests focus on economic evaluation methodology, with a particular emphasis on the incorporation of survival analysis within economic models. My doctoral and post-doctoral research has focused primarily on methods for adjusting survival estimates in the presence of treatment switching - that is, when patients in the control group of a clinical trial switch onto the experimental treatment, thus confounding estimates of the treatment effect (where the relevant question for an economic analysis is what would have happened if control group patients did not receive this experimental treatment). Adjustment methods are primarily from the causal inference literature, and I have a related interest in the use of causal inference methods to estimate comparative effectiveness from registry datasets, particularly in the area of cancer.


Dr Michaela Rogers
m.rogers@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Primarily I am a qualitative researcher with an interest in narrative but I have experience of managing mixed methods projects too. I am interested in all things that concern equality and social justice in relation to my practice discipline of social work and social care, but my main research interests and research lie in the following areas:

  • interpersonal and gender-based violence (including intimate partner violence, elder abuse, domestic homicide, child abuse, and other forms of family violence);
  • gender, trans and gender diversity;
  • hidden voices and marginalised communities;
  • narrative methods.

I am also interested in, and would welcome applications, concerning:

  • Identity and belonging;
  • A sociology of family, family practices and identity;
  • Hate crime;
  • Stalking and harassment;
  • Digital methods, abuse, stalking and harassment;
Professor Michail Balikhin
m.balikhin@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering

Research interests:

  • Space Plasma
  • Turbulence in high beta (hot) plasma
  • Collisionless Shocks
  • Avalanching Systems
  • Space Weather
  • Solar-Terrestrial Relations
  • Spacecraft Instrumentation
  • Nonlinear Systems
  • Identification of linear and non-linear processes in data
  • Methods of data analysis for multi-spacecraft missions.
Dr Samantha Caton
s.caton@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Broad area of research interest:

  • Obesity
  • Appetite regulation
  • Nutrition

 

Research methods I am able to supervise:

  • Quantitative

 

Specific areas of interest:

  • Infant feeding behaviour
  • Promotion of healthful diets in pre-school children
  • Effect of alcohol on appetite and body weight regulation
Dr Enrico Dall'Ara
e.dallara@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism

Research Interests

My research interests are related to better understanding bone mechanics and remodelling with imaging, experimental and computational methods.

In particular the main goal of my research is to develop and validate computational models for the prediction of bone strength and risk of fracture in healthy and disease, applied to both preclinical and clinical studies.

Dr Jaime Delgadillo
j.delgadillo@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of Psychology

My clinical interests are in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for depression, anxiety and addiction problems. My research primarily focuses on the development of methods to predict and prevent poor treatment outcomes (i.e. dropout, persistent distress after therapy, relapse) and to optimally match patients to specific interventions.

Dr Peter Dodd
p.j.dodd@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

  • Infectious disease modelling.
  • The epidemiology of TB, particularly in settings with high-HIV prevalence, and population-level TB interventions.
  • TB in children.
  • Individual-based modelling methodologies.
  • Methods for model calibration and uncertainty analysis.
Professor Nicholas Fox
n.j.fox@sheffield.ac.uk

School of Health and Related Research

Broad Area of Research Interest:

  • Sociology of Health and Illness
  • Sexualities
  • Environment
  • Embodiment

 Research Methods I can Supervise:

  • Qualitative
  • Materialist

Specific Areas of Research Interest:

  • New materialism
  • Creativity
  • Environment
  • Sexuality
  • Health
Professor Andrea Genovese
a.genovese@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

  • Facility Location Problems: models, methods, applications
  • Applications of Spatial Interaction theory
  • Multi-Criteria Decision Making problems
  • Decision Support Models for Logistics Problems
  • Green logistics and low carbon innovation for Supply Chains
Professor Maria Grasso
m.grasso@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Politics and International Relations
Research interests
  • Radicalism, social movements and protest
  • Political participation and disengagement
  • Young people's political participation
  • Political socialisation and political generations
  • Social/political attitudes and value change
  • Cross-national research
  • Survey research and quantitative methods
  • Political sociology of industrial democracies
Professor Kirill Horoshenkov
k.horoshenkov@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

Professor Horoshenkov’s main research interests are in novel sensors for water industry, novel acoustic materials and material characterisation methods. His other area of work relates to noise control, audio-visual interactions and design of nature-inspired noise control solutions.

Professor Derek Ingham
d.ingham@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Professor Derek Ingham is an applied mathematician who has worked on a wide variety of engineering and industrial mathematical problems in collaboration with numerous engineering scientists and with several industries and acted as an Expert Witness. He has published research papers with members of staff in all the engineering and environment departments, and several science and medical departments. At present he supervises 15 PhD students and has successfully supervised over 100 PhD students. Further he is on the editorial board of 12 international journals, has written 16 research books, over 900 research papers in referred journals and over 40 confidential industrial reports. He has received funding from over 70 different organizations.

In particular, he has research interests in energy:  wind energy, fuel cells; heat and fluid flows: flows in porous media, ill-proposed problems, cementing of oil castings, proppant transport in  fractures, Stirling Engines, heating of oils and in ship holds. Carbon capture and storage. Environment: ventilation, fume cupboards, sampling, aerosols, filtration, gravity currents, atomisers, blowing snow. Computational Fluid Dynamics: Finite volume methods, finite element methods, Lattice Boltzman methods, boundary element methods. Turbulence. Boundary layer theory.

Professor Suzanne Mason
s.mason@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My research interests relate to the evaluation of complex interventions and systems in emergency care settings. I have extensive experience in multi-centre mixed methods studies which can directly inform the delivery of high quality emergency care to patients.

Professor Claudia Mazza
c.mazza@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering
Research interests

Claudia's research has always been focused on human movement Biomechanics and on the definition of quantative methods for the clinical assessment of an individual locomotor and postural ability.

  • Biomechanics
  • Gait analysis
  • Technologies for human movement analysis
  • Personalised musculoskeletal modelling
  • Wearable inertial sensors
  • Activity monitoring
Dr Nasrin Nasr
N.Nasr@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My research experience and interests are:
• Interdisciplinary research
• Qualitative research particularly Narrative inquiry
• Using Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs)
• Examining Response Shift theory in the measurement of change
• User-centred design methods and experience-based approach
• Evaluating complex health interventions

Ms Katie Powell
K.Powell@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Broad areas of research interest:

  • Health Inequalities

Research Methods I am able to supervise:

  • Qualitative

Specific areas of interest:

  • Community development/engagement
  • Voluntary sector
  • Geographical areas of deprivation
  • Health improvement initiatives
  • Social exclusion
Dr Angela Sorsby
A.Sorsby@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Law

Research Interests

  • Evaluating initiatives
  • Restorative justice
  • Probation supervision
  • Desistance from crime
  • Training of criminal justice practitioners

Member of the Centre for Criminological Research.

Areas of Research Supervision

  • Quantitate research methods and statistics
  • Restorative justice
  • Probation supervision
  • Desistance from crime
  • Training of criminal justice practitioners
Professor William Zimmerman
w.zimmerman@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Research interests
  • Energy efficient generation of microbubbles and their applications (particularly biofuels and bioreactors)
  • Plasma microreactors, especially low power consumption generation of ozone
  • Fluid dynamics of helical turbulence and mixing
  • Thin film dynamics and microrheometry
  • Computational modelling with inverse methods
Dr Robert Barthorpe
r.j.barthorpe@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

Dr Barthorpe's research covers a range of problems in the field of structural dynamics and beyond, with an underlying theme being the integration of numerical modelling and experimental data. Structural health monitoring is one of his major research themes. The broad aim of an SHM system is to be able to identify, at an early stage, occurrences of damage that may ultimately lead to the failure of the component or system being monitored.

Established approaches to this task typically fall into one of two categories: they are either based entirely on experimental data, or make use of a numerical model that is periodically updated as new data becomes available. Both of these approaches have distinct drawbacks: for the former, lack of appropriate experimental data is the major issue; for the latter, model-form uncertainty is among the challenges faced.

Part of Rob's work is in investigating ways to circumvent the lack of data problem through novel experimental and data-modelling techniques. A larger part is in developing new methods for integrating experimental and numerical methods, such that uncertainty in both the experimental measurements and the numerical model may be accounted for.

These methods are being developed for application to aerospace structures, wind turbines and civil infrastructure. However, the domain of applicability is much broader as the issues of handling uncertainty, solving inverse problems and overcoming test-model discrepancy are pervasive in many branches of science and engineering. Applications being investigated include the energy performance of buildings and the modelling of human bones.

Professor Keith Worden
K.Worden@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

Keith's research is concerned with applications of advanced signal processing and machine learning methods to structural dynamics. The primary application is in the aerospace industry, although there has also been interaction with ground transport and offshore industries.

One of the research themes concerns non-linear systems. The research conducted here is concerned with assessing the importance of non-linear modelling within a given context and formulating appropriate methods of analysis. The analysis of non-linear systems can range from the fairly pragmatic to the extremes of mathematical complexity. The emphasis within the research group here is on the pragmatic and every attempt is made to maintain contact with engineering necessity.

Another major activity within the research group concerns structural health monitoring for aerospace systems and structures. The research is concerned with developing automated systems for inspection and diagnosis, with a view to reducing the cost-of-ownership of these high integrity structures. The methods used are largely adapted from pattern recognition and machine learning; often the algorithms make use of biological concepts e.g. neural networks, genetic algorithms and ant-colony metaphors. The experimental approaches developed range from global inspection using vibration analysis to local monitoring using ultrasound.

Dr Jonathan Dickson
j.m.dickson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Academic Unit of Medical Education
School of Health and Related Research

I am an academic GP.  My special interests are neurology, epilepsy and psychogenic non-epileptic seizures.  Major themes in my research are improving emergency care for people after a seizure and the use of free-association narrative interviews to give new insights into psychogenic non-epileptic seizures. All of my research is about health-service quality improvement, my personal methodological expertise is in quantitative methods but I work in multi-disciplinary research teams using mixed methods to develop and test complex interventions. 

I am very happy to receive informal enquiries.  Feel free to get in touch by email.  

My web profile is avaiable via this link:

https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/medicine/research/aupmc/staff/academicprofiles/jmdickson

 

Dr Frank Hopfgartner
f.hopfgartner@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Information School

Research interests

My main research interests are:

  • Interactive Information Systems such as information retrieval, knowledge sharing, enterprise search, and recommender systems.
  • Experience in user modelling, gamification, personalized search and recommendation, user-centric evaluation, and other challenges that center around satisfying users’ information needs.

Research supervision

Some potential project ideas are: 

Document Analysis: Automatic information extraction, indexing, semantic analysis of text documents, analysis of low-level multimedia features, and the application of deep learning methods to classify multimedia content. Manual methods include work on engaging the crowd for data and document annotation and categorization.

Self-tracking & lifelogging and its potentials for personalization. Interested in the analysis, and visualisation of sensor and lifelogging data. Other challenges pertain processing vast amounts of data and identifying user interests, skills etc. and their usage in real world systems like health or recommendation systems.

Professor Simon Jones
simon.jones@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemistry

Research Interests

Methods for Asymmetric Synthesis

A major theme of a majority of my research is the development of new ways to construct molecules in a controlled and selective fashion. We have established innovative methods based on chiral anthracene templates, organocatalysts and organo-boron and phosphorus species.

Construction of Molecular Probes of Biologically Active Molecules

A number of projects are underway that involve the synthesis of new, functional molecules that can be used to probe biochemical pathways. Current projects involve the development of new magnetic imaging contrast agents, fluorescent probes based upon fatty acids and bisphosphonates, and 13C labeled anti-cancer agents for use in dynamic nuclear polarisation studies.

Synthesis of Biologically Active Molecules

Several projects are underway involving the design, synthesis, and biological testing of molecules that could be used as potential novel anti-inflammatory agents and antibiotics. Another project is similarly looking at ways to develop a new herbicide.

Dr Kirill Mackenzie
K.Mackenzie@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

I work in differential geometry - Lie algebroids, Poisson geometry, connection theory, double and multiple structures. Most of my work at present involves aspects of multiple Lie algebroids. In the same way that a Lie algebroid generalizes the notion of tangent bundle, multiple Lie algebroids abstract the notion of higher-order tangent bundles. Despite their complexity, these objects are more tractable than other approaches to higher-order differential geometry: in place of, for example, a second-order jet bundle or a Courant algebroid, a double Lie algebroid has two simple bracket structures, the relations between which embody the second-order features. 

Lie algebroids are intimately related to Poisson structures and none of my recent work would have been achieved without the use of Poisson methods. Reciprocally, Lie algebroid and double Lie algebroid methods are allowing difficult questions involving Poisson groupoid actions to be resolved in a simple and conceptual fashion. 

Dr Andrew Nowakowski
a.f.nowakowski@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

Andrew's research interests are in the area of aerodynamics, multi-component and multi-phase flows. In all these categories, the work aims to construct the algorithms for determining approximate solutions of relevant flow problems. Then, numerical methods are analysed and computer codes implementing the algorithms are developed, first for the purpose of showing the efficacy of the discretization methods and ultimately, to solve problems of practical interest.

The developed numerical technique based on vortex method was used to compute hydrodynamic forces for the flow past a rotating body. Andrew's group created a novel approach for calculation of the flow problem in hydrocyclones and developed its own specialist finite element software package, which was used to calculate the three-dimensional incompressible flow in complex geometries. Most recently, a computational simulation of two-phase compressible flow has been proposed for safety analysis of chemical reactors. The approach taken in this research enables the resolution of multi-phase mixtures and interface problems between compressible fluids.

Dr Mark Tomlinson
mark.tomlinson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Research interests

  • Poverty and deprivation (measurement and impacts)
  • Labour markets, skills and training
  • Innovation systems and the learning economy
  • The relationships between social, innovation and industrial policy
  • Socio-economic indicators
  • Advanced multivariate methods (such as Structural Equation Models, panel regression, neural networks)

I am an interdisciplinary scholar having worked in economics, management, innovation studies and sociology over the past two decades. My main interests at the moment are in labour processes and labour market disdvantage (which includes skills, learning, organisational effects on human capital development, and the contribution labour makes to innovation systems etc). I also have a strong interest in poverty research in general.

I broadly follow an economic sociological approach and use quantitative methods. I also try to apply my research to the real world in terms of policy development.

Dr Parveen Ali
parveen.ali@sheffield.ac.uk

Nursing and Midwifery
Health Sciences School

I am a mixed method researcher and equally use qualitative as well as quantitative methods.  I am interested in exploring gender based violence, especially intimate partner violence from the perspective of victims and perpetrators.  I am also interested in exploring health, consanguinity and genetics, and inequalities in health care experiences and health outcomes and how the reparation and training of health professionals such as doctors, nurses and allied health professionals can contribute to tackling such inequalities.

Dr Steven Ariss
S.Ariss@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

Methods:


• Realist (and other ‘theory led’) Evaluations of Programmes and Complex Interventions 
• Conversion Analysis & Ethnomethodology
• Mixed and Qualitative Research Methods

Topics of Interest:

• Health Service Organisation and Delivery
• Interdisciplinary Team-Working
• Organisational change management
• Implementation and knowledge transfer
• Use of technology in healthcare (for service development and evaluation)
• Health Care Interactions and Relationships
• Self-Management of Chronic and Long-Term Conditions
• Older People's Community Health Services

Dr Paul Armitage
p.armitage@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease
The Medical School

Research interests

My primary research interest is in the development of post-processing methods for quantification of MRI data. In particular, for techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, arterial spin labelling, image registration, MR signal modelling and their application to stroke, brain tumours, epilepsy and small vessel disease. My imaging interests span the entire age range from the foetus through to the ageing population.

Dr Gianna Ayala
g.ayala@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Archaeology

Research interests:

My research interests are wide reaching and focus on the integration of different analytical methods. I work predominately in the Mediterranean but have worked all over the world, including Britain, Croatia, Greece, Italy, Turkey and Argentina.

  • Geoarchaeology (landscape and on-site investigations)
  • Italian and Mediterranean prehistory
  • Landscape archaeology and field survey techniques
  • Contemporary archaeology
Dr Andrew Bell
andrew.j.d.bell@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield Methods Institute

Before moving to Sheffield, Andy was a lecturer at the University of Bristol, where he also completed his undergraduate degree (in Geography) and PhD (in Advanced Quantitative Methods). His current substantive research focuses on mental health from a life course perspective, but also spans a diverse range of other subject areas, including geography, political science, social epidemiology and economics. Methodologically, Andy’s interests are in the development and application of multilevel models, with work focusing on age-period-cohort analysis and fixed and random effects models

Dr Mark Bryan
m.l.bryan@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of Economics

Mark is interested in supervising PhD students in variety of topics in empirical labour studies including:

  • wage inequality (trends and causes)
  • consequences of the ageing workforce
  • trends in the amount and timing of work and their implications
  • the impacts of labour market institutions such as the minimum wage
  • the impact of labour market experiences on wellbeing
  • econometric and statistical methods for describing and analysing labour market outcomes
Dr Roy Chaudhuri
r.chaudhuri@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology

Research Interests:

Bacterial genomics.  Current research topics include:

  • Comparative genomics and phylogenetics of bacterial pathogens, particularly E. coli and Salmonella
  • Use of transposon insertion sequencing methods (TraDIS/TnSeq/HITS/InSeq) to identify essential bacterial genes and genes important for survival in particular environments such as during infection of a model system
  • Development of user-friendly software tools and online resources for exploring data from -omics technologies. Examples include coliBASE, Xbase and the recently-funded MicrobesNG.
Dr Thomas Clark
t.clark@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Research interests

My main research interests are in the broad areas of research methodology, novel applications of social theory, and sport. More specifically, I am interested in the utility of social research and the impact of being researched; the ethics of social research; secondary research methods; methodological innovation; and, the sociology of lower league football. Currently, I am attempting to utilise novel sources of data in order to explore the sociology of evil. I am also interested in the sociology of deception, in all of its various disguises.

Dr Helen Colley
h.colley@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is the 6th most common cancers worldwide. The survival rate for head and neck cancer is poor. This is largely due to late diagnosis and a lack of effective therapeutic agents.


My particular research interest is in the development of multi-cellular three dimensional in vitro models of the oral mucosa in health and disease. My current research utilises these models to develop; new methods of detecting oral pre-cancer, novel drugs to treat oral cancer and new modes of drug delivery systems.

