Research Supervisor Details

This page provides additional information about our research supervisors. You can either browser supervisors by department or search for them by keyword. Most supervisors also have a personal webpage where you can find out more about them.

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Professor Jeremy Dawson
J.F.Dawson@Sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

Jeremy's research falls broadly into three areas, with plenty of crossover between them – management of health care organisations, team working, and statistics. Recent projects in health care include a study of the effects of NHS staff engagement and experience on patient outcomes; various studies of team working in health care, particularly in mental health services; an examination of the effects of organisational restructuring in the NHS; and a project looking at the diversity of hospital staff and their representativeness of the local community. In 2014 he begins an NIHR-funded study evaluating Schwartz Center Rounds® in the NHS.

As well as teams in health care, he has a more general interest in team diversity, and in particular how it should be measured. As a statistician he has also undertaken a wide range of methodological research, particularly regarding interpretation of interaction effects, measurement of diversity, analysis of incomplete team data, and the effects of aggregation on relationships. He has published over 30 papers in refereed academic journals in the fields of psychology, management, health care and research methods, as well as numerous project reports and articles in practitioner publications. He is an editorial board member of five journals, and an Associate Editor of the Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology.

Dr Sarah Mitchell
s.j.mitchell@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism
  • Palliative and end-of-life care in primary care
  • Identification and management of supportive and palliative care needs in the community
  • Palliative care for children and young people 
  • Medical ethics
  • Cancer, complexity and multi-morbidity 
  • Improving cancer care in primary care 
  • Health service design and the translation of policy into practice
Professor Alicia O'Cathain
a.ocathain@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

Mixed methods, evaluation of new health services, patient views of health care, urgent care.

Dr Andrew Lee
andrew.lee@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My main research interests are in the field of health protection-related topics such as disaster response and emergency planning, and the control of communicable diseases/infectious diseases. I am also interested in topics in international health, primary care as well as health service management.  Examples of my previous research and consultancy activities include

  • evidence review of the public health benefits of urban greenspace
  • study of the drivers of smoking in young people in Pakistan
  • study on beneficiary perspectives of humanitarian aid in Sri Lanka after the Asian Tsunami disaster
  • NIHR-funded study scoping the evidence base for emergency planning in health in the UK
  • NIHR-funded study examining the international evidence base for demand management interventions of referrals from primary to secondary care
  • evaluation of a telehealth intervention for patients with long term conditions 
  • developing evidence-based disaster management practice in the UK and Nepal,
  • investigating barriers to testing and treatment of Hepatitis B in the migrant Chinese ethnic population in the UK,
  • evaluation of the WHO in-country presence,
  • evidence review of interventions for malnutrition in emergencies,
  • studying the determinants of testing for latent TB infection in South Asians in the UK.

My current ongoing research projects (as of February 2017) are:  

  • developing a series of health research projects on slum health in Nepal,
  • evidence review of public health needs following earthquakes.
Dr Steven Ariss
S.Ariss@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

Methods:


• Realist (and other ‘theory led’) Evaluations of Programmes and Complex Interventions 
• Conversion Analysis & Ethnomethodology
• Mixed and Qualitative Research Methods

Topics of Interest:

• Health Service Organisation and Delivery
• Interdisciplinary Team-Working
• Organisational change management
• Implementation and knowledge transfer
• Use of technology in healthcare (for service development and evaluation)
• Health Care Interactions and Relationships
• Self-Management of Chronic and Long-Term Conditions
• Older People's Community Health Services

Dr Janet Harris
janet.harris@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Research interests
  • community-based participatory approaches to improving health care services, with a particular focus on health inequalities.
  • social constructions of health and illness in the context of access to health care and employment policy
  • effectiveness of different approaches to teaching and learning in terms of promoting work-based skills and evidence based practice
  • mixed methods evaluation research
  • realist evaluation and realist synthesis
Dr Hannah Jordan
h.c.jordan@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

I am interested in the measurement, impact and understanding of variations in geographical access to health service; in the influence of the built and spatial environment on health behaviours and outcomes, the use of and access to health services; and in barriers to self-care and self-management in older people.

Dr Caroline Mitchell
c.mitchell@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Academic Unit of Medical Education

I am a General Practitioner and Senior Clinical Lecturer;  Deputy Academic Training Programme Director NIHR Sheffield Clinical Academic Training programme; Research training and Capacity Building Lead on the ‘PRIME’ NIHR RCUK Global Health Project 

I have research interests in the overlap of physical and mental health problems and health inequity in access to primary care of high risk, underserved populations. I have methodological expertise in health service qualitative and quantitative study design and analysis including the development and evaluation of complex interventions in primary care; recruiting for clinical studies in high risk deprived and/or socially excluded populations.