Mr Lee Crookes
l.crookes@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Urban Studies and Planning

Research interests

Positioning myself as a critical geographer/planner, I am interested in using qualitative methods to explore contemporary issues related to housing, class, gentrification, urban regeneration and associated conflicts over the meaning and use of space.

Within the context of a broad ambition to develop an understanding of planning ‘from below’, I am keen to extend and develop the focus of gentrification research from displacement to matters of emplacement whilst further examining the politics and geography of ‘home’, attachment to place and the personal and social costs of displacement.

Professor Simon Dixon
s.dixon@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Broad area of research interests:

  • Health economics
  • Economic evaluation

Methods I am able to supervise:

  • Economic evaluation
  • Preference elicitation

Specific area of research interests: 

  • Economic evaluation alongside controlled trials
  • Valuation of non-health outcomes
  • Process utility
  • Willingness to pay methodology
  • Decison rules for reimbursement
  • Transferability of economic evaluations
  • Global Health
Professor Steve Fotios
s.fotios@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Architecture

Research of lighting and human factors: how do variations in light (the amount, colour, and spatial distribution) affect perception of the environment and task performance? Currently I focus on lighting for pedestrians and cyclists.

Research methodology: in subjective evaluations, how do the question and the experimental design influence the response gained in an experiment? Was Poulton correct that all subjective quantative judgements are erroneous or misleading?

I have supervised 14 PhD students to completion and set up LumeNet, the annual research methods symposium for PhD students of lighting.

 

Dr Pankaj Garg
p.garg@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease

My research interests are in multi-parametric cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging especially tissue mapping and four-dimensional flow CMR. I am interested in standardisation, validation and in the development of image-based, post-processing methods of 4D flow CMR for clinical applications. My current work is focused on developing 4D flow models to accurately predict cardiovascular haemodynamics and develop novel therapeutic targets in heart disease patients

Professor Thomas Hain
t.hain@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Computer Science

Research interests

Thomas' research interests cover many areas in natural language processing, speech, audio and multimedia technology, machine learning, and complex system optimisation and design.

His interests include: large vocabulary continuous speech recognition, non-linear methods in speech processing, low bit-rate speech coding, machine learning, multi-modal systems, image classification, microphone arrays, system and resource optimisation.

Dr Janet Harris
janet.harris@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Research interests
  • community-based participatory approaches to improving health care services, with a particular focus on health inequalities.
  • social constructions of health and illness in the context of access to health care and employment policy
  • effectiveness of different approaches to teaching and learning in terms of promoting work-based skills and evidence based practice
  • mixed methods evaluation research
  • realist evaluation and realist synthesis
Dr Monica Hernandez
monica.hernandez@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My main research interests lie in microeconometrics, the analysis of micro level data on the economic behaviour of individuals. I am also interested in more general model and methods development to analyse individual level data showing nonstandard characteristics. Recent examples include analysis of health state utility data, health and life satisfaction, the economics of illicit behaviour, the dynamics of children developmental outcomes and applications to individuals’ decisions to participate in welfare programmes.

Professor Rodney Hose
d.r.hose@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease
The Medical School

Research interests

My research interests are in the development of methods and workflows for the computational analysis of (primarily) cardiovascular systems, and in their translation to clinical application. I am interested in all aspects of the process, from clinical data collection and management through image processing to build detailed three dimensional models of the vasculature and on to determination of appropriate boundary conditions, numerical solution and data reduction. I have been intimately involved in the development of the European Commission´s Virtual Physiological Human initiative from its beginning.

Dr Georges Kesserwani
g.kesserwani@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

Research interests

Dr Kesserwani current research interests revolve around:

  • Hybrid mesh-based/mesh-less numerical methods for solving conservations laws
  • Integrated river flow modelling on mobile bed with sediment transport and vegetation
  • Multi-layer coastal flow modelling with application to tsunamis
  • Integrated hydrological and flood modelling at multiple scales
  • High-performance computing and Multi-Agent-based systems


Dr Vitaveska Lanfranchi
v.lanfranchi@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Computer Science

Her research has a fundamental interdisciplinary nature, and has developed both in industry and in academia. It concerns the intersection among ubiquitous computing, knowledge capture and visualization and human computer interaction in fields as diverse emergency response, mobility, smart cities, manufacturing, aerospace and more recently wellbeing. Her research focuses on user participatory design methods to develop novel methodologies and interfaces for ubiquitous and mobile computing.

Professor Zoe Marshman
z.marshman@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Research interests

My main interest is child-centred dental research to increase understanding of the impact of oral health and dental care on children and young people. My work involves inclusive research with children with the aim of informing policy and clinical practice.

I co-ordinate the Children and Young People Oral Health Research Group, a multidisciplinary team conducting research with children using a range of research methods

Dr Andrew Narracott
a.j.narracott@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease
The Medical School

Research interests

My research interest is the application of numerical techniques to the study of cardiovascular systems, with development of associated experimental validation methods. Application areas include coronary artery stenting, native and prosthetic valve function and venous haemodynamics. Such applications cover a range of technical areas including structural mechanics, Computational Fluid Dynamics, Fluid-Structure Interaction and multi-scale approaches for biological systems.

Professor Glenys Parry
G.D.Parry@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My interests include the application of research to policy and practice, service evaluation, process and outcomes of psychotherapy in health service settings and psychotherapeutic competence.

Recent research includes an evaluation of the new model of psychological service delivery "Improving Access to Psychological Therapies" and an investigation into research-based methods of improving the quality and effectiveness of psychological services for people with long term depression.

Dr Philip Powell
p.a.powell@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of Economics

Combining a career in psychology and economics, Philip's research interests are in understanding behaviour, well-being, and decision-making through multidisciplinary approaches. He is an expert in behavioural and experimental economics, and has particular interest in the role of emotions in decision-making and psychological well-being processes. Philip is currently Research Fellow on the “InsEAD-EX: A mobile experimental economics portal (the ‘lab-in-a-bag’)”, which seeks to develop the Department’s capacity for experimental methods and multidisciplinary collaboration.

Dr Pierre Ricco
p.ricco@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

Pierre's research focuses on fluid mechanics and he has used experimental, numerical and theoretical techniques. He has been interested in turbulent drag reduction by moving surfaces (spanwise wall oscillations and traveling waves), and in boundary-layer transition to turbulence induced by free-stream perturbations. 

  • Turbulent drag reduction
  • Bypass transition to turbulence
  • Klebanoff modes in laminar boundary layers
  • Effect of free-stream disturbances on laminar boundary layers
  • Receptivity of Tollmien-Schlichting waves
  • Perturbation methods in applied mathematics


Dr Peter Rockett
p.rockett@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering

Research interests

  • Multi-objective genetic programming, particularly for feature extraction in machine learning and data mining
  • Pattern recognition/machine learning, particularly unified methods for training large margin classifiers
  • Quantitative analysis of X-ray angiograms for diagnosis/treatment of occlusive vascular disease
  • Data mining of medical databases: Classification and regression
  • Knowledge discovery in process control


Dr Sarah Spencer
sarah.spencer@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Human Communication Sciences (old code)
Research interests
  • Interventions and evidence-based practice for developmental speech, language and communication difficulties
  • Including service-users in developing, designing and evaluating interventions
  • Speech and language difficulties of older children and adolescents
  • Working in contexts of 'social disadvantage'
  • Facilitation of effective collaborations with education and families
  • Sociolinguistics and speech and language therapy
  • Service-level evaluation
  • Identity and language, particularly related to a) social class; b) adolescence; and/or c) speech, language and communication difficulties.
  • Qualitative and mixed research methods
Dr Eleanor Stillman
E.C.Stillman@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

My main research interests lie in the practical application of statistics to geology and materials science. A long term concern has been the modelling of particle size, with investigations into its relationship with sediment transport processes and strength of composite materials. Other recent projects include the use of classification methods in pollen analysis, the design of resistant glazes and the production of computer-assisted-learning materials.

Dr Eleanor Stillman
E.C.Stillman@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Probability and Statistics

Research interests

My main research interests lie in the practical application of statistics to geology and materials science. A long term concern has been the modelling of particle size, with investigations into its relationship with sediment transport processes and strength of composite materials. Other recent projects include the use of classification methods in pollen analysis, the design of resistant glazes and the production of computer-assisted-learning materials.

Professor Andrew Tyas
a.tyas@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

Research interests

Dr Tyas is head of the blast and impact research group in the Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, managing the testing laboratory at Harpur Hill, Buxton where research into blast physics and the response of structures to rapid dynamic loading is conducted. He is also a Director of Blastech Ltd, a University spin-out company offering consultancy and commercial testing services to industry in the field of blast and impact loading of structures. Additionally, he collaborates with Dr Matthew Gilbert in the development of computational optimisation-based methods for the design of structures. 

Professor Eleni Vasilaki
e.vasilaki@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Computer Science

Research interests: Computational Neuroscience, Neuromorphic Engineering, Machine Learning

As a Computational Scientist and Engineer with extensive cross disciplinary experience, I contribute to the understanding of the brain’s learning principles. My team and I take inspiration from these principles to design novel, machine learning techniques, and in particular reinforcement learning methods.  We develop data analytics frameworks for neuroscientists, and we also work closely with engineers from other disciplines to design hardware that computes in a brain-like manner.  

Professor Stephen Walters
s.j.walters@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Research interests
Dr Kevin Walters
k.walters@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

My research interests are in the application and development of (mostly Bayesian) statistical methods to identify disease-causing DNA variants in population-based studies. I am interested in finding coherent ways of incorporating functional genomic information into priors to aid the detection of these causal variants. I have also recently become interested in developing statistical approaches to determine essential bacterial genes using transposon insertion data (next generation sequencing). One such approach uses modified Hidden-Markov models.

Dr Antony Williams
Anthony.Williams@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Tony's research interests are focused in areas of critical psychology and psychoanalytic concepts and theory. To date his research has focused on contributing to the concept of a critical educational psychology. Related areas of interest include group dynamics, conceptions of mental health and emotional wellbeing, case study research and the use of reflexive and interpretative research methods.

Dr Liam Foster
l.foster@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Research interests

Much of my research focus is on inequalities in later life and policy implications, particularly in relation to pensions. This has often included a gendered focus. The role of planning for retirement has also been explored. I have liaised with the Labour Party, Trade Unions, the European Parliament and pension providers about these findings. I am also interested in theories of ageing and the application of the political economy of ageing. I have also published on the notion of active ageing considering comparative policy approaches to the implementation of active ageing measures. The impact of poverty and social exclusion on policy has been central to much of my research, for instance, in relation to my work with colleagues on funeral provision and the notion of responsibility and on social quality. I employ a variety of methods in my research including interviews, surveys and secondary data analysis of secondary data sets. These skills have been used in consultancy work for the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) employing quantitative methods to evaluate student satisfaction and career paths following the completion of Architecture degrees and for AXA Wealth in relation to pension education.

Dr Guenter Moebus
g.moebus@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

Research interests

Core research develops from the advancement of methods of Characterization, Patterning and Irradiation of Materials on the Nanoscale (Nanometrology & Nanomanipulation). These methods are applied in collaboration with research groups spanning a wide range of research fields in optical, energy, catalytical and biomedical materials sectors. Particular materials examinations include oxide nanoparticles, nanoscale hydroxyapatite, metallic nanostructures with special plasmonic properties, porous alumina and related nanocomposites, piezo-actuation materials, metallic multi-layers, and multi-component oxide glasses, including those for radionuclide immobilisation.

Recent priority research topics include:

  • Developments in Nano-Tomography for 3D reconstruction of nanoparticles, nanophases and for 3D chemical mapping of composites.
  • Atomistic structure of nanoparticles, their surface structures and structural dynamics related to catalytic activity, as well as particle-coalescence, using quantitative high- resolution electron microscopy (HREM) and in-situ TEM.
  • Study of structure and chemistry of glasses and ceramics, including radiation induced fluidity, local determination of coordination and oxidation states of cations, coordination of borate units, and precipitation in oxide glasses (e.g. alkali-borosilicates, zinc-borosilicate).
  • Electron and ion beam interactions with materials, including irradiation for patterning of surfaces for nanotechnology applications. New method of porous-alumina-masked ion implantation into substrates for optical and magnetic nanodot patterning
Dr Amaka Offiah
a.offiah@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism
The Medical School

Research interests

I am interested in the imaging of the paediatric musculoskeletal system including suspected child abuse, skeletal dysplasias including osteogenesis imperfecta and rheumatological conditions such as juvenile dermatomysosits and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. My research includes developing methods of determining which children have fragile bones prone to fracture and which do not. More specifically, I am concentrating on the optimisation of current techniques and development of novel methods of distinguishing brittle from normal bones, in understanding the mechanisms of accidental injury in infants and young children, in post-mortem imaging and in improving the detection and dating of the subtle fractures seen in abuse. More generally within the paediatric musculoskeletal system I am developing normative data for a signficant number of radiographic parameters measured in children for which robust normal standards do not exist, including vertebral fracture assessment, base of skull measurements and bone age. In collaboration with colleagues from the Department of Engineering, I am developing finite element models of children's bones to improve our understanding of accidental and inflicted injuries. My research has a focus on learning and teaching, and amongst other projects I am developing a module for medical students/junior doctors to improve their understanding of the Courtroom experience in the context of suspected child abuse.

Dr Colin Smith
c.c.smith@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

Research interests:

  • Limit analysis in geotechnics: development of new numerical and analytical tools, including development of a  new numerical technique Discontinuity Layout Optimization (DLO) for solution of plasticity problems and its application in a range of areas including offshore and unsaturated soils.
  • Masonry arch bridge analysis, modelling and assessment, including the development of a full scale plane strain testing tank for soil structure interaction in masonry arch bridges in collaboration with the University of Salford.
  • Design code development focusing on theory and application of design codes using numerical methods and Eurocode 7.
  • Unsaturated soil-structure interaction. Soil physics, soil-biology interaction and micromechanics.

The experimental work has a strong basis in physical modelling, supported in particular by innovative digital imaging techniques.  Whilst at Sheffield his research has been funded by EPSRC, NERC and industry.

He is co-founder of a University spin-out company LimitState Ltd. The company specialises in the development of novel ultimate limit state analysis and design software applications which make use of research methods developed in the University, including LimitState:GEO, a rapid tool for geotechnical limit analysis in use in industry and universities in over 30 countries across the world.

Dr Julie Walsh
j.c.walsh@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of Sociological Studies

My research is influenced by my historical involvement with Youth and Community Work and focuses on family, and the social constructions of what is perceived to be a 'normal' family within specific contexts.

More broadly, I am interested in the ways in which the gender, generation, ethnicity, race and migration status of family members impacts on their sense of 'belonging' to both their 'family' and the broader community.  I am also interested in the strategies employed by families, and individuals within families, to foster this sense of 'belonging' within a certain place. In addition to this, I have a long-standing interest in qualitative and ethnographic research methods and working with individuals and communities to understand the impact of broader narratives on everyday life.

I am interested in supervising research students who intend to focus on any of the following issues (in UK and/or other national/regional/international contexts):

    • Family and the relationships between ‘family’ members.
    • Community and ‘belonging’.
    • Intersections of gender, generation, ethnicity, race and migration status.
    • Multiculture and multiculturalism.
    • Qualitative and ethnographic research methods.
Professor Frances Babbage
f.babbage@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of English Literature

Research interests

I welcome PhD applicants who wish to undertake research in fields that include contemporary theatre practice; devising; theatrical adaptation and rewriting; performance documentation and archive studies; and applied theatres. Sheffield University encourages practice-based as well as traditionally framed PhDs; I have supervised and examined several practice-based doctorates and am very happy to discuss such applications from potential research students. I currently supervise or co-supervise PhD projects in: aerial performance as critical practice; representations of ageing in contemporary British theatre; new models of performance dramaturgy; paratext and contemporary theatre; the methods of Maxwell and the New York City Players.

Professor Thomas Bridgeland
T.Bridgeland@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

I am an algebraic geometer with a particular interest in homological methods and interactions with string theory. My main focus is on properties of derived categories of coherent sheaves on algebraic varieties. These arise in string theory as categories of D-branes, and are related via Kontsevich's famous homological mirror symmetry conjecture to Fukaya categories of symplectic manifolds. Categories with similar properties and a more explicit flavour can be defined using representations of quivers. Other closely related mathematical areas I have an interest in are Donaldson-Thomas invariants and Hall algebras.

Dr Kate Davison
kate.davison@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of History

Research interests

Kate’s research focuses on early modern British social and cultural history, with a particular focus on the late seventeenth and early eighteenth century.  She has a particular interest in humour and laughter in this period, and how they played a part in social practices and political processes.  Through this she has engaged with broader historiographical debates around the ‘civilising process’ and the rise of politeness, as well as the development of a ‘public sphere’ of sociability and political participation.  She also has an interest in approaches and methods associated with social network analysis in historical contexts.

Professor John Henneberry
j.henneberry@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Urban Studies and Planning

Research interests

My research focuses on the structure and behaviour of the property market and its relation to the wider economy and state regulatory systems. I have developed a distinctive institutional perspective on the subject that is rooted in cultural economy. I use both qualitative and quantitative methods to explore property markets, working closely with econometric colleagues on occasion to analyse regularities in market behaviour. I have a particular interest in the way that calculative practices – such as valuation, financial appraisal and portfolio analysis and management – shape property markets and affect urban and regional development.

Dr Robin Highley
robin.highley@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Neuroscience

I am interested in the neuropathology and pathophysiology of neurodegeneration, in particular motor neurone disease (MND), Parkinson’s disease and dementia. I use standard neuropathological techniques to characterize post mortem tissue kindly donated by individuals with these diseases and to highlight contrasts with tissue from people who were free from disease. These methods are used to study genes, proteins and molecular pathways of interest and the pathological effects of gene mutations known to neurodegeneration.

I study mouse, zebrafish and cellular models of disase and the comparison of these with human tissue based pathology

Professor Arne Hole
a.r.hole@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Economics

Research interests

Arne´s research interests lie in the area of applied microeconometrics, focusing on health and labour economics. He has a particular interest in stated preference methods and the econometric analysis of discrete choice data. He also has an interest in statistical programming and has written several modules for the statistical software package Stata. He has been in involved in research projects funded by the UK Medical Research Council and the Research Council of Norway, among others. Arne is interested in supervising PhD students in applied microeconometrics.