Current and recent projects:

EDIT: Early Diagnosis Intervention and Treatment of long-term conditions (respiratory disease, T2 Diabetes Mellitus, Cancer) in high-risk populations.  For example postnatal interventions for women with gestational diabetes, primary care interventions to improve respiratory health of high risk populations , for examples: people who use substances; people living with HIV;  people living with severe mental illness  

Co-investigator,  PhD and Clinical Academic Trainee supervisor on the ‘PRIME’ NIHR Global Health Research Group on PReterm bIrth prevention and manageMEnt (PRIME) https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/news/nr/ptb-grant-reduce-child-death-1.794251. Our LMIC/ UK partnership includes partners in Bangladesh, South Africa and Nigeria. I work as a senior clinical academic within the evidence synthesis, clinical (intervention development, health service delivery)  and social science qualitative research teams  

Postgraduate supervision:

Clinical Academic Trainees; NIHR In practice training fellows; ACF and ACL; Masters; PhD students (multidisciplinary) 

Dr Rachel O'Hara
r.ohara@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Research interests
  • Patient safety
  • Human factors in healthcare
  • Safety culture

I am interested in supervising research students in topics/areas such as Patient Safety, Organisational Culture and Safety Culture in Healthcare.

Dr Emma Knowles
e.l.knowles@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

My research interests are emergency and urgent health care systems, new roles/services within emergency and urgent health care, violence directed towards staff in the Emergency Department.

Dr Diane Burns
d.burns@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School
Research interests
  • Health & Social Care at home and in institutions
  • Care recipent's and care worker's perspectives and knowledge 
  • Financialisation of social care, business models and managment
  • Social innovation in home care provision - a Wellcome Trust funded project 2017-18.
  • Diane's Department of Health and Comic Relief funded project examined organizational cultures in care homes for older people and positive experiences of care. This study was conducted with colleagues at the University of East Anglia, University of Stirling, University of Worcester and Cardiff University.
  • Recently Diane was involved in a two and half year, Department of Health and Comic Relief funded participatory project with care home residents and family carers to examine the organisational dynamics of abuse and respectful care of older people in care homes.

Diane’s research examines organizational arrangements, cultures and change in health and social care systems with two sub themes – organizational failure and institutional abuse in care homes; and social innovation in home care provision.

Diane is interested in supervising qualitative research in health and social care systems and organization; job quality, care workforce and labour arrangments; care quality, abuse and mistreatment in organized care; voice, power and whistle-blowing in the workplace and other organizations; collaborative forms of organizing and partnership. 

Diane is particularly interested in action research, participatory appraoches and co-production, and the development of organizational ethnography using visual methods, poetics and film.

Dr Jennifer Burr
j.a.burr@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Broad area of interest:

  • Sociology of health and illness

Research methods I am able to supervise:

  • Qualitative

Specific areas of interest:

  • Reproductive technology
  • Research ethics
  • Gender and sexuality
Dr Phil Shackley
p.shackley@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Research interests
  • Developing and applying the contingent valuation methodology, in particular the technique of willingness to pay. Applications include: estimating the social value of a quality adjusted life year (QALY); using willingness to pay values to aid priority setting in publicly-financed health care systems; investigating how willingness to pay can and should be used alongside randomised trials; the use of willingness to pay to evaluate the benefits of public health interventions such as the fluoridation of drinking water supplies and the supplementation of flour with folic acid; evaluating minimally invasive surgery; assessing patient preferences for diagnostic radiology; and assessing preferences for an expanded newborn screening programme.
  • The identification, measurement and valuation of (dis)benefits that are not captured in the QALY approach. Applications include: assessing the value of patient health cards; eliciting patient preferences for out-of-hours primary care services; establishing and quantifying the preferences of mental health service users for day hospital care; eliciting patient preferences for the organisation of vascular services; and assessing preferences for access to a general practitioner.
  • The application of economic evaluation techniques to assess the efficiency of health care programmes and interventions. Applications include: screening in primary care; antenatal screening; management of lower respiratory tract infection in general practice; computerised cognitive behavioural therapy for anxiety and depression; methods for assessing patients with intermittent claudication; drug treatments for epilepsy; stroke incidence and prevention in Tanzania; venous leg ulcers; and treating upper limb spasticity due to stroke with botulinum toxin.
Professor Zoe Marshman
z.marshman@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Research interests

My main interest is child-centred dental research to increase understanding of the impact of oral health and dental care on children and young people. My work involves inclusive research with children with the aim of informing policy and clinical practice.