Dr Maxine Johnson
m.johnson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

My research interests include the organisation of health care delivery. In particular, I have been involved in qualitative evaluations of health care from the patient and provider perspective. I have a particular interest in the prevention and self-management of obesity and chronic illness.

More recently I have been involved in synthesising evidence for public health guidance for NICE. In this role I am interested in the development of methods which involve identifying and assessing of a variety of study types in order to provide reviews of evidence that address current public health issues.

Dr Miguel Juarez
m.juarez@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

I am interested in Bayesian hierarchical modelling for panel and longitudinal data, in particular to address problems in econometrics and biology.  I have developed mixture models capable of accommodating skewness and non-Gaussian tail behaviour in econometrics. I have been involved in developing models for systems biology as well, specifically trying to understand gene regulatory networks. Recentrly, I have developed models to analyse images from super-resolution microscopy.  I am also interested in objective Bayesian methods and their relationship with measures of information.

Dr Michele Lancione
m.lancione@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Urban Studies and Planning

Research interests

In my research I seek to challenge mainstream understandings relating to issues of marginality, poverty, and difference in the contemporary urban. My work is principally qualitative, sustained by in-depth ethnographic fieldwork and informed by theoretical grounding in assemblage thinking, critical urban theory, affective space, biopolitics.

Recently, I have conducted extensive research in Bucharest (Romania) around two separate issues: street-level drug use and services for drug users; evictions, activism and homelessness. Wider research interests include visual and participatory methods, the everyday life of cities, and the role of academics beyond academia.

Dr Adrian Leyland
a.leyland@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

Research interests

Dr Leyland´s main research interests are plasma-based coatings & treatments for surface engineering and tribology, wear & corrosion of surfaces. Coatings and treatments studied include PVD ceramic, metallic and nanocomposite films and hybrid/duplex substrate pre-treatment by diffusion hardening, plasma electrolysis or interlayering (eg. by electroless plating), to improve coating durability. Practical applications for these processing methods range from tribological (friction and wear), through thermal barriers, to high temperature & aqueous corrosion-control – as well as biomedical, optical and other functional property requirements.

Dr Munitta Muthana
m.muthana@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism
The Medical School

Research interests

My research focuses on the role of innate immune cells like macrophages and dendritic cells in diseases including cancer and rheumatoid arthritis.  Recently, I have used my knowledge of this area to develop innovative cell-based methods to target anticancer thereapy to tumours.  For example, I have devised a way to use macrophages to deliver large quantities of cancer-killing virus to both primary and secondary tumours simultaneously (click here).  My group is also interested in improving the delivery of therapies to diseased tissue using a nanomagnetic targeting approach.

Dr Caroline Oates
c.j.oates@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

My main research efforts are focused on challenges in marketing, including sustainable marketing and marketing to children. My particular interests are centred on consumer behaviour, for instance how individuals make choices around sustainable consumption. My current research with colleagues from Scotland and Ireland investigates influences on sustainable consumer behaviour. My other research interest is marketing to children and here I am interested in what children understand when encountering marketing episodes across different media and in different contexts. I mainly work with qualitative methods.

 

Professor Siddharth Patwardhan
s.patwardhan@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

Picture

Research in the group undertakes the synthesis of bespoke nanomaterials using biologically inspired green routes.

The group aims to demonstrate potential of green methods for nanomaterials synthesis by realisation of their real-life applications.  Current projects in his group are focussed on developing application of     green nanomaterials in four distinct sectors:   


Technologies allowing scaled-up continuous manufacturing of these novel materials are also being developed.

Focus is on increasing technology readiness level (TRL) for new developments and delivering technologies that are ready for commercialisation.

Dr Jem Rongong
j.a.rongong@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

Viscoelastic damping materials
• development, analysis and testing of polymers
• design and testing of syntactic foams and other multiphase systems

Surface damping treatments
• free and constrained layer systems using organic and ceramic materials
• methods of application

Friction-based systems
• design and analysis of particle dampers including the use of discrete element analysis
• granular polymeric materials as fillers
• metal mesh and other dry fibre systems

Active & Adaptive Structures
• active constrained layer damping
• adaptive particle dampers
• shape memory actuated systems

Design of damped components
• hollow turbomachinery blades
• numerical optimisation techniques including genetic algorithms and cellular automata
• composite structures

Miss Fiona Scott
f.scott@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Fiona’s work is located in the field of digital literacies. Her research engages with sociomaterial theory to theorise very young children’s intra-actions with digital devices and texts. She is concerned with child and family practices in relation to the digital and, in particular, the role played by social class. Fiona is also interested in research methods and methodologies, including the tensions associated with researching children’s lives in more-than-human contexts. Fiona’s PhD thesis, produced in collaboration with CBeebies, examined preschool children’s engagements with television and related media at home.

Dr Francesco Sella
f.sella@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Psychology

Proficient mathematical learning represents a key aspect of academic achievement, and it is also an important skill for a competitive workforce. My research focuses on understanding the cognitive mechanisms involved in the acquisition of numerical skills in typically and atypically developing individuals. I have been implementing different research methods to explore basic numerical representations in preschool and primary school children and how these representations relate to mathematical learning. I am particularly interested in how young children learn the numerical meaning of number words and Arabic digits (i.e., symbol-grounding).

Dr Anthony Simons
a.j.simons@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Computer Science

Research interests

Dr Simons’ research focuses on turning formal results from verification and testing into practical benefits for software engineering. His current research areas include model-based testing and model-driven engineering, with applications to Cloud computing. He has also published widely in object-oriented software engineering, including type theory and software development methods. He is inventor of the JWalk automatic software testing tool for Java; and the JAST library for processing XML in Java. He is co-author of the OPEN Toolbox of Techniques.

Professor Neil Sims
n.sims@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

Smart fluids

• Modelling and design of smart fluid dampers
• Control and stability of smart fluid dampers
• Commercialisation of smart fluid dampers for consumer and industrial applications
• Research projects include the ADLAND project

Machining vibration:

• Methods for predicting and preventing chatter in high speed machining
• Active and passive vibration control during machining
• Research projects include the EPSRC research grants on chatter avoidance, and process damping

Uncertainty propagation:

• The role of uncertainty in structural dynamics problems
• Propagation techniques
• Application to smart materials and machining problems
• Application to modelling and design of energy harvesting systems
• Research funded by the EPSRC platform grant on Uncertainty Propagation in Structures, Systems and Processes

Dr Lisa Stampnitzky
l.stampnitzky.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Politics and International Relations

My research focuses on political discourse in the war on terror.   My first book addresses the history of "terrorism" and terrorism expertise.  My current research focuses on debates over the permissibility of torture in the U.S. after 9/11.  I have used a variety of methods, including interviewing, discourse analysis, and archival research. 

I am particularly keen to hear from research students focusing on

  • the intersections of knowledge, violence, and power
  • the politics of expertise
  • historical and sociological approaches to politics and the state
  • terrorism and the war on terror
  • the politics of human rights
Dr Mikko Vehkapera
m.vehkapera@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering

My research fits broadly in the fields of communication theory, information theory, and signal processing. In addition to working on novel mathematical analysis and algorithm development in future wireless communication systems, I am interested in Bayesian estimation and computational methods for inference in graphical models and complex systems.

Some specific topics I have recently worked on:
 
- MIMO and Massive MIMO Techniques
- Full-Duplex Communications
- Multiple-Access Techniques and Relaying
- Effects of Hardware Impairments and Mismatched Detection
- Physical Layer Security
- Compressed Sensing
- Bioinformatics


Professor James Wild
j.m.wild@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease
The Medical School

Research interests

My research focus is the physics and engineering and clinical applications of MR imaging of hyperpolarised gases (3He and 129Xe) and protons in the lungs and pulmonary vasculature.

Physics and engineering projects include:

  • rapid acquisition methods for imaging of inhaled hyperpolarised gases using compressed sensing, steady state free precession and parallel imaging.
  • Techniques for simultaneous imaging of 1H, 3He and 129Xe in the lungs.
  • RF coil hardware engineering for 3He and 129Xe lung MRI.
  • 3He and 129Xe MRI at different magnetic field strengths.
  • Spin exchange optical pumping physics for polarisation of 3He and 129Xe.
  • Measuring and modelling gas flow and diffusion in the lungs; physiological models of alveolar geometry and gas exchange.
Professor Susan Yeandle
s.yeandle@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

My research, publications and teaching have focused on the relationship between work and care in contemporary societies, and on how people manage caring roles and responsibilities throughout the life course.

I specialise in research with the potential for policy and practical impact, and have expertise in making complex research findings accessible to a wide range of audiences, wide experience of research design and methods, and extensive knowledge of policy on care, carers and employment.

I currently supervise PhD students studying the work of carers’ organisations (Jenny Read) and the provision of home care in Shanghai (Wenjing Jin), and welcome enquiries from prospective PhD students wishing to study topics in my specialist field.

Dr Karl Travis
k.travis@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

Research interests

Alternative Disposal Concepts: Deep Borehole Disposal
Geological disposal of HLW and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in very deep boreholes is a concept whose time has come. The alternative – disposal in a mined, engineered repository is beset with difficulties not least of which are the constraints placed upon the engineered barriers by the high thermal loading. 
The deep borehole concept offers a potentially safer, faster and more cost-effective solution. The deep borehole research group at Sheffield (Travis and Gibb) is at the forefront of international efforts to develop this concept. We are currently working with Sandia National Labs on a program leading to the drilling of pilot borehole in the USA. Our work includes: developing sealing and support matrices, rock welding and deployment mechanisms, and employs a combination of experiment and continuum modeling (Finite differences and Smooth Particle Applied Mechanics).

Behaviour of Materials under extreme conditions
Our main focus here is on wasteform performance. The detrimental effects of self-irradiation (mostly alpha decay) of immobilised radionuclides include: swelling, amorphisation and crack formation in ceramics and de-vitrification in glasses. We use computational methods (mainly molecular dynamics and topological modeling) and statistical mechanics to examine the consequences of alpha recoil damage and understand the recovery pathways in these materials. Recent research is aimed at understanding why some materials have a greater resistance to radiation-induced amorphisation. The use of Smooth Particle Applied Mechanics in understanding how materials fail under mechanical and thermal loading is another area of interest.

Simulation Methodology
Software Packages certainly have a role to play in the Materials Science and Engineering community, but new research often requires new methods of simulation that are not supported by off-the-shelf codes. Developing new simulation methods and codes is a key area of interest for this research group. 
Previous research in this area includes the development of configurational thermostats and barostats for molecular simulation and a method which allows an unambiguous determination of the role played by intramolecular flexibility on transport properties of liquids. Recent work in collaboration with Bill and Carol Hoover, has lead to a new algorithm for simulating Joule-Thomson expansion of gases.

Professor Lee Brammer
lee.brammer@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemistry

Research Interests

Our current research can be divided, broadly speaking, into three areas: (i) inorganic supramolecular chemistry, (ii) porous coordination framework materials, and (iii) reactions in molecular crystals.

Work in inorganic supramolecular chemistry involves the use of transition metals to influence the construction and properties of supramolecular assemblies in the solid state (crystal engineering) and in solution. We have a number of ongoing projects in this area, but the principal focus is on (a) detailed study of intermolecular interactions using various experimental and computational methods, and (b) the application of the knowledge gained to the construction of network solids (infinite assemblies).

Framework materials based upon coordination chemistry, often known as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), provide a highly versatile alternative to well-established porous materials such as zeolites. Their synthesis is based upon molecular chemistry and they are typically constructed as crystalline network solids using metal centres as nodes which are linked via organic bridging ligands. Applications range from sorption and storage of gases (including hydrogen) and volatile pollutants, to host-guest chemistry for chemical separations and even catalysis. Current efforts in our group are focused on flexible, responsive materials and upon functionalised materials tailored to specific applications. Studies involve synthesis, characterisation by diffraction methods (single crystal, powder) and by a range of other techniques including thermal analyses and spectroscopy.

Facilities

Our research is based in excellent modern synthetic laboratories built in 2003, with an accompanying office suite for students and postdocs. The department maintains excellent instrumentation facilities for spectroscopy (NMR, IR, MS) and we have an outstanding X-ray diffraction facility that is crucial in characterisation of the crystalline materials that we study. We also make extensive use of major national and international facilities for diffraction, in particular high flux synchrotron X-ray facilities in the UK (Daresbury SRS and in future Diamond) and at the ESRF in Grenoble, France.

General

My general philosophy is to make use of a variety of approaches and techniques in pursuing research goals. A better overall understanding is developed by such an approach. Thus, students and postdocs have the opportunity to be exposed to many aspects of chemistry, while perhaps developing greater expertise or interests in certain aspects of a project. Many projects involve some synthesis of organic, organometallic and/or coordination compounds, and will involve supramolecular synthesis and/or materials synthesis methods (e.g. solvothermal synthesis). NMR and IR spectroscopy are widely employed and extensive use is made of diffraction methods, particularly single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction, but also neutron diffraction. Materials characterization methods (e.g. DSC, TGA) are also used where needed and computational chemistry is used to support efforts in other areas. Where appropriate the work is conducted within the research group, but collaborative efforts with other research groups have always proven important in our work. We have established collaborations in areas of synthetic and computational chemistry, diffraction and materials characterisation such as gas sorption and magnetic measurements. Such collaborations often provide opportunities for group members to visit and work in other research labs.

Professor Anthony Meijer
a.meijer@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemistry

Research Interests:

Our research focuses on the theoretical/computational study of chemical reactions. The systems studied vary from small fundamental gas-phase reactions via gas-surface reactions to reactions involving flexible molecules. The results of these calculations are used together with the results of sophisticated experiments to obtain insight into the fundamentals of the reactions involved and to get a fundamental understanding of reaction dynamics. Below are given some projects to illustrate the work.

Gas-surface scattering

We are currently working on the formation of H2 on graphite. H2 is the most abundant molecule in interstellar space and it plays an important role in the formation of stars and in interstellar chemistry through reactions with ions and radicals. Moreover, the energetics of the reaction directly influences the thermal balance of the interstellar medium. H2 is generally supposed to be formed on interstellar dust grains for which the graphite is used as a template. Our calculations complement experiments done in the group of Prof. S. D. Price at UCL and astronomical modelling and observations done in the groups of Prof. D. A. Williams and Dr. J. Rawlings at UCL through the Centre for Cosmic Chemistry and Physics.

Gas-phase reactions

We have done extensive work on the H + O2 combustion reaction in the past, in particular focusing on the role the total angular momentum in this reaction. This lead to the first-ever rigorous theoretical cross sections, which compared well with experimental data from the Wolfrum group at the University of Heidelberg. We are re-investigating this reaction in collaboration with Dr. M. Hankel of the University of Queensland.

We are also currently applying the methods developed to the photo-dissociation of molecules inside van der Waals complexes, such as Ar-H2S and Ar-H2O, where angular momentum effects allow the van der Waals molecule to survive when one of its constituent molecules, such as H2S, is dissociated. We also have plans to apply the developed methods to the calculation of rates for reactions between radicals at low temperatures, which is important for our understanding of the interstellar medium and our understanding of extraterrestial planets and moons.

Reactions and Structure of conformationally flexible molecules

As molecules become larger, they generally become more flexible. As a consequence the potential energy surface becomes more complicated with many local minima, which may or may not be accessible at thermal energies. Each of these minima will be a distinct structure with e.g. a distinct IR spectrum. We are currently working on methods to allow us to generate many minima, which can then be screened for further investigation. This work ties into a number of collaborations we have, such as with Dr. Mathias Schäffer of the University of Cologne, who studies conformationally flexible molecules in the gas-phase using IRMPD spectroscopy as well as internal collaborations on the structure, reactivity, and properties of organic and organometallic compounds.

Algorithm development for Quantum Dynamics Calculations

Quantum Dynamics calculations are significantly harder than standard electronic structure calculations due e.g. the exponential scaling with respect to the basis set size. We are working on methods that will allow us to solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation more quickly. In particular, we develop efficient parallel methods to make calculations tractable.

Dr Ziqi Zhang
ziqi.zhang@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Information School

Main research interests

My research interests are in the areas of   Semantic Web, Natural Language Processing, Text Mining, Machine Learning and Data Science. Particularly in

  • Information Extraction: how to automatically turn unstructured, natural language text into structured representation that could support machine understandability and reasoning. This could include the extraction of terms, concepts, named entities, and relations between them from texts.
  • Social media analysis: the application and adaptation of Information Extraction methods onto social media text analytics, to discover knowledge that enable business intelligence or decision making in a wide range of domains.
  • Disambiguation: how to teach machines to automatically identify which meaning of a word or phrase is used within certain context.
  • Lexical semantics: how to represent the ‘meaning’ of a word, name, phrase, or sentence; how to measure the relatedness and similarity of these meanings (semantic relatedness and similarity). 
  • Knowledge base construction: the use of all the above technology in the automatic creation of structured ‘databases’ that support machine understandability and reasoning; and methods of mapping such knowledge bases (ontology alignment, ontology mapping). An example of a knowledge base is the Google Knowledge Graph, or DBpedia. 
  • Semantic Web and Linked Data: the use of all the above technology to enable the vision of tomorrow’s Web where machine understandable data are put on the Web, shared and reused across application, enterprise, and community boundaries.