I co-ordinate the Children and Young People Oral Health Research Group, a multidisciplinary team conducting research with children using a range of research methods

Mr Robert Akparibo
R.Akparibo@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Broad area of research interest:

  • International Health planning and management
  • Nutrition
  • Maternal and child health
  • Primary health care

 

Methods I am able to supervise:

  • Qualitative
  • Quantitative
  • Mixed Methods

 

Specific areas of interest:

  • Health literacy
  • Undernutrition
  • Infant and young child nutrition/feeding
  • Micronutrients
  • Evaluation of interventions on any area regarding nutrition
  • Maternal and child health
  • Primary health care in developing countries
  • Health planning and management
Professor Mark Hawley
mark.hawley@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Research interests
  • Assistive Technology
  • Telecare & telehealth
  • Digital Healthcare
Professor Jonathan Nicholl
J.Nicholl@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

My research interests are in Health Services and Public Health research.  My main field of research is the evaluation of emergency and urgent first contact care and services, particularly A and E services, including trauma services and chest pain care; ambulance services including helicopter ambulances; and urgent first contact care services including telephone and out-of-hours services.  I also carry out methodological research related to the design of health service evaluations, and I have a particular interest in the use of routine (e-health) data for HSR.

Dr Clare Gardiner
c.gardiner@sheffield.ac.uk

Nursing and Midwifery

My research interests are in palliative and end of life care, in particular the role of the family caregiver, palliative care in hospitals, care of older people at the end of life, and health economic approaches to palliative care. My methodological expertise lies mainly in qualitative, mixed methods research and evidence synthesis

Professor Elizabeth Goyder
e.goyder@sheffield.ac.uk

School of Health and Related Research

Research topics in the field of developing and implementing evidence-based public health including: health inequalities, access to health care, physical activity interventions, type 2 diabetes and diabetes prevention.

Research methods include mixed methods evaluations of public health and complex interventions and evidence synthesis/ systematic reviews of public health and complex interventions.

Professor Christopher Burton
chris.burton@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Academic Unit of Medical Education
School of Health and Related Research

I am an academic GP with a particular interest in how doctors and patients deal with persistent physical symptoms. My work aims to help doctors explain symptoms constructively. We recognise that symptoms have both peripheral (body) and central (brain) processes and the challenge is to translate developments in science, particularly neuroscience, into explanations which safely make sense of symptoms for patients and lead to better management

I have other interests around diagnosis, testing and reassurance, and healthcare use in relation to both mental and physical ill-health. I use a variety of methods including analysis of large data, development and evaluation of clinical interventions, and technological innovation.

Within the university I lead the Academic Unit of Primary Care, and represent the Academic Unit of Medical Education on faculty research committees. I am a member of the Centre for Urgent Care Research within ScHARR.

Professor James Chilcott
j.b.chilcott@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

* Modelling in public health

* Modelling in cancer and cancer screening

* Methodological modelling interests including:

  • the modelling process and errors in HTA models
  • cognitive mapping for systematic reviews in complex settings
  • structural uncertainty in models
  • Bayesian analysis of joint disease natural history and test characteristics in screening
  • value of information methods
  • probabilistic sensitivity analysis methods
  • meta modelling
  • information gathering processes for models
Dr Sharron Hinchliff
s.hinchliff@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Nursing and Midwifery

My research spans the areas of ageing, gender and sexual/reproductive health, as well as the psychology of health and health care.

I have a strong focus on help-seeking for sexual issues, patient-practioner communication about sexual issues, and social attitudes around ageing, gender, and sex.

Methodologically, my expertise lies in qualitative research, vulnerable groups, and sensitive topics.

Miss Clara Mukuria
c.mukuria@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My research interests are:

  • Development and testing of preference-based health measures in different populations
  • Mapping between condition-specific and generic preference-based measures of health
  • Use of well-being measures in health and social care
Methods I can supervise:
  • Quantitative
  • Mixed methods
Professor Ravindra Maheswaran
r.maheswaran@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My main research interest concerns the application of geographical information systems and science (GIS) to public health research and practice. Research fields within this area include (i) geographical and environmental epidemiology; (ii) geographical variations in health and health care; and (iii) methodology for spatial studies.

Dr Jonathan Dickson
j.m.dickson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Academic Unit of Medical Education
School of Health and Related Research

I am an academic GP.  My special interests are neurology, epilepsy and psychogenic non-epileptic seizures.  Major themes in my research are improving emergency care for people after a seizure and the use of free-association narrative interviews to give new insights into psychogenic non-epileptic seizures. All of my research is about health-service quality improvement, my personal methodological expertise is in quantitative methods but I work in multi-disciplinary research teams using mixed methods to develop and test complex interventions. 

I am very happy to receive informal enquiries.  Feel free to get in touch by email.  

My web profile is avaiable via this link:

https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/medicine/research/aupmc/staff/academicprofiles/jmdickson

 

Professor Angela Tod
a.tod@sheffield.ac.uk

Nursing and Midwifery

My research interests lie mainly in care for adults and older people. My particular research focus is in patient experience studies, especially in areas of public health, health inequalities and health care access. Recent studies have included qualitative research in older patient populations, for example lung cancer, mesothelioma, neutropeanic sepsis and Parkinson's. I have also led a programme of work on fuel poverty, cold homes and health. I have a current interest in patient experience of  health services as well as evaluations of new clinical nursing roles.

Methodologically my expertise lies in qualitative research, in stand-alone and mixed method studies.

I currently jointly lead a 5 year Strategic Research Alliance between the RCN and School of Nursing and Midwifery.

I have a good record of completion for Doctoral student supervision.

Dr Michelle Horspool
m.horspool@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

As well as having an interest and clinical background in substance misuse and mental health (which was the area or work for my PhD), I have experience in designing and delivering complex interventions, as well as the feasibility, design and recruitment to studies within primary care and pharmacy settings. 

Professor Peter Bath
p.a.bath@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Information School

Research interests

My research interests are in Health Informatics and include the following areas:

  • The use of e-Health resources by different consumer groups.
  • Health information needs and information behaviours of patients, their families, carers and the general public.
  • Evaluation of information systems within health care organisations.
  • Applications of artificial intelligence and data mining techniques to analysing health information.
  • Analysing health information in relation to the health and well-being of older people.
  • Sharing of information and experiences by patients, carers and the public on social media, blogs and web-based discussion forums

I am particularly interested in how patients, carers and health professionals seek, obtain and share information and advice in relation to their health and well-being through online digital resources. 

 

Dr Susan Baxter
S.K.Baxter@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Broad area of research interest:

  • Health services delivery
  • Methodologies of systematic reviewing

Research methods I can supervise:

  • Qualitative
  • Qualitative evidence synthesis
  • Systematic reviews
  • Theory-based reviews
  • Logic models

Specific areas of interest:

  • Interprofessional and team working in healthcare
  • Integrated health and social care systems and services
  • Evaluation of services and interventions
  • Patient experiences of healthcare
  • Professional practice
  • Communication systems and patient safety
  • Use of logic models in evidence synthesis
  • Methods to improve the presentation of evidence to stakeholders
  • Allied health professional services
Dr Muhammad Saddiq
M.I.Saddiq@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

Broad research interests:

My research interests are in the areas health policy and systems where I draw on my doctoral research and extensive experience working in this area in Nigeria (has worked for significant periods in all three tiers of government) and West Africa providing technical assistance to government officials at all levels in implementing strategies to strengthen health systems and deliver disease prevention and control programs.  I have worked with national, regional and local governments in design, implementation and evaluation of malaria control and health systems strengthening programs.  I have been involved in complex negotiations with different private sector suppliers of health commodities, addressing cost barriers to access for consumers as well as addressing prescriber behaviour in Nigeria, Ghana and Mali.  I have also worked with an international NGO in deployment of new and effective technologies in addressing high burden, high impact conditions in sub-Saharan Africa.

Methods I can supervise: 

Case studies

Specific Areas of Interest:

Health Systems Management

Dr Sarah Barnes
s.barnes@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My primary research interest is in 'improving the quality of life of older people'. Key research areas arising from this are:-

  • The impact of the physical environment on the quality of life of older people
  • Evaluating the housing needs of older people
  • Assessing the palliative care needs of older people with life-limiting illnesses
  • Improving communication between patients with life-limiting conditions and their health care professionals
  • Improving hospital environments for the end of life care of older people
Dr Sheila Kennedy
S.M.Kennedy@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

My main research interests are in qualitative research and public and patient involvement in research especially relating to the health and social care of people with long term and or life limiting illnesses, development and evaluation of services, support for carers, especially older carers, and the care experiences and outcomes for ‘looked after children’. I am experienced in using qualitative data analysis software programmes.

Dr Ruth Little
ruth.little@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Geography

Her main focus has been increasing understanding of the human factors that influence the management of disease in livestock - analysing how and why livestock farmers make their decisions, and how this affects disease control – and piloting innovative approaches to increase involvement of stakeholders and the wider public in decision-making on Animal Health and Welfare Policy.

Professor John Cullen
john.cullen@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

John's research interests include supply chain management, supply chain accounting, reverse logistics, management control and corporate governance. His research is mainly case study based and it has focused on both small and large organisations in the public and private sectors. He has received research funding from the Department for Transport and CIMA in the areas of supply chain accounting with particular focus on reverse logistics in the UK Retail Sector and from the White Rose Health Innovation Fund to explore the role of accounting in facilitating and stimulating innovation in the NHS.

PhD Supervision:

He is currently continuing his research into supply chain accounting, reverse logistics and the role of accounting and innovation. He is also involved in work on low carbon supply chains. John has delivered presentations to both academic and practitioner conferences across Europe. His work on embedding accounting within the management of reverse logistics is undertaken in collaboration with a colleague from Cranfield University.