Potential topics:

  • Detecting and tracking hate speech on the social media: Social media such as Twitter is increasingly exploited for the propagation of hate speech and extremism content and the organisation of related activities. Implementing effective counter measures depends on the real-time understanding of such content, i.e., automated detection of the emergence and spread of the content, and semantic content analysis. I am interested in developing novel, scalable text mining and machine learning methods that can support the automatic identification, analysis and tracking of hate speech on the social media.
  • Understanding the role of social media in the support of personal health management (with quantitative focus): social media is playing an important role in the generation and sharing of health information, as studies have shown that a substantial and increasing percentage of population is seeking and following health advice found on SMS. I am interested in developing methods that can automatically retrieve and analyse such information from social media to understand the impact of using such resources on health improvement. For example, what kinds of health related information are shared, and how much are considered useful by information seekers.
  • Mapping and aligning very large knowledge bases: Information Extraction techniques have been widely adopted in the automatic construction of very large knowledge bases (e.g., the Google knowledge base). However, one major challenge that remains for the use of such knowledge bases is heterogeneity, the fact that many different knowledge bases contain overlapping information that is described differently. Further, different knowledge bases often contain complementary data. For example, NELL has over 15,000 instances of ‘Disease’ while DBpedia has 5,600. I am interested in developing methods to align and integrate large scale knowledge bases, particularly those that are created by automatic text mining techniques, often contain noisy data (e.g., inaccurate facts). To do so, techniques such as Machine Learning, semantic similarity, and data mining will be used.
Dr Nicole Baumgarten
n.baumgarten@sheffield.ac.uk

School of Languages and Cultures

 Research interests

I welcome research students who are interested in applied linguistics in its broadest sense. Qualitative and multiple/mixed methods approaches (incl. participatory and inclusive designs), interdisciplinary research as well as collaborations with institutions and organizations outside the University are all welcome. Interesting topics include but are not restricted to the following

 

  • Individual multilingualism (from a socio-cultural perspective)
  • Intercultural communication
  • Interpersonal communication
  • English as a Lingua Franca
  • Translation and localization
  • Multimodal communication (including audiovisual translation)
  • Intercultural/contrastive pragmatics
  • Register analysis (comparative/diachronic)
  • Communication in organizations and institutions (including web-based communication)
  • Business communication
  • Interaction with technology (including user studies)
  • Technology and science communication
  • Risk, health and safety communication
  • Medical communication
  • Second language use
  • Second language identities

 

Dr John Brierley
J.A.Brierley@Sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interest

His research interest is in the area of product costing. In relation to product costing, he is interested in supervising students in areas like the factors influencing the adoption of activity-based costing (ABC), the factors influencing cost system sophistication/complexity, the effects of ABC and cost system sophisitcation on performance outcomes, like satisfaction with the cost system, the usefulness of cost information in cost management and decision making, and overall financial performance.

In relation to research impact, he has carried out research into the calculation of denominators of overhead rates. Although the majority of companies calculate the denominator using the budgeted capacity, this may not be the most appropriate denominator capacity to use. Details of the research and the alternative methods available can be found athttp://cmawebline.org/joomla4/images/stories/JAMAR%202006%20Summer/JAMAR-v4-2-Reasons%20for%20Adopting.

Dr Joanne Britton
n.j.britton@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Research interests

My research focuses on the meaning and role of race and racism and the significance of social identity in a range of contexts including the criminal justice system, legal profession and voluntary sector. In keeping with developments in these areas, it has a specific focus on critical whiteness and mixed race studies. I have a long standing interest in European Muslims and have completed research which examined the interplay of race, ethnicity, gender and generation in the lives of Muslim men.

I welcome applications to study for MPhil or PhD research degrees with me, either full or part-time, in any  of the following areas linked to my research interests:

  • Social identity
  • Race and racism
  • Intersectionality of race, ethnicity, gender and generation
  • European Muslims
  • Multiculture and multiculturalism
  • Qualitative and ethnographic research methods
Professor Christopher Burton
chris.burton@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Academic Unit of Medical Education
School of Health and Related Research

I am an academic GP with a particular interest in how doctors and patients deal with persistent physical symptoms. My work aims to help doctors explain symptoms constructively. We recognise that symptoms have both peripheral (body) and central (brain) processes and the challenge is to translate developments in science, particularly neuroscience, into explanations which safely make sense of symptoms for patients and lead to better management

I have other interests around diagnosis, testing and reassurance, and healthcare use in relation to both mental and physical ill-health. I use a variety of methods including analysis of large data, development and evaluation of clinical interventions, and technological innovation.

Within the university I lead the Academic Unit of Primary Care, and represent the Academic Unit of Medical Education on faculty research committees. I am a member of the Centre for Urgent Care Research within ScHARR.

Professor Daniel Coca
d.coca@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering

Research interests:

My research work spans the broad area of nonlinear and complex dynamical systems. I am interested in developing novel mathematical, computational and analytical methods to analyse, model and control complex dynamical systems as well as apply the tools developed to complex systems in physics, engineering, life sciences and finance.

Complex systems modelling, identification and control:
Stem cell population dynamics; Crystal growth; Brain activity; Solar wind - magnetosphere interaction; Financial markets.

Bioimaging & biological data analysis:
Diffuse Optical Tomography; Protein Identification/Protein Mass Fingerprinting; Cell imaging data analysis.

Nonlinear Control Theory:
Controller design for nonlinear PDEs; Nonlinear predictive control.

Reconfigurable computers:
FPGA hardware acceleration of protein identification algorithms; FPGA implementation of computationally intensive control & optimization algorithms.

Dr Danielle Densley Tingley
d.densleytingley@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

Her research interests centre around reducing the whole life carbon of the built environment, exploring the effectiveness of different methods to achieve this, across multiple scales - predominately buildings and cities. She has a particular interest in the use of materials to reduce whole life carbon.

The building level approach explores design strategies to reduce whole life and embodied carbon, this includes areas such as design for deconstruction and material reuse, design for adaptability, use of low carbon materials and material efficiency.

At the city scale, an urban metabolism approach is taken, exploring the material metabolism of cities, seeking to answer the question, what are our cities made of? A greater understanding of city stocks enables strategic planning decisions and retrofit and can highlight future reuse potential thus faciliating greater material salvage.

Professor Caroline Jackson
c.m.jackson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Archaeology

Research interests:

My research interests are very varied and diverse. For instance I have worked on lithics in Swaziland, conducted surveying work with the University of Cardiff at the Sacred Animal Necropolis in Saqqara and excavated at Amarna in Egypt.

My main research is however, on the study and scientific analysis of archaeological materials, specialising in glass and other vitreous materials such as faience. The primary focus of this work is in Bronze Age Egypt and the Aegean mainly from production sites and on Roman glasses from consumption contexts. I use scientific methods to analyse archaeological glass and experimental archaeology to elucidate patterns relating to provenance, trade and consumption in the ancient and historic world.

  • Material culture in the Roman and Ancient Egyptian worlds.
  • The technology of glasses
  • The analysis of glasses to explore production and consumption patterns
  • Experimental archaeology
  • Craft production in Egypt
  • Provenance studies
Dr Frazer Jarvis
A.F.Jarvis@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

Dr Jarvis works in the area of algebraic number theory, an area which uses techniques from algebra, algebraic geometry and classical number theory, amongst others. In particular, he studies the relationship between modular forms, elliptic curves and representations of Galois groups. That this is currently an active area of research is clear from the recent proof of Fermat's Last Theorem by Andrew Wiles; Wiles uses exactly these methods in his proof. Dr Jarvis is particularly interested in generalisations of these ideas (known as the Langlands Philosophy), and even in possible generalisations of Fermat's Last Theorem. For example, one might ask whether the Fermat equation of a given degree (or a similar equation) has solutions in a given field extension of the rationals. Within this speciality, there are a number of possible research topics.

Professor Bill Lee
w.j.lee@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

I have published on a wide range of topics across the accounting, management and related disciplines including articles on the relationship between accounting and technological change, the professional socialization of junior auditors and the origins and history of qualitative research in accounting. My enduring research interests are those that allow me to combine the interests from my own education with my position in accounting. Thus, my research in recent years has tended to focus on two broad areas: Research Methods and Research Practice; and the intersection of accounting and accountability with the organization of work, opportunities for learning and government support of learning initiatives.

I am keen to supervise students who wish to conduct qualitative research studies in the areas of management accounting, public sector accounting, social accounting and accountability.

Dr Juliana Matos De Meira
j.m.meira@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Juliana’s research interests range from management accounting to inter-disciplinary accounting.

 

PhD supervision:

 

Juliana would be interested in supervising students with projects on:

  • supply chain and accounting,
  • managing reverse logistics, retails returns, and circular economy
  • performance measurement and balanced scorecard
  • strategic management accounting, including beyond budgeting
  • accounting and human resource management, including HR monitoring in the supply chain and cost-benefit analysis of adaptations for people with disabilities at work

She is interested in all three aspects of sustainability: people, profits and planet. Juliana has also an interest in extending her research to include environmental accounting, closing the sustainability loop. Her research is based on mixed methods, utilising mainly case studies and surveys as methodological approaches.

Dr Oleksandr Mykhaylyk
o.mykhaylyk@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of Chemistry

Research Interests

Scattering methods

Much of my research focuses on the structural analysis of soft matter materials and in particular polymers. We live in a Golden age of Materials Science and Biology, based on a solid underpinning from Chemistry and Physics. One of the keys to this success is recent progress in structural characterization techniques where scattering methods, giving access to structural organization of matter from atomic scales to microns, occupy a dominating role. Experimental data obtained by scattering methods (SAXS, WAXS, XRD, SANS and SLS) provide structural information associated with Fourier space. My research investigates how this information can be transformed into real space, convenient for our understanding. This involves structural modelling, Monte-Carlo simulations and Fourier transformation techniques. An advantage of scattering methods is that they can be used for kinetic studies of materials in-situ in different environments. Therefore, an other aspect of my work is design of dedicated experimental set-ups for studying materials under external impact such as shear flow or extensional flow, temperature or pH changes. I have a continuous interest in fat crystallization, colloids and nanoparticles structure, in particular core-shell systems (examples of my research are nanodiamonds to carbon onions transition, a phase separation of polyurethane confined by a nanosized spherical shell). My current research is on thermo-responsive block-copolymer micelles and vesicles.

Research Oleksandr Mykhaylyk

Mechano-optical rheology

Rheology is widely recognized as a basic method in processing of polymers, food and cosmetics. In addition, visualization can be used as an effective tool for studying phenomena taking place in fluids. Since soft matter materials subjected to flow often demonstrate a related anisotropy in their refractive index and stress, this causes birefringence visualizing the flow. I have recently developed a new combinatorial technique, shear-induced polarized light imaging (SIPLI), for rheo-optical measurements of polymeric liquids. The SIPLI technique has already been successfully used for studying shear-induced nucleation and crystallization of polyolefins (see the figure), fibrillation in natural silks and flow alignment of block-copolymer self-assembled structures. My present research focuses on further development of SIPLI for in-situ studies of shear-induced phenomena such as stress, orientation and structural transitions taking place in gels, polymers, copolymers, liquid crystals and colloids.

Polymer crystallization

Microstructure of solidified polymers depends on thermo-mechanical process history. In general, processed thermoplastics are composed of two structural morphologies: spherulitic (isotropic) and shish-kebab (anisotropic). Ratio of these morphologies in the end-product controls its mechanical properties and material performance. While spherulitic structure is reasonably understood there is still no a reliable theory for structural formation of shear-induced shish-kebabs. My work is on physical understanding of how the formation of shear-induced morphologies is related to polymer polydispersity, thermodynamics and flow conditions. Based on our research we have proposed a four-stage model for shish-kebab formation including stretching of molecules, nucleation, aggregation and fibrillation.

Dr Janine Owens
jan.owens@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Research interests

My research interests fall into four areas; disability and marginalised groups, embodiment and experiences of oral health, health promotion, and cultural beliefs and practices related to health.  I work across-disciplines bringing in disability studies, psychology, political theory and sociology to dentistry.

I am a member of the British Society of Disability and Oral Health Teacher's Group which seeks to expand teaching and knowledge of disability within undergraduate and postgraduate curricula. It also contributes to policy for children and adults with disabilities.

My main areas of expertise are disability studies, qualitative research and its related methods and methodologies. My aim is to promote inclusion in research so we are working with people, not researching on them.  One example is co-production and the benefits of working directly with community groups such as people with learning disabilities and/or parents and children. Another example is using narrative to release the voices of people who may be unable to verbalise. 

Professor Eva Qwarnstrom
e.qwarnstrom@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease
The Medical School

Research interests

My research focuses on regulation of inflammatory responses, specifically on events related to receptor function and cell signalling. The programme includes analysis of activities induced by soluble mediators such as growth-factors and cytokines, and by biomechanical events, regulated through matrix structure and the cytoskeleton. Current studies focus on TIR mediated responses, primarily the analysis of Toll-like and IL-1 receptor function and signal transduction. Recent findings include identification of a novel TIR regulating receptor (TILRR), which controls immune and inflammatory signal transduction through the IL-1 type I signalling receptor. Work on signal transduction is centred on analysis of molecular mechanism controlling the NF-κβ pathway, with particular emphasis on signalling crosstalk, and the use of real time analysis of regulatory events. Collaborative projects include the use of single cell analysis and GFP-based methods as the basis for computational modelling of complex regulatory networks.

Dr Lukasz Szulc
l.szulc@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of Sociological Studies

Lukasz’s work is dedicated to cultural and critical media studies which investigate the role of media in everyday life. He has been particularly interested in the intersections of queer, national and transnational identities in the context of globalisation and digital media. He usually discusses those topics from the perspective of Central and Eastern European countries, particularly Poland, advocating internationalisation and de-westernisation of media studies. His current research project looks into the transformations of identity in the digital media landscape of the early XXI century, examining self-presentation practices of Polish LGBTQs in the UK.

Research areas:

  • Cultural and critical media studies
  • Digital media and identity
  • Queer theory and LGBTQ studies
  • Nationalism and transnationalism
  • Central and Eastern Europe, particularly Poland
  • Qualitative research methods
Dr Mark Taylor
m.r.taylor@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield Methods Institute

Mark is a sociologist with interests in social stratification and inequality, the sociology of culture, particularly music, and the life course, with methodological interests in survey research, social network analysis, and geographic information systems. Before arriving at Sheffield, Mark worked at the Universities of Manchester and York, and studied at Oxford, where he received his DPhil under the supervision of Tak Wing Chan.

He's affiliated to the large AHRC-funded project Understanding Everyday Participation: Articulating Cultural Values (PI Andrew Miles, Manchester) where he was previously a full-time researcher, to the ERC-funded project Music, Digitisation, Mediation: Towards Interdisciplinary Music Studies (PI Georgina Born, Oxford), and he's a co-investigator on the AHRC-funded project Connecting Epistemologies: Methods and Early Career Researchers in the Connected Communities Programme (PI Dave O'Brien, City).

Dr Graham Williams
g.t.williams@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of English Language and Linguistics

Research interests

Broadly speaking, my specialty is Late Medieval and Early Modern English language, and my research methods are derived from historical linguistics, especially pragmatics. In particular, I have worked extensively with manuscript and digital letter collections in order to study actual English, dating from c.1400-1650.

I also have strong research interests in manuscript studies, paleography, digital editing and corpora - in particular the implications these perspectives have for the historical study of language.

At the moment, I am developing research on: 1) the history of verbal irony (e.g. sarcasm, mock (im)politeness and banter) in English, as evidenced by both literary and non-literary texts; and 2) the letters and language of Margaret Tudor (1489-1541), princess of England and Queen of Scots.

Dr Ashley Willis
A.P.Willis@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

Research interests

* Patterns in fluid flows and their stability to perturbations.

* Transition to turbulence and chaos in shear flows.

* Generation of magnetic fields by the motion of fluids, e.g. the geodynamo.

* Founder of - openpipeflow.org -


A description of the mathematics behind the following videos can be found here.

I am interested in supervising motivated students with a strong mathematical background, in applying their knowledge and learning new techniques for the study of dynamical systems. An excellent setting for new methods, perhaps the traditional test-bed, is the modelling of fluid flows. Unexpected transitions in flow patterns and chaotic behaviour are commonplace, and our understanding of nature is greatly enhanced through numerical simulation and experiments. I am particularly interested in the appearance of turbulence in fluid flows, and modelling of the flows inside planets. The latter is usually responsible for the generation of planetary magnetic fields. For further information please contact me. The following links may also be of interest: Turbulence. Dynamos.

Dr Ben Partridge
b.m.partridge@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemistry

Research Interests

Research in the Partridge group focuses on the development of new methods for the synthesis of organic molecules. We design our methods to make chiral molecules, controlling the stereochemistry in our reactions. To achieve this, we use our two main interests: catalysis and organoboron chemistry. Ultimately our work aims to:

  • make it easier for chemists to synthesise libraries of complex molecules.
  • improve the sustainability of organic synthesis.

Catalytic Transformations of Alkylboron Reagents

Organoboron reagents have been described as the “Universal Functional Group” as they undergo a wide range of transformations while exhibiting broad functional group compatibility. In particular, arylboronic acids are used in many catalytic C–C and C–heteroatom bond forming reactions, e.g. the Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling (awarded the 2010 Nobel Prize). In contrast, transformations of alkylboronic esters are highly underdeveloped, often requiring harsh conditions.

We aim to develop new, mild catalytic transformations of alkylboron reagents, particularly new amination and halogenation reactions. These reactions should be stereoselective, using the inherent stereochemistry of the alkylboron, or through catalyst control. Building a toolbox of catalytic transformations of alkylboronic esters will ultimately allow us to generate libraries of compounds from common alkylboron precursors. This approach has potential applications in drug and agrochemical discovery.

Frustrated Lewis Pairs as Green Catalysts

Normally if you combine a Lewis acid and Lewis base, a neutralisation reaction occurs. However, by building steric hindrance around either the Lewis acid or Lewis base (or both), neutralisation can be prevented. Instead you get a highly polarised complex known as a Frustrated Lewis Pair (FLP). These species have been shown to have many interesting properties, such as the ability to spilt H2 and catalyse hydrogenation reactions. 

We are interested in designing new FLP catalysts for metal-free hydrogenation. This area has potential to make a significant impact towards making organic synthesis more sustainable. FLPs, derived from cheap, readily available main-group elements could replace traditional transition metal catalysts, which are comparably more scarce, expensive and toxic

Dr Abongeh Tunyi
A.Tunyi@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Abongeh Tunyi holds a B.Sc in Accounting (University of Buea), Master of Finance (MFin) with distinction (University of Glasgow), a PhD in Finance & Accounting (University of Glasgow) and a Post Graduate Certificate in Learning & Teaching in Higher Education (Liverpool Hope university). He is also a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (FHEA). Prior to Joining the Management School, Tunyi was a Lecturer in Accounting & Finance at Liverpool Hope University.