Dr Kate Weiner
k.weiner@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

I work at the intersection of medical sociology and science and technology studies. My doctoral research looked at lay and professional constructions of familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH), a treatable hereditary condition associated with heart disease. My analysis focussed on the themes of geneticisation, genetic responsibility and biosociality, three prominent concepts in discussions of the social implications of genetic knowledge. Subsequent research projects looked at more mundane health technologies for cholesterol management, including cholesterol-lowering foods containing plant sterols and prescription and over-the-counter statins. Current research is expanding this work on consumer health technologies, looking at self-monitoring technologies such as blood pressure monitors and weighing scales/BMI monitors. All of these studies consider professional expectations as well as people’s accounts of why and how they adopt and use, or don't use, particular products or technologies. They consider the way responsibilities for health are distributed, the practices involved and the implications for forms of expertise in relation to health care. The work critically engages with notions of 'self-care' and 'health behaviours', proposing alternative lenses such as care infrastructures and practice theory approaches. I have an ongoing interest in developments in the biomedical sciences. Recent work has looked at the routine practices of racialised prescribing.

 Research interests:

  • everyday health practices
  • mundane health technologies
  • self-monitoring, self-tracking, self-care
  • social implications of biomedical developments eg genomics, epigenetics
  • social categories in the clinic
  • qualitative research methods
Professor Susan Mawson
s.mawson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My research focuses on improving the quality of life of people with long term conditions, particularly through exploration of the effectiveness of rehabilitative interventions and the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) to support the self-management of the rehabilitation process. My research work, funded predominantly through the Engineering and Physical Science Research Council, and latterly the NIHR CLAHRC Y&H, has capitalised on new innovations in sensor and digital technologies and involves interdisciplinary work, integrating clinical rehabilitation researchers with engineering, design, mecatronics, informatics and digital media specialists.

Professor Paul Latreille
p.latreille@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

Paul’s research comprises several, sometimes interconnected strands crossing disciplinary boundaries between labour economics, HRM, employment relations and employment law. A member of the Work, Organisation and Employment Relations Research Centre (WOERRC) at the University of Sheffield, his main area of expertise concerns individual workplace conflict and its resolution. A particular focus has been on Employment Tribunals (ETs), including the factors associated with settlement and pre-hearing resolution, the role of representation, outcomes at hearings, and the consequences for claimants of bringing cases. A recent ESRC project with Susan Corby from Greenwich University looked at the role of lay/non-legal members and included a unique survey of judges and lay members at both the ET and its appellate counterpart.

Other areas of research interest include the relationships between disability and work; occupational health and safety; vocational training; self-employment/entrepreneurship; and economic inactivity.

Paul would be willing to consider doing so in relation to any of his research interests or related areas. Students wishing to explore research that draws on a variety of disciplinary perspectives are very welcome, as are those wanting to undertake pedagogical research.

Professor Christopher McDermott
c.j.mcdermott@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Neuroscience
The Medical School

Research interests

The main drive of Prof McDermott’s research programme is developing the evidence base for delivering supportive and symptomatic care for patients living with motor neuron disease. He is also interested in studying mechanisms of neurodegeneration, in order to develop treatments for patients with motor neuron disease and hereditary spastic paraplegia.

Offering PhD opportunities in the following areas:

  • Investigating and delivering optimal respiratory support for patients with MND
  • Establishing an evidence base for nutritional support in MND
  • Designing and evaluating assistive technologies for patients with neuromuscular weakness
  • Developing and evaluating novel service delivery mechanisms for patients with long term neurological conditions
  • Genetic and phenotypic characterisation of motor system disorders
  • Natural history study of motor system disorders
  • Collaborating with pharmaceutical companies in Phase 1-3 studies
  • Improving symptomatic management for patients with MND
  • Epidemiology of motor neuron disease
Professor Suzanne Mason
s.mason@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My research interests relate to the evaluation of complex interventions and systems in emergency care settings. I have extensive experience in multi-centre mixed methods studies which can directly inform the delivery of high quality emergency care to patients.

Dr Andrew Thompson
a.r.thompson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Psychology

Research interests

Clinical Health Psychology. Understanding psychosocial adaptation to trauma and illness (particularly where changes to appearance have occurred).  Specific intetest in psychodermatology and the development of psychosocial interventions for the management of appearance concern/stigma and anxiety.

Miss Stephanie Ejegi-Memeh
s.ejegi-memeh@sheffield.ac.uk

Nursing and Midwifery

My research interests lie mainly in health inequalities and patient experience. I am especially
interested in the areas of health care access and communication between patients and
healthcare professionals. Recent studies have included qualitative research with patients,
family members and staff. This includes studies in the areas of mesothelioma, Type 2
diabetes, ageing, gender and sexual health.
Methodologically, my expertise lies in qualitative research and community engagement.

Dr Andrew Brint
A.Brint@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

Andrew´s research interests include; Infrastructure Asset Management – particularly with regard to electricity distribution networks; The effects of asking and reservation prices in auctions and bargaining – especially for houses, Operations and Supply Chain Management.

Professor Wendy Baird
w.o.baird@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

Research interest focuses on inequalities in health and access to health services for both those with chronic disabling diseases and those who are socially excluded from care.