Teaching

Tunyi has previously taught modules in Corporate Finance, International Finance, Quantitative Methods, Management Accounting and Financial Management. He is currently the module leader for Issues in Finance (MGT6091). This module explores contemporary research and practice in advanced corporate finance and modern investment management. The module covers areas such as asset pricing, portfolio management, empirical methods (particularly, event prediction) in finance, behavioral finance, mergers & acquisitions, value relevance of CSR and CG strategies, and firm financing decisions.

 

Research

Corporate Finance, capital markets, mergers & acquisitions (M&A), bankruptcies, Corporate governance, Investment analysis and strategies, Corporate Finance & market-based accounting in emerging economies.

PhD Supervision

Tunyi welcomes PhD applications in all areas of his research interests.He is particularly interested in supervising projects in the areas of Mergers & Acquisitions and Corporate Finance & market-based accounting in emerging economies

Publications

Danbolt, J., Siganos, A. and Tunyi, A. (2016). Abnormal Returns form Takeover Prediction Modelling: Challenges and Suggested Investment Strategies. Journal of Business Finance and Accounting, 43(1-2) 66-97.

Tunyi, A. and Ntim, C. (2016). Location Advantage? Governance Quality, Stock Market Development and Firm Characteristics as Antecedents of African M&As. Journal of International Management, 22(2) 147-167.

Professor Graham Leggett
graham.leggett@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemistry

Introduction

Our work centres on the structures, properties and reactivity of molecular surfaces (organic thin films and monolayers) on nanometre length scales. There are two principal foci: nanofabrication (the construction of molecular objects smaller than 100 nm) with a particular emphasis on nanoscale biological interfaces (the organisation of biomolecules, and the study of their structure and function, on molecular length scales); and nanotribology (the study of sliding contacts between nanometre scale molecular objects).

Nanofabrication

The integration of top-down (lithographic) with bottom-up (synthetic chemical) methodologies remains a major challenge in molecular nanoscience. There is a critical length range, between ca. 100 nm and the dimensions of a single biomacromolecule, in which there are few established methods for the execution of chemically specific molecular transformations. Our work on nanofabrication revolves around the use of photochemical methods to execute selective molecular transformations in nanometre-scale regions at surfaces. Photochemistry is an attractive tool, because organic chemistry furnishes us with a wide choice of photochemical strategies, and because photolithography remains the go-to fabrication tool many years after its eventual demise was predicted. The challenge is to find ways to execute photochemical transformations on nanometre length scales. We have found that near-field methods yield exquisite control at length-scales down to a few tens of nm, and interferometric lithography offers remarkable performance over macroscopic areas via fast, inexpensive, simple approaches. Interferometric techniques have enabled us to fabricate dense arrays of structures as small as 25 nm covering square cm regions. Arrays of gold nanostructures have been used in spectroscopic investigations of light-harvesting complexes, and have led to the exciting discovery of strong coupling between localised surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) and excitons in these molecules.

Nanotribology

Tribology is the study of sliding contacts between materials, and includes the phenomena of friction and wear. Our particular interest is in nanometre-scale contacts between molecular materials. Nanometre-scale sliding contacts are important for a variety of reasons; the following are examples:

  • Miniaturised devices, such as microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), rely upon tiny mechanical contacts, and the lubrication of these presents substantial problems - a drop of oil will not suffice! Organic thin films and monolayers may provide solutions.
  • Macroscopic materials may have properties that depend on microscopic sliding interactions. For example, conditioners in laundry formulations are used to modify the sliding interactions at tiny contacts between between textile fibres that are only a few micrometres in diameter (see below).
  • Measurements of the tribological properties of surfaces at nanometre length scales provide a powerful means for mapping variations in chemical structure and composition; friction force microscopy is an invaluable tool for the characterisation of molecular nanostructures (see nanofabrication page).
  • Studies of tribological phenomena may yield insights into the fundamental nature of forces at surfaces; a current focus in our research is exploring the relationship between nanotribology and the thermodynamics of non-covalent molecular interactions.

Surface Analysis

I am director of the Sheffield Surface Analysis Centre (SSAC) which is home to a variety of state-of-the-art surface characterisation equipment, including an imaging secondary ion mass spectrometer and two X-ray photoelectron spectrometers.

Dr Erica Ballantyne
e.e.ballantyne@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research

 

Erica is a member of the Logistics and Supply Chain Management (LSCM) Research Centre, and the Centre for Energy, Environment and Sustainability (CEES), and the Advanced Resource Efficiency Centre (AREC) here at the University of Sheffield.

Research interests include: Sustainable urban freight transport and logistics operations; city logistics; sustainable urban supply chains; and local authority freight transport planning and policy decision making. She welcomes exploring future collaborations with industry partners and research academics.

Prospective PhD candidates

Erica is interested in supervising doctoral students in the field of logistics, freight transport and supply chain management. In particular, she is keen to supervise students who have an interest in using qualitative methods in logistics related research. Prospective PhD students with related research interests are invited to send a research proposal and a CV for consideration.

Publications

Ballantyne, E.E.F., Lindholm, M. and Whiteing, A.W. (2013). A comparative study of urban freight transport planning: addressing stakeholder needs. Journal of Transport Geography, 32 93- 101.

Ballantyne, E.E.F. and Boodoo, A. (2010). Freight in an Eco-town: How does freight fit into eco-town planning? Logistics and Transport Focus, 12(6) 28-32.

Full list of publications

Professor Fiona Boissonade
f.boissonade@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

I have a major research interest in the mechanisms of altered neuronal excitability that occur under the pathological conditions of nerve injury and inflammation, and which contribute to the development of chronic pain, including that in the oro–facial region. Much of this research has been done at the academic–industrial interface. Collaborations with GSK, Pfizer and Eli Lilly have funded a wide range of pre-clinical translational studies, using pre-clinical models and human tissues to identify and validate a range of regulators of neuronal excitability as potential targets for the development of novel analgesics and anti-inflammatory mediators.

Other research projects are directed towards improvement of nerve regeneration. This work investigates methods of improving nerve repair through the use of a range of anti-inflammatory and anti-scarring agents, and includes collaboration with the Department of Engineering Materials at the University of Sheffield to develop bioengineered conduits to enhance nerve regeneration. In other projects I collaborate with the Sheffield Institute for Translational Neuroscience (SITraN) investigating the role of chemokines in CNS disease.
I also have a significant research interest in neural–immune interactions and their role in the development of disease. I have a number of pilot projects underway in this field investigating neural interactions in the generation of cancer pain and tumour progression.

Professor John Brazier
j.e.brazier@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

SF-6D preference-based index

  • Developed by Brazier et al (2002). Syntax files available fromhttp://www.shef.ac.uk/scharr/sections/heds/mvh/sf-6d
  • International valuation studies in Japan, Hong Kong, Portugal, Brazil, Australia and Singapore
  • Comparisons to other generic preference-based measures

Deriving preference-based measures from condition specific measures

  • Published studies: Kings Health Questionnaire, Atopic Dermatitis in Children, Menopausal specific health related quality of life questionnaire, Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire, Overactive Bladder Questionnaire, Sexual Functioning Questionnaire.
  • Current studies: Dementia Quality of Life (DEMQoL), Epilepsy QoL battery.

Modelling preference data

  • Applying Bayesian methods to estimating preference-based algorithms
  • Estimating health state values from ordinal data (rank and DCE)

Validity of EQ-5D across medical conditions.

Mapping from condition specific and other generic measures onto EQ-5D

  • Recent and ongoing trial based economic evaluations: Complementary therapy (YACBAC trial), treatments for varicose veins, computerised cognitive behavioural therapy in MS, Borderline Personality Disorder (SPeDi trial)
  • Model based economic evaluations: computerised cognitive behavioural therapy (NICE), Dialectical behavioural therapy for Borderline Personality Disorder (HTA)

Examining the relationship between health and well-being (and the role of adaptation)

Dr Penny Breeze

Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Penny is currently a research associate in ScHARR within the Health Economics and Decision Modelling Section. Penny has been at ScHARR for over 4 years, first as a PhD student and more recently working as a health economics modeller. Before working in ScHARR Penny was working as a health economics consultant at IMS Health developing cost-effectiveness models for pharmaceutical products. The subject of her thesis was to investigate the use of health economic models to develop drug development programmes for new treatments for systemic lupus erythematosus. Since working at ScHARR Penny has been working on a project funded by the School for Public Health Research (SPHR) to provide a coherent, model based framework for the evaluation of strategies for the prevention of type 2 diabetes. Penny has developed a new cost-effectiveness model to evaluate a broad range of type-2 diabetes prevention interventions in the United Kingdom. Penny's research interests are in methods for longitudinal data analysis for use in decision-analytic modelling. Specifically in complex natural history models with multiple dynamic risk factors.

Mr Dermot Breslin
D.Breslin@Sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

Following the completion of his PhD in 2009, the specific focus of Dermot's research has been to develop an evolutionary approach to study changing behaviour in organisations (see www.learningtoevolve.com). To date he has published and reviewed papers in a number of international peer-reviewed journals and conferences. Dermot has also acted as guest editor for the International Journal of Organizational Analysis, Journal of Management & Governance, is associate editor with the International Journal of Management Reviews, and has co-organised evolutionary tracks at the EURAM annual conference. Dermot remains closely engaged with practice through consulting/research projects. These projects focus on the emergence and evolution of key competences and routines within organizations. In this ongoing research Dermot is working on a variety of approaches including longitudinal ethnographical studies, experimental methods and agent-based simulation modeling techniques.

Dermot is interested in supervising PhD students in the following broad areas:

  • Evolutionary approaches in socio-economic change
  • The emergence and evolution of behaviors in organizations
  • Organisational adaptation and ambidexterity
  • Organisational co-evolution and multi-level studies


Dr Yu Chen
yu.chen@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of East Asian Studies

Research interests

Dr Chen’s research interests are in China’s urbanisation and rural-to-urban migration. China is experiencing the largest migration wave in human history, with hundreds of millions of people moving from the countryside to cities to seek better life. She is interested in the social, economic, spatial and environmental consequences of such massive urbanisation.

She is currently working on the following projects:

ESRC/CASS Urban Transformations: Urban Development, Migration, Segregation and Inequality (2015--2018). This project aims to bring together researchers from the University of Glasgow, University of Sheffield and the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, to develop new ideas, innovative methods and analysis on the impacts of migration on urban development, the related social-spatial segregation and public policy challenges.

ESRC/GCRF: Dynamics of Health & Environmental Inequalities in Hebei Province, China (2017–2018). This project aims to develop the data infrastructure and to examine the social and health impacts of rapid urbanisation and air pollution, in order to improve decision support tools for economic and social policy.

She is also interested in rural-to-urban migrants and their life prospects. Her previous projects examined the aspirations and socio-economic integration of new-generation migrants in urban China.

She welcomes applications from prospective PhD students in the fields of urbanisation, migration, urban development and housing.

Dr Tim Craggs
t.craggs@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemistry

Research Interests

Single-molecule approaches provide unprecedented detail to the understanding of essential biological processes, as was recognized in the awarding of the 2014 Nobel Prize for Chemistry. Their unique advantage stems from the ability to go beyond the ensemble- and time-averaging of common biochemical techniques, enabling the identification and interpretation of asynchronous reactions, transient states, and rare sub-species.

ResTDC

Research in the Craggs Lab involves the development and application of single-molecule fluorescence techniques to addressing crucial questions across physics, chemistry and the life sciences.

Recent work has focussed on the development and application of single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET – a molecular ruler for the 30-90 Å scale) to questions of protein folding, and DNA transcription, replication and repair. These methods are capable of observing individual molecules and molecular interactions in real time, and understanding their dynamics.

In addition to this mechanistic work, we have shown we can use smFRET to measure absolute distances with angstrom accuracy, opening the door to FRET driven structural biology.

Professor Jeremy Dawson
J.F.Dawson@Sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

Jeremy's research falls broadly into three areas, with plenty of crossover between them – management of health care organisations, team working, and statistics. Recent projects in health care include a study of the effects of NHS staff engagement and experience on patient outcomes; various studies of team working in health care, particularly in mental health services; an examination of the effects of organisational restructuring in the NHS; and a project looking at the diversity of hospital staff and their representativeness of the local community. In 2014 he begins an NIHR-funded study evaluating Schwartz Center Rounds® in the NHS.

As well as teams in health care, he has a more general interest in team diversity, and in particular how it should be measured. As a statistician he has also undertaken a wide range of methodological research, particularly regarding interpretation of interaction effects, measurement of diversity, analysis of incomplete team data, and the effects of aggregation on relationships. He has published over 30 papers in refereed academic journals in the fields of psychology, management, health care and research methods, as well as numerous project reports and articles in practitioner publications. He is an editorial board member of five journals, and an Associate Editor of the Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology.

Dr Joel Foreman
j.foreman@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Materials Science and Engineering
A combination of experimental and modelling approaches to polymer and polymer composite science. Development of experimental structure property relationships in polymers of use in the composites industry, primarily epoxy and phenolic resins. Various modelling techniques for predicting material properties ranging from continuum to atomistic and some finite element methods. 

Research interests
  • Tailoring the structure of epoxy resins by altering the resin/hardener chemistry and stoichiometry to understand how the chemical structure influences thermo-mechanical properties.
  • Tailoring the structure of phenolic resins by altering the reactant stoichiometry, cure schedule and catalysts to understand how the chemical structure influences thermo-mechanical properties.
  • Monitoring epoxy and phenolic resin cure through DSC, DEA and NIR to understand how the curing reactions influence the final structure of thermosetting resins.
  • Manufacture and mechanical property testing of composite panels based on epoxy and phenolic resins in order to improve properties by tailoring the properties of the matrix phase.
  • Group Interaction Modelling of polymer properties.
  • Multi-scale modelling of polymer composites using Group Interaction Modelling for material properties of the fibre and matrix combined with FEA and statistical fibre failure model for composite properties.
  • Predicting and measuring the effect diluents (e.g. water) have on polymer and polymer composite properties.
Professor Robert Harrison
r.f.harrison@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering

Research interests:

Computational Data Modelling: neural networks; machine learning; kernel machines; support vector machines; generalised linear models; clustering; dimensionality reduction; pattern recognition; pattern classification; pattern discrimination; regression; function approximation; Bayesian analysis; Gaussian processes; system identification; Volterra series; polynomial models; NARX/NARMAX modelling; parsimony; sparsity control; covariate selection; model selection; structure detection; iterative majorization; majorize/minimize algorithms; minorize/maximize algorithms; kernel density estimation; missing/incomplete data problems; EM methods; extended Kalman filtering; unscented Kalman filtering; nonstationary random processes.

Applications: clinical decision support; identification of acute coronary syndromes; chest pain diagnosis; prediction of treatment failure and complications in diabetes sufferers; trauma prognosis; space weather forecasting; geomagnetic storm prediction; analysis of thyroid function; analysis of biological pathways; computational drug discovery; virtual screening; chronobiology; circadian rhythm analysis;  optimal therapy scheduling via non-linear optimal control; prognosis in complex technological systems e.g. gas turbine engine systems;

Dr Ruth Herbert
r.herbert@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Human Communication Sciences
Health Sciences School

Research interests

Since 2001 I have been researching word-finding difficulties in aphasia, supported by grants from the Tavistock Trust for Aphasia, the Stroke Association, and the Health Foundation. 

The main aims are to:

  • improve diagnosis through the refinement of assessment in noun syntax
  • improve our knowledge of aphasia in other languages in particular in Arabic
  • expand the evidence base of effective rehabilitation methods including phonological and orthographic therapy, interactional therapy, and noun syntax therapy
  • develop novel forms of intervention such as STAR software incorporating noun syntax
  • devise new outcome measures for anomia and aphasia such as the POWERS assessment

A relatively new strand of research, supported by grants from the Stroke Association and from South Yorkshire CLAHRC, investigates access to health information for people with aphasia. To date we have:

  • developed accessible information guidelines for staff working with people with aphasia
  • produced a template for making information accessible
  • delivered specific images and text to the Stroke Association, which they are producing as a clinical resource to help people with aphasia and their families
Dr Ruth Herbert
r.herbert@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Human Communication Sciences (old code)

Research interests

Since 2001 I have been researching word-finding difficulties in aphasia, supported by grants from the Tavistock Trust for Aphasia, the Stroke Association, and the Health Foundation. 

The main aims are to:

  • improve diagnosis through the refinement of assessment in noun syntax
  • improve our knowledge of aphasia in other languages in particular in Arabic
  • expand the evidence base of effective rehabilitation methods including phonological and orthographic therapy, interactional therapy, and noun syntax therapy
  • develop novel forms of intervention such as STAR software incorporating noun syntax
  • devise new outcome measures for anomia and aphasia such as the POWERS assessment

A relatively new strand of research, supported by grants from the Stroke Association and from South Yorkshire CLAHRC, investigates access to health information for people with aphasia. To date we have:

  • developed accessible information guidelines for staff working with people with aphasia
  • produced a template for making information accessible
  • delivered specific images and text to the Stroke Association, which they are producing as a clinical resource to help people with aphasia and their families


Dr Mordechai Katzman
M.Katzman@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

Dr Katzman's research is in the area of commutative algebra. Specifically, he is interested in the following. 

Characteristic p methods:

Certain theorems in algebra can be proved by showing that they hold in positive characteristic, and in characteristic p one has extra structure given by the Frobenius map xxp. There are several tools, notably tight closure, which exploit this extra structure to prove some remarkable theorems. 

Local cohomology modules:

This modules derive their importance partly from the fact that they detect interesting properties of modules over commutative rings (e.g., depth.) Unfortunately, these objects tend to be very big are rather mysterious. It is very difficult to describe them in any detail even in seemingly easy cases. Dr. Katzman has recently been producing both examples showing that these objects are more complicated than previously conjectured but also instances where they can be understood fairly well. 

Combinatorial aspects:

One of the simplest family of modules imaginable are monomial ideals in polynomial rings and, perhaps surprisingly, these objects have a very rich structure, in some sense richer than the structure of graphs. Dr Katzman has recently been studying certain monomial ideals associated with graphs a discovering some surprising connections between the algebraic and combinatorial properties of these objects.