• Health inequalities 
• Health Services Research and Technology Assessment.
• Public and patient involvement in research

Dr Martina McGuinness
m.mcguinness@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

My research focuses upon two broad, but overlapping areas, namely business risk and small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs). More particularly, these can be broken down into distinct research strands: the influence of corruption upon organisational strategic decision-making in multinational enterprises; organisational preparedness and business continuity practice; strategy practice in SMEs.

I am interested in supervising PhD students in the following areas:

  • organisational risk and resilience
  • business continuity management
  • flood risk management
  • corruption


Dr Chantal Cantarelli
c.c.cantarelli@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research

Chantal’s research interests are in improving the success of megaprojects using theories in front-end planning, decision-making, risk management, and organisational behaviour. Her research focuses particularly on the influence of project ownership and financing on project performance. Furthermore, Chantal’s research interests are in studying the phenomenon of escalation of commitment in the decision-making of projects as an explanation for project failure. Other research interests include public-private partnerships, public sector efficiency and effectiveness.

Chantal is a member of the Logistics and Supply Chain Management (LSCM) Research Centre and the Advanced Resource Efficiency Centre (AREC) at the University of Sheffield.

PhD Supervision

 

Chantal is interested in supervising doctoral students in the field of operations management and project management. She is keen to supervise students who have an interest in quantitative or qualitative methods in research related to major programmes.

 

 

Publications

Cantarelli, C., Chorus, C.G. and Cunningham, S.W. (2013). Explaining cost overruns of large-scale transportation infrastructure projects using a signaling game. Transport Science, 9(3) 239-258.

Cantarelli, C., Flyvbjerg, B. and Buhl, S.L. (2012). Geographical variation in project cost performance. The Netherlands versus worldwide. Journal of Transport Geography, 24 324-331.

Cantarelli, C., Molin, E.J.E., van Wee, B. and Flyvbjerg, B. (2012). Characteristics of cost overruns for Dutch transport infrastructure projects and the importance of the decision to build and project phases. Transport Policy, 22 49-56.

Cantarelli, C., van Wee, B., Molin, E.J.E. and Flyvbjerg, B. (2012). Different cost performance: different determinants? The case of cost overruns in Dutch transport infrastructure projects. Transport Policy, 22 88-95.

Cantarelli, C., Flyvbjerg, B., van Wee, B. and Molin. E.J.E. (2010). Lock-in and its influence on the project performance of large-scale transportation infrastructure projects: investigating the way in which lock-in can emerge and affect cost overruns. Environment and Planning B: Planning & Design, 37(5) 792-807.

Chantal C. Cantarelli, Bent Flyvbjerg, Eric J.E. Molin and Bert van Wee (2010). Cost overruns in large-scale transportation infrastructure projects: explanations and their theoretical embeddedness. European Journal of Transport and Infrastructure Research, 10(1) 5-18.

Dr Rebecca Simpson
r.simpson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
  • Application of statistics in medical research
  • Urgent and Emergency Care
  • Analysis of routinely collected data
  • Asthma Epidemiology
Dr Julie Balen
J.Balen@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Broad areas of interest:

  • Global health
  • Health policy and systems


Research methods I can supervise:

  • Mixed methods
  • Quantitative
  • Qualitative
  • Action research

Specific areas of interest:

  • Leadership and governance of global health and national/local health systems
  • Health systems organization and management
  • Resilience of health systems following complex emergencies/crises/disasters e.g. ebola outbkreak in West Africa; 2015 earthquake in Nepal
  • Integration of vertical and horizontal approaches to delivering health services
  • Neglected (tropical) diseases
  • Interdisciplinary research on health
  • Low-middle income country (LMIC) settings
Professor Scott Weich
s.weich@sheffield.ac.uk

School of Health and Related Research

Scott Weich is Professor of Mental Health in ScHARR.  He is also a practicing NHS Consultant Psychiatrist.

His research interests include public mental health and the study of the distribution, causes and consequences of common mental disorders, as well as mental wellbeing.  He has experience of large-scale observational and secondary research looking at socio-economic, ethnic, gender and spatial variation in mental disorders and their outcomes.

Recent research includes the study of compulsion in mental health services, inclding compulsory admission and the use of Community Treatment Orders.  He is also undertaking research into the way in which patient experience data are collected and used to influence service improvement in NHS mental health services.

Prof Weich has an interest in the evaluation of service change in real-world settings.  He is also interested in the evaluating improvements in the efficiency with which existing services are delivered, and in evaluating the use of technology in mental health care, and in the application of experience-based co-design in mental health settings.

Dr Michael Simpson
m.simpson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

Mike´s current research interests are in the area of Marketing and Operations Management and particularly concentrates on small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) but not entrepreneurship.. Mike has published 3 books, 3 book chapters, over 140 articles and conference papers in both scientific and management areas. He supervises a number of PhD students mainly investigating topics in small and medium sized enterprises but not entrepreneurship. He welcomes PhD applications in any area of small and medium sized enterprise research but not entrepreneurship. He is particularly interested environmental issues in SMEs, issues of achieving a competitive advantage in SMEs, marketing in SMEs, success factors in SMEs and measuring the performance of SMEs.

Professor Pauline Dibben
P.Dibben@Sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

Pauline's research focuses on employment security, with two main sub-themes. The first is employment security and the role of the trade unions in emerging economies. This research programme has considered different dimensions of work and employment and includes the development and analysis of large scale surveys in South Africa, Brazil and Mozambique in addition to in-depth qualitative research. The second is job security for those with disabilities and health conditions. Pauline continues to explore disability and employment, the dynamics of sickness absence and return to work, and the policies and practices surrounding this.

PhD supervision:

Pauline would be interested in supervising students who wish to investigate the role of trade unions or disability and employment.

Dr Andrew Booth
a.booth@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My research interests focus on all methods of systematic review,  evidence synthesis, evidence based practice, and knowledge translation. I am particularly interested in systematic review topics from developing countries, particularly from Sub-Saharan Africa, and in public health topics such as alcohol and HIV/AIDS. I have published with students in topics such as medication adherence, social marketing,  disaster management and evidence based management. My current research students are working in knowledge management in acute hospitals and use of NICE guidance in Social care.  I have been involved in development of a wide range of tools for dissemination, both web based and as online briefings. In 2013 I was one of the first to achieve the University of Sheffield's PhD by Publications with my thesis entitled Acknowledging a Dual Heritage for Qualitative Evidence Synthesis: Harnessing the Qualitative Research and Systematic Review Research Traditions. My most recent interests centre on multiple types of review, including rapid reviews, mapping reviews and scoping reviews.

Professor Stephen Walters
s.j.walters@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Research interests
Dr Mirna Jabbour

Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Dr. Mirna Jabbour's current research interest lies within management accounting, particularly risk management, Enterprise Risk Management (ERM), capital allocation practices, and institutional theory applications into management accounting and risk management. She has one successful PhD completion as a second supervisor in the area of environmental performance. Mirna has supervised a doctoral student in the area of risk management.

Professor Andrea Genovese
a.genovese@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

  • Facility Location Problems: models, methods, applications
  • Applications of Spatial Interaction theory
  • Multi-Criteria Decision Making problems
  • Decision Support Models for Logistics Problems
  • Green logistics and low carbon innovation for Supply Chains
Dr Parveen Ali
parveen.ali@sheffield.ac.uk

Nursing and Midwifery
Health Sciences School

I am a mixed method researcher and equally use qualitative as well as quantitative methods.  I am interested in exploring gender based violence, especially intimate partner violence from the perspective of victims and perpetrators.  I am also interested in exploring health, consanguinity and genetics, and inequalities in health care experiences and health outcomes and how the reparation and training of health professionals such as doctors, nurses and allied health professionals can contribute to tackling such inequalities.

Dr Maxine Johnson
m.johnson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

My research interests include the organisation of health care delivery. In particular, I have been involved in qualitative evaluations of health care from the patient and provider perspective. I have a particular interest in the prevention and self-management of obesity and chronic illness.

More recently I have been involved in synthesising evidence for public health guidance for NICE. In this role I am interested in the development of methods which involve identifying and assessing of a variety of study types in order to provide reviews of evidence that address current public health issues.

Mr Matthew Franklin
matt.franklin@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My current interests are in the use of routinely collected care data for the purpose of costing analysis, economic analysis and decision modelling. I also have an interest in the capability-approach and extra-wefarism and its conceptual and practical application to economic evaluations and decision making, and the conceptual and practical use of outcome measures in general.

I can supervise students interested in the use of large databases of rountinely collected care data for health economic analysis and decision modelling problems. These databases include, but are not limited to:

  • Secondary Uses Service (SUS)
  • Hospital Episode Statistics (HES)
  • Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD)
  • ResearchOne
The aforementioned are some of the more commonly used databases, but I have experience using rountinely collected care data from primary, secondary, intermediate, mental health, ambulance and social care services. 
 
I can also supervise students interested in the conceptual and practical basis of using outcome measures for the purpose of economic evaluation; this includes those students interested in the extra-welfarist approach to welfare economics in relation to the market for health and healthcare.
 
I have more specific interests in research focussed on frail older people, dementia, cognitive impairement and more generalised mental health conditions.

 

Dr Peter Cudd
P.Cudd@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

My research interests include open and closed innovation as topics and across health electronic technology, electronic AT design and evaluation – including intelligent/robotic AT. My particular interests include : simplifying the users experience of sophisticated digital systems – bringing the philosophy of `Use of IT without understanding it´; so called mHealth – use of mobile technologies for any health and social care purposes; the role of patient information within tele-interventions; user centred design methodologies in the health and social care context; patient and public involvement; lay research participants views on research ethics and dementia.

`Use of IT without understanding it´ is practically embodied in an open source Windows™ application called Maavis (Managed access to audio, visual and information services). Currently in collaboration with an external open source developer and the University’s Designer in Residence, an html 5 and Apache licence version is being produced.