Dr Ali Khurram
s.a.khurram@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

My main research interest is in the interaction of chemokine receptors and their ligands in the pathogenesis of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). During my Masters and PhD., I have studied the expression and role of various receptors including CXCR4 (receptor for CXCL12/SDF-1alpha), CXCR1 and CXCR2 (receptors for CXCL8/IL8) and XCR1 (receptor for XCL1/lymphotactin). My PhD findings showed the expression of the XCR1 receptor outside the immune system and on epithelial cells for the first time where it facilitated cancer cell signalling, migration, invasion, proliferation in addition to stimulating adhesion to ECM components and release of Matrix Metalloproteinases. I am also currently looking at the role of XCR1 and lymphotactin interaction in OSCC metastasis and involved in a study to design an antagonist for XCR1 in liaison with the Chemical Engineering department.
My main clinical research interest is studying extracapsular spread in OSCC as it reduces the 5-year patient survival by 80-85%. In addition, I have also been working on a number of collaborative projects for reducing postoperative salivary leakage in Head and Neck Cancer Resection patients. I am also involved with testing and optimisation of cancer treatment drugs and novel methods of delivery to reduce the associated side effects. In addition, I am also involved in numerous clinical audits/interventions with my surgical colleagues.

Professor Dorothea Kleine
d.j.kleine@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Geography

• Sustainable and just development futures in the global South (and North)
• Information and communication technologies for development (ICT4D)
• Digital Geographies and digital participatory methods 
• Ethics of ICT-related development interventions, inclusive innovation and data ethics
• The capabilities approach and sustainable development
• Sustainable/ethical consumption research, food geographies, trade justice and Fair Trade

Themes such as participation, gender, justice and choice run strongly through my work. I have conducted research in Latin America (Brazil; Chile), Europe (UK, Germany), South Asia (India) and Africa (Kenya; South Africa).

I am strongly committed to research which is both academically excellent and can have a positive impact in the context of the global challenges we face today. Thus my work includes participatory action research in partnership with local communities and marginalised groups, theoretical reflections on the need to redefine “development”, evaluation of NGO programmes, as well as scientific advisory roles and speaking at global policy conferences.

Dr Nils Krone
n.krone@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism

Research interests

His main clinical interests are inborn errors of steroidogenesis, congenital adrenal hyperplasia, disorders of sex development (DSD), and PCOS; his main research interests are on inborn errors of steroid hormone biosynthesis and steroid hormone metabolism in health and disease.

Current efforts of his work concentrate on the implementation of model systems to study genetic variants and the integration of diagnostic methods in adrenal disease and DSD. His group has implemented various in vitro assays to study enzymatic defects in steroidogenesis. The most recent work of his group explores the consequences of disrupted steroid hormone synthesis and action on whole organism employing zebrafish as a model organism in translational steroid hormone research (Endocrinology 2013; Endocrinology 2016). This research is based at the Bateson Centre.

The main focus of this clinical research program is on CAH. He leads on a multicentre, 17 tertiary paediatric endocrine centres in the UK, NIHR RD TRC funded project to establish the evidence basis on the current health status in children and young people with congenital adrenal hyperplasia in the UK. In addition, he works on a program to improve health care deliver for children and young people with adrenal conditions and DSD.

Professor Karina Nielsen
K.m.nielsen@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Karina is an experienced PhD supervisor, she has supervised students in different countries in the areas of work and wellbeing, organizational interventions and return to work. 

She is interested in supervising projects on:

Bottom-up job design, including how employees can shape their own work environment to create an environment that allows them to thrive at work and perform well.

Organizational interventions involve making changes to the way work is organized, designed and managed to improve employee wellbeing. Of particular interest is how we can design and implement such interventions through creating collaborative networks between managers and employees. Understanding the process of implementing change also requires sophisticated evaluation methods that allow us to develop our understanding of what works for whom in which circumstances. 

Also projects of interest are how we can help employees with clients money mental health problems return to work and stay at work. 

Karina also has an interest in leadership and wellbeing. This includes understanding the role of line managers in ensuring a good working environment for their employees and the impact of these on employee wellbeing. Projects relating the leadership training and evaluation are particularly welcome  as are projects exploring the dark side of leadership.

Finally, projects on the impact of organizational restructuring and wellbeing and how organisations can implement change that also consider the process of change are welcome. 

Professor Beth Perry
b.perry@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Urban Studies and Planning

Beth’s research focuses on critically interrogating and developing pathways to more just sustainable urban futures. She focusses on urban governance, transformation and the roles of universities, with an emphasis on socio-environmental and socio-cultural transitions.

She is currently leading three major UK projects focussed on co-producing urban transformations, with a team of researchers working across the Urban Institute and Sheffield Methods Institute:

  • Jam and Justice: Co-producing Urban Governance for Social Innovation is a three-year project funded by the ESRC Urban Transformations programme, with partners at the Greater Manchester Centre for Voluntary Organisation and the Universities of Manchester and Birmingham.
  • Whose Knowledge Matters? Competing and Contesting Knowledge Claims in 21st Century Cities is a collaboration between the University of Sheffield and University of Twente in the Netherlands funded by the Open Research Area initiative and focussed on citizen knowledges in sustainable urban development projects.
  • Realising Just Cities is the four-year international collaboration programme of Mistra Urban Futures focussed on Greater Manchester and the Sheffield City-Region.
Dr Alice Pyne
a.l.pyne@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

Alice’s expertise is in high resolution single-molecule microscopy. She has achieved unprecedented resolution for single biomolecules in solution through the development of new Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) methods in collaboration with Bruker (CA, USA). Her research has resulted in both the highest-quality AFM images of the DNA double helix achieved to date, and the first visualisation of variations in the DNA double helix structure on a single molecule. Alice's research exploits these techniques to improve our understanding of DNA structure, interactions, and therapeutics.


Through close interdisciplinary collaboration we work to determine to develop new ways to determine how the complexity of biomolecular structure relates to its function. Major avenues of research include:

  • Development of high resolution AFM techniques
  • Combining high resolution AFM with other single molecule techniques
  • Determination of DNA structure under superhelical stress
  • Understanding how variations in DNA structure affect DNA-protein interactions
  • Evaluation of novel therapeutics
Professor Ning Qin
n.qin@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

The Aerodynamics Research Group's interest is in the development and application of computational aerodynamic tools to a wide range of industrial problems in aerospace, automotive, and environmental industries. These advanced tools provide in-depth analyses and design optimisation for engineering products, such as aircraft wing drag reduction, racing car down force enhancement, and gas turbine and wind turbine blade efficiency improvement.

The aerodynamic analysis and design tools vary from very fast panel methods to popular commercial CFD packages, from the most advanced adjoint method for optimisation (adj-MERLIN) to the detached eddy simulation software (DGDES) for massively separated turbulent flows, developed within the group.

Current projects include: flow separation control, shock control for drag reduction, adjoint based shape optimisation for transonic wing performance, hybrid RANS/LES for synthetic jet, VG and plasma flow control, MAV low Reynolds number aerodynamics, and feature aligned adaptive mesh techniques. 

Dr Muhammad Saddiq
M.I.Saddiq@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

Broad research interests:

My research interests are in the areas health policy and systems where I draw on my doctoral research and extensive experience working in this area in Nigeria (has worked for significant periods in all three tiers of government) and West Africa providing technical assistance to government officials at all levels in implementing strategies to strengthen health systems and deliver disease prevention and control programs.  I have worked with national, regional and local governments in design, implementation and evaluation of malaria control and health systems strengthening programs.  I have been involved in complex negotiations with different private sector suppliers of health commodities, addressing cost barriers to access for consumers as well as addressing prescriber behaviour in Nigeria, Ghana and Mali.  I have also worked with an international NGO in deployment of new and effective technologies in addressing high burden, high impact conditions in sub-Saharan Africa.

Methods I can supervise: 

Case studies

Specific Areas of Interest:

Health Systems Management

Dr Ranjan Sen
ranjan.sen@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of English Language and Linguistics

Research interests

My primary research interest lies in developing techniques to reconstruct and account for phonological change over time, and investigating to what extent synchronic structure plays a role in diachronic phonology. One aim is to improve methods used to access fine-grained phonetic evidence from dead languages, to allow a better evaluation of theories of change grounded in phonetics. We can then better address the much-debated question of whether phonetics and analogical pressures alone drive sound change, or if structural constraints play a role.

My current research focuses on three areas: (1) investigating the role played by prosodic structure in sound change, examining the roles of syllable and foot structure in Latin and other languages; (2) working in collaboration with Professor Joan Beal (University of Sheffield) and Dr Nura Yáñez-Bouza (University of Manchester) to construct a database of eighteenth-century English phonology from contemporary sources, (e.g. pronouncing dictionaries), in order to address problems in English phonology, both historical and contemporary; (3) working in collaboration with the Oxford Phonetics Laboratory to investigate theories of speech production and phonological representation in the mind, from the evidence of reading aloud non-words, examining questions of both phonological and psycholinguistic significance.


Professor Mark Strong
m.strong@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My Research interests

I have three related research interests that fall under the general banner of Uncertainty Quantification: (1) how do we properly account for all relevant uncertainties when we build a computer model of a physical, biological or social system? (2) how do we (efficiently) compute value of information? (3) how do we work out the value of a computer model? How much should we pay to make a simple model more complex? When do we stop increasing the complexity of a model?

Jeremy OakleyJim Chilcott and I have proposed an "internal" discrepancy-based method for managing model uncertainty. See this paper in JRSS Series C, and this paper in SIAM/ASA Journal of Uncertainty Quantification. The method is discussed in more detail in my PhD thesis.

We have proposed an efficient method for computing partial EVPI. This method works for any number of parameters of interest and requires only the PSA sample. See this open access paper in Medical Decision Making. R functions to implement the method can be downloaded here. This paper uses Gaussian process-based methods that are nicely described in the  Managing Uncertainty in Complex Models (MUCM) toolkit.

The partial EVPI method extends nicely to the computation of EVSI. See here for our open access paper on the efficient computation of EVSI.

Dr Philip Watson
p.f.watson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism
The Medical School

Research interests

My main research interests center on the aetiology of autoimmune disease, with a particular focus on the thyroid. Autoimmune thyroid disease is the most prevalent form of organ-specific autoimmunity in the population and affects approximately 1-2% of individuals. Antigenic targets in autoimmune thyroid disease are well characterised and this, together with the availability of patient material, makes the disease and important model for other forms of autoimmunity. In seeking to better understand the origins of thyroid autoimmunity we have developed techniques to study the nature of the immune response. In particular we have used phage display methods to analyse the autoantibody repertoire of thyroid disease patients.
Recombinant antibody technology is a major component of our research efforts, and we are using this approach in a number of areas, including the analysis of human autoimmune disease and the development of novel therapeutics. Aside from recombinant antibodies we have also employed phage display strategies to identify novel human autoantigens by synthesis and screening of cDNA expression libraries.
In a further development of our research effort we are now employing these techniques commercially in the rational design of novel antibody-based enzyme antagonists for use as therapeutic agents in the treatment of chronic kidney disease. This work is funded by the MRCT.

Dr Lang Yang
l.yang@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism
The Medical School

Research interests

My current research interests are quantifying the effects of osteoporosis and its treatment on bone geometry, bone tissue distribution and structure, and bone mechanical strength, with particular focus on the proximal femur. Development of image processing and analysis methods for medical images is an essential part of my research, so does the structural engineering models generated from medical images. This has resulted in two streamlined analysis software, one for dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and another for quantitative computer tomography of the hip. My research aims are to accurately assess the bone strength non-invasively and to develop diagnostic tools that accurately predict the risk of bone fracture and monitor the treatment effects.

I am also interested in understanding mechanical environment at fracture site and how that modulates biological processes of fracture healing. This involves the determination of mechanical properties of fracture fixation devices by mechanical testing, non-invasive assessment of the mechanical property of healing tissues and computer simulation of fracture healing.

Dr Jennifer Coates
jennifer.coates@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of East Asian Studies

My research and teaching is situated at the intersection of Japanese Studies, Film Studies, History, History of Art, and Anthropology, and can best be characterized as Japanese Cultural Studies.

My wider research interests include Japanese and East Asian cinema, photography, gender studies, filmmaking, and ethnographic methods. I have published on these topics and others in Cultural Studies, Participations, Japanese Studies, Japan Forum, the U. S.-Japan Women’s Journal and The Journal of Japanese and Korean Cinema.

I am developing a book manuscript entitled 'Feelings Without Words: Growing Up With the Cinema in Postwar Japan', based on four years of ethnography in Kyoto, Osaka, and Kobe. The book explores the role of cinema in the development of a sense of self for those who grew up during the Occupation of Japan (1945-1952) and its aftermath. Framed as an ethno-history of cinema attendance and reception in the Kansai region of Western Japan, this original study positions cinema as a discursive object in the living memories of the era. Individual chapters deal with the origin stories of cinema in Japan, gender and the cinema audience, the gap between Occupation authorities’ expectations of the audience and lived experience, and cinema's relation to activism.

Many of my research outputs take a cross-regional and interdisciplinary approach, including publications on Manchurian-Japanese wartime co-production films, postwar Japanese co-productions with Hong-Kong, and transnational star personae. I have conducted research on the simultaneous development of ethno-fiction filmmaking techniques in France and Japan, and on Taiwanese and Korean co-productions set in Tokyo, and co-authored an article on film-motivated tourism in China. I have also collaborated with affect theory specialists in the UK, USA, and Japan, and with a group of art historians in Zurich on two projects on photography. Moving beyond traditional research publication methods, I completed a short documentary titled When Cinema Was King (2018) on the topic of Japanese cinema audiences and their memories.

Before joining SEAS, I studied, researched, and taught in many areas of the world. I was an AHRC Kluge Fellow at the Library of Congress, Washington D.C. (2012), a Visiting Research Fellow at the Australian National University (2011), Assistant Professor at the Hakubi Center for Advanced Research, Kyoto University (2014-2018), and Senior Lecturer in Japanese Arts, Cultures, and Heritage at the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures at the University of East Anglia.

Dr Joab Winkler
j.r.winkler@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Computer Science

Research interests

Joab Winkler’s main research interests are image processing, and  algebraic and numerical properties of curves and surfaces in computer-aided design systems.

  • IMAGE PROCESSING: The removal of blur and other degradations from an image arises in many applications and it may be considered a preprocessing operation before the image is interrogated for, for example, medical diagnosis. The most challenging problem arises when prior information on the source of the degradations and the exact image is not known, in which case the problem is called blind image deconvolution. My research is concerned with the application of polynomial computations, implemented using structure-preserving matrix methods, for the solution of this problem. The next stage of this work on image improvement is its extension from static images to video images for the observation of dynamic events, for example, the flow of blood.
 
  • GEOMETRIC MODELLING: Curves and surfaces in computer aided design systems are represented by polynomials. Computational problems arise because the coefficients of these polynomials are corrupted by noise due to manufacturing tolerances and numerical approximations, and robust computations on polynomials are therefore required. Recent work on these robust computations includes the computation of a structured low rank approximation of the Sylvester resultant matrix, and the devlopment of a polynomial root solver for the determination of multiple roots of the theoretically exact form of a polynomial, when the coefficients of the given polynomial are corrupted by added noise.
 
  • FEATURE SELECTION: Many problems in science require the identification of the most important features that characterise a system, such that the expected response of the system to new data can be accurately predicted. Problems arise because the given data that is available to identify these important features is usually insufficient to define the system uniquely, which implies that the equation to be solved has an infinite number of solutions, This raises the question as to the solution that is selected from this infinite set of solutions, and the criterion used for this selection. My research is concerned with the development of mathematical theory and methods for the selection of the best solution, defined using a specified criterion. The features that characterise a system may be a combination of numerical data, binary data and categorical data, and a mathematical model that describes a system must include these three classes of data. This problem has many applications, including bioinformatics, signal analysis, atmospheric physics, and in general, problems in which the response (output) is a function of many variables (inputs), only some of which are important and must therefore be identified.
Professor Serena Corr
s.corr@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Department of Materials Science and Engineering

Energy storage research:

Moving towards a more electrified world presents considerable energy storage challenges. Amongst these, the development of low cost, durable, high energy density, safe batteries is paramount for delivery of an all-electric vehicle market. A major theme of our research is to develop novel, facile routes to functional materials using our expertise in solid state and wet chemical methods to provide new battery electrodes and electrolytes across a range of chemistries. We apply a comprehensive range of lab- and synchrotron-based techniques to fully interrogate these materials to elucidate their structure and morphology, investigate their physical and dynamic properties and evaluate their electrochemical performance. Specific research projects include:

High nickel-content electrodes for Li-ion batteries: The benefits of moving to high nickel-content electrodes include potentially higher energy densities and reducing the cobalt content, which addresses the ethical implications and cost associated with this metal. Our group work on the synthesis of micron and nanosized NMC variants. Together with our collaborators in the Faraday Institution Degradation project, we investigate degradation mechanisms in these materials through a holistic approach and design methodologies to mitigate those deleterious effects.

Next generation cathode materials for Li-ion batteries: We are interested in new electrode architectures that enhance long-term performance and durability. Our group has experience in core-shell structures, faceted particles and composite materials. We are developing new synthetic strategies for garnering control over particle morphology to interrogate the effect this has on battery performance. We investigate higher nickel content cathodes, disordered materials, polyanionic and high Li content cathodes, in addition to coating strategies for electrode particles.

New materials for safer all solid-state batteries: Current batteries rely on flammable organic electrolytes that are potentially hazardous and limit performance. Research in the Corr group is ongoing to develop new solid ceramic electrolytes which present more stable alternatives and display high ionic conductivities. Classes of materials we currently study include perovskites, garnets, NASICONS and agyrodites.

Developing microwave approaches to battery materials: Post-processing of novel metallorganic precursors can afford nanostructured materials. By careful design, nanoparticles with specific properties may be tailored. This opens up a ‘bottom-up’ design approach to new materials. We are interested in new heterometallic precursors which afford the opportunity to tune stoichiometries and resulting particle shape.

Chemistries beyond Li-ion: Magnesium-ion batteries represent a potentially transformative approach to current electrochemical energy storage technologies yet their translation to market remains hindered due to a lack of appropriate candidate cathode materials. Our group is developing new Mg-ion cathode materials, in combination with new electrolyte systems.

Materials for Conservation

Working with collaborators at the Mary Rose Trust, we are designing a new approach to the conservation of Mary Rose artefacts, going beyond current methods where potential acid sources remain in the wood through the use of smart multifunctional magnetic nanocomposites. These target and remove harmful entities lodged inside wooden structures. We can direct magnetic nanoparticles to desired areas inside the wood, optimising the removal of harmful species. We use state-of-the-art synchrotron tools to evaluate the structure and speciation of species found within these priceless artefacts.

Dr Sarah Brooks
s.brooks@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Sarah joined the University of Sheffield in 2012 after being awarded a Management and Business Development fellowship jointly funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), the UK Commission for Employment and Skills (UKCES) and the Society for the Advancement of Management Studies (SAMS). The fellowship was designed to improve practitioner experience within the academic field. In December 2015, Sarah became a full-time lecturer in Organisational Behaviour with specific focus on Occupational Psychology, Human Resource Management and Leadership.
Prior to joining the University, Sarah held a number of positions in the fields of operations management and management consultancy, leading change management projects in both the private and public sector. She is currently in the fourth year of a PhD at the Institute of Work Psychology focusing on understanding the role of formality on upward challenge in the UK Police Service.

Research

Sarah’s research interests include all aspects of voice and silence and organisational communication. As a qualitative researcher, Sarah is keen to use innovative and unique methods designed to provide insight into cognitive and mental models of individual behaviour such as card sort, repertory grid and thinking aloud technique.

PhD Supervision

Sarah is interested in hearing from anyone interested in studying voice and silence or wider communication issues in the workplace.

Working with Organisations and Public Engagement

If you are interested in knowing more about the reasons why employees don’t speak up to their managers, or why managers might not encourage voice, please contact me. I am happy to run workshops designed to raise awareness of these issues. If you would like to work with me on a piece of research in your organisation, I would also be delighted to hear from you.

Publications

Brooks, S. (2014). Understanding workplace voice and silence. European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology in Practice, 6 26-38.

Full list of publications

 

Professor Iain Coldham
i.coldham@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemistry

Research Interests

New methodology in organic chemistry.

Synthetic chemistry depends on reliable, high-yielding and selective reactions that access a wide variety of different structures. The discovery of new methods in synthesis is crucial to expand the range of novel compounds that can be made easily. Especially important is the development of new carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions. Our research group is studying the use of organometallic compounds in asymmetric synthesis, especially for carbon-carbon bond formation of nitrogen-containing compounds, prevalent in many biologically active molecules. We have found that 2-lithiopyrrolidines, piperidines and other cyclic amines undergo dynamic resolution in the presence of a chiral ligand (L*), leading to highly enantioenriched 2-substituted cyclic amine products. We have determined the kinetics of enantiomerization of several chiral organolithium compounds.

Synthesis of biologically active compounds.

We are using dipolar cycloaddition chemistry to access a variety of alkaloid structures. Intramolecular cycloadditions provide an efficient means to build up bicyclic and polycyclic ring systems in a rapid and stereocontrolled way. We have shown that this chemistry is applicable to the synthesis of the core ring system of the alkaloid manzamine A, which has significant biological activity (anti-cancer, anti-malarial, and other activity). One dipole that we use is an azomethine ylide, that we make by condensation of a secondary amine with an aldehyde. Intramolecular cycloaddition sets up two new rings and up to four new stereocentres in a single step. We have prepared simpler analogues of manzamine A and other heteroaromatic compounds to probe their biological activity.

Recently, we have found that primary amines (such as amino-acids, amino-esters, hydroxylamine) can be used to condense with an aldehyde and promote a cascade process involving imine formation, cyclization, ylide formation and cycloaddition all in one pot. This chemistry provides an efficient method to prepare three rings directly from an acyclic aldehyde in a stereocontrolled way and has been applied to the total syntheses of several alkaloids (such as aspidospermidine, aspidospermine, quebrachamine and myrioxazine A).

Professor Susan Fitzmaurice
S.Fitzmaurice@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of English Language and Linguistics

Research interests

Fitzmaurice's research focuses on the history of the English language, using methodological perspectives provided by historical pragmatics and historical sociolinguistics. She is particularly interested in exploring the methods and kinds of evidence employed in historical approaches to language study.

She is currently focussing on semantic change and exploring different approaches to historical semantics. She recently delivered the plenary lecture at SHEL 8 (Studies in the History of the English Language) in Utah on the role of contingent polysemy in the changing meanings of politeness in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries (summer 2013).

Her research on English in the eighteenth century utilizes the frameworks of social networks analysis, corpus linguistics, and discourse analysis. Her data are drawn principally from the Network of Eighteenth century English texts (NEET). This is a large unconventional historical electronic corpus of letters, fiction, prose drama and essays produced by Joseph Addison and the members of his social milieu.

Fitzmaurice is currently investigating on the history of the English language in colonial and post-colonial Zimbabwe. The first publication in the project on the history and structure of the colonial variety, ' L1Rhodesian English', appears in The Lesser-Known Varieties of English, (eds.) Daniel Schreier, Peter Trudgill, Edgar W. Schneider, & Jeffrey P. Williams. Cambridge University Press (2010), pp. 263-285. She has also contributed a chapter on White Zimbabwean English (WhZimE) to the Mouton World Atlas of Variation in English (WAVE), 2013.

She has received British Academy support to investigate undocumented varieties of spoken English in Zimbabwe and is collaborating with scholars and students at the University of Zimbabwe on this strand of the larger Zimbabwe project.

Professor Russell Hand
r.hand@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

Research interests

Radioactive waste vitrification
Research is focussed on glass composition development for the immobilisation of "difficult" anionic species and legacy wastes into vitreous wasteforms. His group is currently working on developing novel glasses for the vitrification of Mo containing wastes and understanding the crystallisation of Mo containing phases in current waste glass compositions.

Durability of nuclear waste glasses
Research is focussed on understanding the effects of high pH environments on the durability of nuclear waste glasses using laboratory based durability test methods. In addition he is responsible for the field based long term glass burial site at Ballidon (a limestone environment), an experiment now in its 44th year, and which involves collaboration with Dr Strachan from Pacific North-West National Laboratory, USA.

Mechanical properties of glasses
Research is focussed on examining the effects of composition on the mechanical properties of silicate glasses. His group has previously demonstrated the important role of MgO in these glasses and we are currently investigating this further. We have also studied the mechanical properties of nuclear borosilicate glasses. His group is also focussing on assessing the changes in near surface mechanical properties of glasses due to hydration by nanoindentation and at the effects of high temperature mechanical contact on surface damage and thus the practical strength of bulk glass.

Sensing using reinforcing fibres in polymer matrix composites
Research is focussed on developing novel glasses for reinforcing fibres that can be used for both chemical and damage sensing in polymer matrix composites. This research is being undertaken in collaboration with CSIC.

Dr Nigel Harwood
n.harwood@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of English Language and Linguistics

Research Interests

I am interested in hearing from PhD applicants who wish to conduct qualitative or predominantly qualitative projects relating to academic writing, academic literacies, ESP/EAP, or language teaching materials/textbooks.

I am a qualitative researcher, and the primary research methods I use in my work are interviews and textual analysis. My doctoral thesis is a corpus-based study of how the personal pronouns I and WE are used in academic writing across four disciplines (Business, Economics, Computing, and Physics) by ‘experts’ writing journal articles and postgraduate students writing dissertations. I have published papers on taking a lexical approach to ELT and on taking a corpus-based critical pragmatic approach to English for academic purposes. More recent work includes research on citation in academic writing, on proofreaders’ beliefs and practices when working on student texts, and on supervisors’ and supervisees’ experiences of master’s dissertation supervision. I have published my findings in outlets such as Applied Linguistics, Written Communication, Text & Talk, English for Specific Purposes, Journal of Pragmatics, Studies in Higher Education, Journal of the American Society for Information Science & Technology, and Journal of Business & Technical Communication.

In general, my research interests lie in the following areas:

  • Analysis of academic writing—analysing the text and interviewing writers about their texts
  • Citation analysis
  • Academic literacies in higher education
  • Academic socialisation in higher education
  • English for specific and academic purposes
  • Development and use of and language teaching materials and textbooks
  • Critical pedagogy
  • English language teaching and learning


Professor Neil Hyatt
n.c.hyatt@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

Research interests

Radioactive waste management and disposal.
Our focus is on developing strategy, materials, processes and policy to support the safe, timely and efficient clean up of the UK radioactive waste legacy. A key aspect of our research is the design, manufacture and performance assessment of glass and ceramic materials for the immobilisation of plutonium residues, legacy intermediate level wastes, and high level wastes from reprocessing operations. We work closely with industrial organisations, including Sellafield Ltd., the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and National Nuclear Laboratory to address real world challenges of radioactive waste management. Our work has supported development of thermal treatment strategy by Sellafield Ltd. and Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and the acceptance of vitrified intermediate level wastes wastes in conceptual designs for the UK Geological Disposal Facility.

Advanced nuclear materials.
Research is focused on the development of new materials and processes for application in future nuclear fission and fusion fuel cycles. We are currently developing novel processing methods for advanced cermet fuels with application in naval reactor concepts, ceramic clad materials for accident tolerant nuclear fuels, and the application of molten salts technology to reprocessing of nuclear fuels. We are also working on new waste management strategies for future fuel cycles, to reduce the ultimate geological disposal footprint.

Structure-property relations in mixed metal oxides.
Research is focused on the study of structure-property relationships in perovskite related oxides showing a range of useful physical properties such as high temperature superconductivity, colossal magnetoresistance and anisotropic magnetic exchange. Recent work has investigated structure-property relationships in layered perovskite ferroelectrric oxides and oxide-fluorides.

Dr Lucy Jackson
lucy.jackson@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield Methods Institute

Lucy’s research background is in critical social geographies though her research is applicable broadly across the social sciences including health, criminology, politics, sociology and anthropology. Lucy’s research aims to re-address questions of ‘the social’, not just in terms of social justice, but in terms of socio-spatial politics and the performative politics of everyday life within different societies. Lucy works with theories around everyday practice such as De-certeau and Lebevre.

Lucy’s research interests are in the field of feminist geopolitics and the critical geography of difference (as lived, experienced, visualised, and emotionalised through practice, performance and engagement), inclusion and exclusion, the body and the self, and identity (as negotiated, relational, complex and multiple). She is committed to research in the justice, rights and lived experience of othered groups through activist and community development projects and organisations.

Lucy’s research interests also focus upon a politics of everyday practice, an understanding of everyday publics, policies and attitudes and how this leads to the formation of different communities as well as in developing new and engaging qualitative methodological approaches. Lucy's research interest also lies in the practice and performance of everyday, banal, politics and political acts. She is predominantly recognised for her engagement with feminist countertopographical research and with innovative qualitative methods which connects emotions, experience and practice in and through scales to focus on a politics of the everyday.

For example, Lucy’s previous research has focused upon conflicting and competing rights in the city, studying the example of faith and secular groups, as well as pro-life and pro-choice protesters in the UK, working with migrant communities in the UK and South Asia to understand their everyday practices of, and commitment to, citizenship as both formal and informal category, and more recently work in East Africa around the potential for critical citizen engagement.

Dr Naoko Komori
N.Komori@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

Naoko’s major interest is to enhance understanding of the processes of globalization in the field of accountancy, with specific reference to Japan. She applied multiple approaches to explore how international audit firms have integrated with Japan’s indigenous culture, and how this process is impacting on the way professional identities are constructed.

The relationship between women and accounting:

She has explored how the relationship between women and accounting has developed in the Japanese historical and social context by conducting thorough ethnographic research (including interviews with 66 women accounting professionals).

She has linked this to the growing significance of auditing in Japan under the influence of globalization. Her paper was awarded a prestigious “High Commendation” in the Mary Parker Follett Award for 2009.

She has been invited by the Japan Institute of Certified Public Accountants (JICPA) to contribute a chapter to a book being published to raise the profile of Japanese women accounting professionals. The book is a collection of the life stories of 20 women CPAs, drawn from a variety of professional backgrounds.

The impact of the investment culture on household accounting:

She is interested the role of Japanese household accounting practices and how the increasing impact of the investment culture is changing its nature under the influence of globalization.

She was invited to deliver one of her papers as part of the Japan Foundation Fellows Lecture Series, in London (“Rethinking Mrs Watanabe: changes and constraints in the relationship between Japanese women and accounting/finance under the influence of globalization”).

The influence of culture on the auditing practice:

She is now embarking on a range of new research projects, which together take a broader look at the arena of auditing and corporate governance. These include: the historical development of audit firms; a case study of the auditor-client relationship in Toyota Corp; and the nature of corporate governance in different social and cultural contexts. She is also interested in developing research methods and practice for cross-cultural accounting research, with particular reference to oral history method and autoethnography.

Dr Natalia Martsinovich

Personal Webpage

Department of Chemistry

Research Interests

My research is focussed on studying the properties of surface-adsorbate interfaces and processes taking place at these interfaces. Important applications include photovoltaics and photocatalysis. I use a range of theoretical methods, mainly density-functional theory, and also charge transfer theory and molecular mechanics.

Photovoltaics
Photovoltaics uses solar cells to convert solar energy into electricity. Several types of solar cells have been developed; the current market leaders – silicon solar cells – are efficient but expensive. Solar cells based on organic molecules (such as organic and dye-sensitised solar cells (DSSC)) and recently developed perovskite solar cells, are cheap and are currently a subject of active research. The efficiencies of these solar cells are controlled by light absorption properties and rates of charge transfer within the solar cell. I recently developed a model for calculating the rates of charge transfer between semiconductors and adsorbed dyes, to identify semiconductor-dye interfaces which lead to efficient DSSC.

Photocatalysis
Photocatalysis is a process which converts the energy of the Sun into the energy of chemicals. One of the most important photocatalytic processes is the splitting of water into molecular oxygen and hydrogen. This process is particularly interesting because hydrogen is a promising fuel and an environmentally friendly "clean" alternative to petrol. I study semiconductor metal oxides (such as TiO2) and carbon nitrides to investigate light absorption and charge separation in photocatalysts - essential processes for photocatalytic oxidation and reduction reactions.

Molecular self-assembly
Another area of interest is molecular self-assembly – the process whereby molecules assemble into ordered patterns, thanks to specific interactions between these molecules. These ordered structures have the potential to be used as circuits in molecular electronics. I have modelled the structures and dynamics of two-dimensional assemblies of organic molecules (e.g. carboxylic acids) on graphite, in collaboration with the experimental group of M. Lackinger in Munich.

Dr Cheryl Miller
c.a.miller@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

My research interests are varied, interdisciplinary and lie within the field of materials for biomedical and dental applications. My research focuses on the design, fabrication and characterisation of novel glasses, ceramics and composites for dental and medical applications. Much of this research is in collaboration with Engineering Materials (UoS), Imperial College London, Chubu University, Japan and Sao Paulo University, Brazil. My research has also progressed to the production of custom prostheses using novel production methods and advanced manufacturing techniques such as additive manufacture, Hot-Isostatic-Pressing, Spark-Laser-Sintering, freeze-casting, laser machining and electro-spinning. In addition, due to my involvement in the MMedSci in Dental Implantology, I also supervise projects in the area of dental implantology.

My research is progressing more towards knowledge and technology transfer, hence my industrial collaborations are widening and increasing, presently these include Ceramisys Ltd (a SME manufacturing and distributing bone augmentation materials); Fluidinova (a SME manufacturer of nanoceramics); Primequal (a SME specialising in development of medical devices); neotherix (a regenerative medicine SME specialising in novel bioresorbable scaffolds); CERAM (materials testing, analysis and consultancy); JRI (a manufacturer of orthopaedic implants and surgical instrumentation); Nobel Biocare (a world leader in innovative restorative and aesthetic dental solutions); Dentsply (a global leading manufacturer and distributer of high quality dental product) and GlaxoSmithKline (one of the world's leading research-based pharmaceutical and healthcare companies).

Dr Gwendolen Reilly
g.reilly@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

Research interests

Our research has applications in orthopaedic and dental medicine, where clinicians are looking for improved methods to repair skeletal tissues; bone, tendon and cartilage.

Bone tissue engineering.
The aim of bone tissue engineering is to create bone matrix in the laboratory for clinical implantation and as an experimental tool. Our research in this area focuses on two main themes; the effects of mechanical stimulation on differentiation and matrix formation by bone cells and the interactions between precursor bone cells and their biomaterial substrate. Mechanical stimuli examined include dynamic compression, stretch and fluid flow induced shear stresses using a range of bioreactors (including a collaboration with Bose ElectroForce systems group).

Musculoskeletal cell mechanobiology.
We are interested in how skeletal cells respond to extrinsic and intrinsic stimuli by organizing the proteins and mineral they secrete in a way which enhances the strength of the matrix. This information can then be used to manipulate tissue engineered structures in order to induce structurally sound matrix formation. We specifically focus on mechanosensation mechanisms found on the cell membrane; the cell’s proteoglycan (sugar-based) coat and a small organelle that protrudes from the cell membrane – the primary cilia.

Orthopaedic biomaterials.
We investigate the interactions between musculoskeletal cells and orthopaedic and dental materials that are implanted into bone. Materials investigated include porous metals, polymer scaffolds and peptide coated surfaces (in collaboration with Orla Protein Technologies). This research encompasses study of the mechanical properties of biomaterial scaffolds, cell-material interactions, cell mechanics and cell signalling.

Professor Anthony Ryan
a.ryan@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemistry

Research interests

The common theme in my research is phase transitions in polymers. Most recently we have used the knowledge of the thermodynamics and kinetics of phase behaviour in polymer blends and block copolymers to develop new processing methods based on self-assembly. This has led to the development of the new field of Soft Nanotechnology where synthetic and natural macromolecules are harnessed in a way that makes use of their intrinsic flexibility and susceptibility to Brownian motion to generate work from changes on molecular conformation. Developments in polymers responsive to their environment have lead to research into molecular machines, specifically the fabrication of molecular valves and motors.

We do polymer synthesis in order to have well defined systems to study. The dynamics of phase behaviour are studied by calorimetry, spectroscopy, rheology, microscopy and light, X-ray or neutron scattering. A full suite of microstructural analysis (atomic force, optical and electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and mechanical testing) is used to confirm the dynamic experiments and where appropriate computer modelling is also used.

My main contribution to the field has been the development and application of the techniques of time-resolved structural tools to polymers. This work was the subject of prizes in 1990 by the Plastics and Rubber Institute, in 1992, 1999 and 2003 from the Royal Society of Chemistry and in 1999 from the Polymer Processing Society.

I have been active in promulgating the public understanding of science since my graduate student days. This culminated in my appointment as the Royal Institution Christmas Lecturer for 2002 where my theme was the science and technology of everyday things. The lectures were seen on Channel 4 by 4.5 million viewers and have also been broadcast in Europe, Japan and Korea. I was also the 1st EPSRC Senior Media Fellow to allow me to combine world-class research and popular understanding of the impact of science and technology on society. I was awarded an OBE in 2005 for "services to science".

Dr Phil Shackley
p.shackley@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Research interests
  • Developing and applying the contingent valuation methodology, in particular the technique of willingness to pay. Applications include: estimating the social value of a quality adjusted life year (QALY); using willingness to pay values to aid priority setting in publicly-financed health care systems; investigating how willingness to pay can and should be used alongside randomised trials; the use of willingness to pay to evaluate the benefits of public health interventions such as the fluoridation of drinking water supplies and the supplementation of flour with folic acid; evaluating minimally invasive surgery; assessing patient preferences for diagnostic radiology; and assessing preferences for an expanded newborn screening programme.
  • The identification, measurement and valuation of (dis)benefits that are not captured in the QALY approach. Applications include: assessing the value of patient health cards; eliciting patient preferences for out-of-hours primary care services; establishing and quantifying the preferences of mental health service users for day hospital care; eliciting patient preferences for the organisation of vascular services; and assessing preferences for access to a general practitioner.
  • The application of economic evaluation techniques to assess the efficiency of health care programmes and interventions. Applications include: screening in primary care; antenatal screening; management of lower respiratory tract infection in general practice; computerised cognitive behavioural therapy for anxiety and depression; methods for assessing patients with intermittent claudication; drug treatments for epilepsy; stroke incidence and prevention in Tanzania; venous leg ulcers; and treating upper limb spasticity due to stroke with botulinum toxin.
Dr Rachel Tomlinson
r.a.tomlinson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

As part of the Experimental Mechanics Laboratory, current research projects are in the development and use of optical instruments to measure strain in a wide range of applications, such as particulate reinforced materials, automotive glass, and aircraft components.

Digital Image Correlation techniques are being used to study damage in particulate reinforced materials. A range of particulate toughened polymers are being studied: to investigate experimentally the deformation mechanisms around the particles; to identify and characterise the potential failure mechanisms through experiment; and to explore how these mechanisms can be modelled mathematically. The work is sponsored by Cytec Engineered Materials Ltd, who are global providers of technologically advanced composite materials for high performance aerospace and automotive applications.

Within safety critical industries, such as in aircraft manufacture, numerical analyses need to be verified by experiment. However both the cost of development tests and the time taken to perform them are considerably greater than the cost and time required to conduct Finite Element Analyses (FEA). Airbus are sponsoring research into the use of Additive Layer Manufacturing (ALM) techniques to accurately produce scaled structural models for the aerospace industry with the aim of improving efficiency of design.

Asymmetric stress profiles through glass may be measured using magnetophotoelasticity. Pilkington plc are sponsoring research into developing a full-field magnetopolariscope system, which will enable more effective measurement of residual stress in glass. Non-destructive methods to measure stresses in three-dimensional photoelastic models of engineering components are being investigated. A joint research project with The University of Manchester is developing a new instrument using tomographic techniques, which will allow experimental verification of design prototypes to be performed quickly and efficiently.

Thermoelastic stress analysis techniques are being used in a number of different areas including exploring why a crack grows in the direction that it does, and investigating damage in polymers and elastomers used in the oilfield industry.

Other areas of interest are with birefringent fluids with applications in a wide variety of practical engineering problems, e.g. flow through micro-channels; unsteady flows; biological flows; and classic fluid dynamics problems, and using photoelasticity in medical and dental applications.

Dr Alison Twelvetrees
a.twelvetrees@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Neuroscience

Neurons form complex extended cellular structures; for example motor neurons have cell bodies in the spinal cord whilst extending axons down to the muscles of the hands and feet. Dendritic trees are also highly branched and spatially specialised structures. These morphological specialisations of neurons are essential to their function, but also hugely challenging as the majority of newly synthesised protein is made in the cell body and then actively transported to its site of use, up to 1 meter away. In addition, retrograde transport back to the cell body is required to remove ageing proteins and organelles from the distal neurites for degradation, as well as to relay neurotrophic survival signals back to the cell body.

Almost all the long distance transport events in neurons fall under the label of ‘microtubule mediated transport’. This label masks a complex set of co-dependent intracellular trafficking events of a huge array of cargos critical for maintaining neuronal homeostasis. There is now a large body of evidence demonstrating deficits in transport in multiple unrelated adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, as well as motor neuron diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs). In addition, deficits in transport are frequently found as an early event in disease models.

Our research is focused on how the microtubule cytoskeleton and its motor proteins, kinesin and dynein, build and maintain neurons. We aim to understand the molecular mechanisms of this process and create new avenues for translational research into neurodegnerative conditions.

Current research themes include:

  • Discovering neuron specific functions of motor proteins, defined by the inclusion of neuron specific motor protein subunits.
  • Understanding the molecular level difference between fast and slow axonal transport by using biophysical approaches to dissect kinesin activation.
  • Establishing whether augmenting kinesin activation has therapeutic potential in neurodegenerative conditions.
  • Developing new tools and strategies to study and analyse axonal transport in real time.
We use the methods of biochemistry, biophysics, neuronal cell biology and translational neuroscience to apporach our research questions in a truely multidisciplinary fashion.


Dr Stefania Vicari
s.vicari@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Stefania's overarching research interest is in dynamics of civic engagement on digital platforms of communication. Her approach to online data is based on a variety of textual analysis techniques - with an increasing focus on text analytics - informed by social network and framing theories. Stefania specifically focuses on:

  • Digital activism: Stefania's early research focused on how digital media ease upward and downward scale shifts (i.e., from local to transnational and vice versa) in framing grievances. Work in this camp investigated the Global Justice Movement and the World Social Forum. She is also particularly interested in social media use with relevance to public sphere processes in the context of protest events, issue publics, everyday talk. Her work in this field has specifically focused on interactional and deliberative processes in the Cuban blogosphere and on meaning construction on Twitter streams relevant to anti-austerity protests in Italy.
  • Digital health. Stefania is interested in the role of digital media in health democratizing processes, especially in processes of self-care, patient advocacy, health public debate, and health activism. Her main interest is in if, how and to what extent digital media may enhance bottom-up, patient-centred health practices. Stefania's work in this area is currently looking at online affordances for rare disease patient organisations in advocacy and activist dynamics and rare disease discourse practices on Facebook and Twitter.


Stefania has supervised PhD projects looking at different aspects of digital media use, among which, digital literacy, digital activism and online political participation. She is particularly interested in supervising students investigating digital activism, social media and health and/or who wish to apply digital methods approaches.

Dr Kate Weiner
k.weiner@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

I work at the intersection of medical sociology and science and technology studies. My doctoral research looked at lay and professional constructions of familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH), a treatable hereditary condition associated with heart disease. My analysis focussed on the themes of geneticisation, genetic responsibility and biosociality, three prominent concepts in discussions of the social implications of genetic knowledge. Subsequent research projects looked at more mundane health technologies for cholesterol management, including cholesterol-lowering foods containing plant sterols and prescription and over-the-counter statins. Current research is expanding this work on consumer health technologies, looking at self-monitoring technologies such as blood pressure monitors and weighing scales/BMI monitors. All of these studies consider professional expectations as well as people’s accounts of why and how they adopt and use, or don't use, particular products or technologies. They consider the way responsibilities for health are distributed, the practices involved and the implications for forms of expertise in relation to health care. The work critically engages with notions of 'self-care' and 'health behaviours', proposing alternative lenses such as care infrastructures and practice theory approaches. I have an ongoing interest in developments in the biomedical sciences. Recent work has looked at the routine practices of racialised prescribing.

 Research interests:

  • everyday health practices
  • mundane health technologies
  • self-monitoring, self-tracking, self-care
  • social implications of biomedical developments eg genomics, epigenetics
  • social categories in the clinic
  • qualitative research methods
Dr Sara Whiteley
sara.whiteley@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of English Language and Linguistics

Research interests

My research interests lie at the interface between language and literature, in the disciplines of stylistics, cognitive poetics and discourse analysis. My research examines issues of textual effect and interpretation in relation to contemporary prose and poetry. I am particularly interested in studying the experience of reading and researching reader responses to literary texts using empirical methods

  • Emotional responses to literature: Some of my recent research examined the emotional effects of three novels by the author Kazuo Ishiguro, drawing on reader responses from face-to-face and online reading group discussions and using the cognitive-linguistic framework Text World Theory. My article ‘Text World Theory, Real Readers and Emotional Responses to The Remains of the Day’ won the 2012 Poetics and Linguistics Association prize.
  • Creative Writing in the Community project: In 2010 I collaborated with colleagues at the University of Sheffield on the year-long ‘Creative Writing in the Community’ project, examining the impact of literary reading and writing on the local community. My strand of the project involved the comparative analysis of discussions held by groups of readers both within and outside of University about the same poetic texts. The project culminated in a Forum event which brought members of the public, academics and the poet Simon Armitage together to discuss notions of literary interpretation and the relationships between authors and readers.
  • 'Book of the Festival’ project: In 2013 I collaborated with staff at Off the Shelf literary festival, Sheffield Libraries and Dr David Peplow from Sheffield Hallam University on the ‘Book of the Festival’ project. This project saw academic research into reader responses running alongside public events at the literary festival. The novel selected as ‘Book of the Festival 2013’ was The Universe versus Alex Woods by Sheffield-based author Gavin Extence. A number of local reading groups were recorded discussing the novel over the summer of 2013, and the text formed the focus of a series of events involving the author, readers, University researchers and the wider public. My strand of the project involved comparative analysis of the different reading group discussions, and continuing analysis of the relationship between the language of the novel and the discourse of readers.


Dr Simon Willerton
S.Willerton@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

Dr. Willerton is interested in various ideas in low-dimensional topology coming from quantum physics, and in their relationship to geometry and algebraic topology. 

In particular, methods from quantum field theory give rise to new invariants of knots and three-manifolds -- these are the so-called quantum and Vassiliev (or finite-type) invariants. A large part of the motivation for Dr. Willerton's work is to understand these invariants from a topological or geometric point of view. For instance, the Kontsevich integral is a construction which takes a knot and gives back a sort of Feynman diagram expansion: this embodies a rich algebraic structure that is reminiscent of certain objects from algebraic topology, but it is not clear at the moment how to relate these. 

Well-studied examples of quantum invariants arise when one fixes a Lie group. Motivated in part by trying to understand the Kontsevich integral, Dr. Willerton has considered (with collaborators in San Diego and Oxford) the less well-studied invariants which arise when one fixes a hyper-Kahler manifold. This work has revealed unexpected algebraic structures in the derived category of coherent sheaves on a complex manifold. 

The theory of gerbes is a related interest of Dr. Willerton. Gerbes can be thought of as the next step beyond line bundles. Ideas from this area feed into K-theory, string theory and the quantum invariants mentioned above. 

In recent times Dr Willerton has been interested in the connections between metric spaces and category theory. This has lead in particular to him studying measures of biodiversity.

Dr Chantal Cantarelli
c.c.cantarelli@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research

Chantal’s research interests are in improving the success of megaprojects using theories in front-end planning, decision-making, risk management, and organisational behaviour. Her research focuses particularly on the influence of project ownership and financing on project performance. Furthermore, Chantal’s research interests are in studying the phenomenon of escalation of commitment in the decision-making of projects as an explanation for project failure. Other research interests include public-private partnerships, public sector efficiency and effectiveness.

Chantal is a member of the Logistics and Supply Chain Management (LSCM) Research Centre and the Advanced Resource Efficiency Centre (AREC) at the University of Sheffield.

PhD Supervision

 

Chantal is interested in supervising doctoral students in the field of operations management and project management. She is keen to supervise students who have an interest in quantitative or qualitative methods in research related to major programmes.

 

 

Publications

Cantarelli, C., Chorus, C.G. and Cunningham, S.W. (2013). Explaining cost overruns of large-scale transportation infrastructure projects using a signaling game. Transport Science, 9(3) 239-258.

Cantarelli, C., Flyvbjerg, B. and Buhl, S.L. (2012). Geographical variation in project cost performance. The Netherlands versus worldwide. Journal of Transport Geography, 24 324-331.

Cantarelli, C., Molin, E.J.E., van Wee, B. and Flyvbjerg, B. (2012). Characteristics of cost overruns for Dutch transport infrastructure projects and the importance of the decision to build and project phases. Transport Policy, 22 49-56.

Cantarelli, C., van Wee, B., Molin, E.J.E. and Flyvbjerg, B. (2012). Different cost performance: different determinants? The case of cost overruns in Dutch transport infrastructure projects. Transport Policy, 22 88-95.

Cantarelli, C., Flyvbjerg, B., van Wee, B. and Molin. E.J.E. (2010). Lock-in and its influence on the project performance of large-scale transportation infrastructure projects: investigating the way in which lock-in can emerge and affect cost overruns. Environment and Planning B: Planning & Design, 37(5) 792-807.

Chantal C. Cantarelli, Bent Flyvbjerg, Eric J.E. Molin and Bert van Wee (2010). Cost overruns in large-scale transportation infrastructure projects: explanations and their theoretical embeddedness. European Journal of Transport and Infrastructure Research, 10(1) 5-18.

Dr Anthony Haynes
a.haynes@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemistry

Research Interests

The Haynes group investigates mechanistic aspects of homogeneous transition metal catalysed reactions, particularly industrially important processes such as methanol carbonylation and alkene hydroformylation. Synthetic, spectroscopic, kinetic and computational methods are used to study the structure and reactivity of organometallic complexes and their roles in catalysis.

Mechanisms of rhodium and iridium catalysed methanol carbonylation

The catalytic carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid is one of the most significant industrial applications of homogeneous transition metal catalysis. We have a long-standing research collaboration with BP Chemicals, who operate methanol carbonylation plants worldwide, and introduced a new process(Cativa TM) in 1995 that uses a promoted iridium/iodide catalyst. Highlights of our mechanistic studies include the first spectroscopic detection of a highly reactive Rh-methyl intermediate in the rhodium-catalysed process[1] and elucidation of the role of promoters in the iridium-based system.[2] We recently showed that the rate of migratory CO insertion in [Ir(CO)2I3Me]- is dramatically increased by isomerisation to place a CO ligand trans to methyl.[3]

Ligand effects on oxidative addition and migratory CO insertion
 
We are interested in how the rates of key steps in catalytic cycles can be influenced by the electronic and steric properties of "spectator" ligands, e.g. phosphines, imines and N-heterocyclic carbenes. Strongly donating ligands tend to promote oxidative addition and retard migratory CO insertion, whereas sterically bulky ligands tend to have the opposite effects on these steps.[4] In a recent study of the mechanism of rhodium/xantphos-catalysed methanol carbonylation it was found that the key intermediates contained xantphos coordinated as a tridentate "pincer" ligand and the nucleophilicity of the metal centre is enhanced by a Rh---O interaction.[5]

Computational studies
Our experimental studies are complimented by theoretical calculations, carried out in collaboration with Dr. Anthony Meijer in this department. We are interested in modelling trends in organometallic reactivity and spectroscopic properties, e.g. vibrational spectra of metal carbonyl complexes.

Facilities
The department is well-equipped with modern instrumentation for NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, mass-spectrometry and chromatography. In addition, the group has dedicated FTIR instruments for kinetic measurements, including high pressure and stopped-flow IR cells.

References
1. (a) JACS, 1991, 113, 8567; (b) JACS, 1993, 115, 4093.
2. JACS, 2004, 126, 2847.
3. Inorg. Chem., 2009, 48, 28
4. (a) JACS, 2002, 124, 13597; (b) Organometallics, 2003, 22, 1047; (c) Organometallics, 2003, 22, 4451.
5. Organometallics, 2011, 30, 6166.

Dr Michael Hippler
m.hippler@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemistry

Research Interests

The aim of my research is the development of new methods and applications of ultra-sensitive, high-resolution laser spectroscopy to study the structure and dynamics of molecules and clusters. The understanding of intramolecular primary processes in polyatomic molecules at the fully quantum dynamical level remains among the most challenging research questions in physics and chemistry, with applications also in biology and environmental sciences. High-resolution spectroscopy is among the most powerful tools in advancing such research and it is crucial in this context to develop new and ever more powerful spectroscopic experiments.

In my work in Zürich, I successfully developed new experimental techniques for the infrared laser spectroscopy of gas-phase molecules. These techniques have been applied to the study of intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution, vibrational mode-specific tunnelling of hydrogen-bonded clusters and stereomutation dynamics. In one class of experiments, pulsed IR laser systems are used to excite vibrational transitions and a second, subsequent UV laser pulse to ionise the excited molecules. Ionisation detection of IR excitation has been coupled with a mass spectrometer thus adding a second dimension to optical spectroscopy. In another class of experiments, the extreme sensitivity of cavity-ring-down (CRD) spectroscopy (effective absorption path lengths of several km) is combined with the very high resolution of continuous wave (cw) diode lasers (100 kHz). This technique has been applied to measure accurately the transition strengths and weak overtone transitions of molecules (nitrous oxide, methane) and of hydrogen-bonded clusters (HF dimer).

So far in Sheffield, I have studied molecular association by FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and high-level quantum-chemical calculations. For this purpose, I set up a very sensitive stimulated Raman experiment with photoacoustic detection ('PARS'). Among the intermolecular forces, the hydrogen-bond X-H...Y is particularly relevant. A hydrogen bond usually exhibits a characteristic 'red'-shift (shift to lower wavenumbers) of the X-H stretching vibration, but more unconventional 'blue'-shifting hydrogen bonds also occur and have become a hot topic of current research. In Sheffield, I have recently studied some unusual, "blue-shifting" hydrogen bonds (e.g., CHCl3...SO2 in the gas phase and open HCOOH structures in liquid formic acid) by theory and experiment.