My recent short term projects within CATCH have included working on haptic technologies for people with visual impairments, telecare for people with dementia, leisure apps for people with dementia, and telerehabilitation for dysarthria.

Professor Penelope Dick
p.dick@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

Penny´s research interests can be broadly described as critical management. She is interested in the relationships between social structures and individuals and how these create and perpetuate inequalities in employment and careers. She is also interested in how taken-for-granted ideas and practices influence how individuals understand their experiences at work, and whether and how these ideas change and evolve. She is particularly interested in the role of language in these processes, and much of her recent work utilises a discursive psychology approach in which close attention is paid to how individuals produce accounts of their experiences and what these accounts can tell us about power. She has published in journals such as Human Relations, Journal of Management Studies, Work, Employment & Society, and the Journal of Occupational & Organizational Psychology.

Professor Steve Goodacre
S.Goodacre@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

My research interests are clinical trials in emergency medicine, economic analysis, the organisation of emergency care and methods for evaluating the quality of emergency care.

Dr Lindsay Blank
l.blank@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests:

General areas of interest

  • Healthy living topics such as healthy eating, physical activity, wellbeing


Specific areas of interest

  • Prevention and management of type 2 diabetes


Research methods I am able to supervise: 

  • Qualitative
  • Quantitative
  • Evaluation
  • Mixed methods
Dr Jon Burchell
J.Burchell@Sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

Jon's primary research interests focus upon issues of corporate social responsibility, sustainable development and business ethics. He is particularly interested in the interactions between businesses and third sector organisations. In addition, he is involved in the school's commitment to the United Nations Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME).

Dr Lorna Warren
l.warren@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Research interests

Much of my early research centred on social care for older people, though it also extended to other aspects of community and health care services and their impact on the lives of service users and carers. More recently, I have focussed on issues of representation in later life, looking at the construction and framing of ageing and care-giving. I draw from a mix of anthropological, social policy, sociological, social gerontological, and feminist perspectives and approaches and the intersection of gender and age has been a key focus of my work. My interests include social and cultural dimensions of ageing, intergenerational relations and informal or family care relationships, which I have explored predominantly through qualitative methods, including interviews, focus groups, observation (participant and non-participant), ethnography, life stories and more recently visual approaches. I recognise the importance of `user involvement´ and interdisciplinarity in research and am committed, in particular, to the development of participatory research, raising questions about how we come to know what we know about the lives of people who use services and the connection of this knowledge with policy and practice.

I have recently completed 2 major research projects:

The social process of everyday decision-making by people with dementia and their spouses, an ESRC-funded study carried out with Dr Geraldine Boyle (PI) which aimed to explore and raise awareness of the decision-making abilities of people with dementia. 

Representing Self – Representing Ageing,  part of the cross disciplinary New Dynamics of Ageing Programme: http://www.newdynamics.group.shef.ac.uk/ and which I carried out, as PI, with Professors Merryn Gott and Susan Hogan. Known more familiarly by the title of Look at Me! Images of Women and Ageing, the project worked with women in Sheffield to explore representations of women and ageing in the media and to produce new images to challenge existing stereotypes: http://www.representing-ageing.com/. I won an ESRC Outstanding Impact in Society Award for the project in 2014 and am continuing to extend the project's impact through activities including intergenerational work in schools.

My other research activities have included:

The ESRC Older Women’s Lives and Voices project, exploring issues affecting the quality of life of older women across different ethnic groups within Sheffield and their involvement in services available to them:

The European Commission funded MERI project (Mapping Existing Research and Identifying Knowledge Gaps Concerning the Situation of Older Women in Europe), a collaborative project involving 13 EC countries and designed to contribute to the development of European studies and policy to improve older women’s lives.

Postgraduate Supervision

I have supervised 9 students to successful completion at PhD (x 8) and MPhil (x 1) levels. I am currently primary supervisor of 1 full-time and 5 part-time PhD students, including a joint location student (Trinidad and Tobago). I welcome applications to study full-time or part-time with me for MPhil or PhD research degrees that are related to my activities and experience. I would be particularly interested in hearing from students who wish to undertake participatory research with older people and carers.

 

Professor Bill Lee
w.j.lee@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

I have published on a wide range of topics across the accounting, management and related disciplines including articles on the relationship between accounting and technological change, the professional socialization of junior auditors and the origins and history of qualitative research in accounting. My enduring research interests are those that allow me to combine the interests from my own education with my position in accounting. Thus, my research in recent years has tended to focus on two broad areas: Research Methods and Research Practice; and the intersection of accounting and accountability with the organization of work, opportunities for learning and government support of learning initiatives.

I am keen to supervise students who wish to conduct qualitative research studies in the areas of management accounting, public sector accounting, social accounting and accountability.

Dr Malcolm Patterson
m.patterson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

PhD Supervision

I am currently supervising PhD students in the following areas:

  • destructive leadership
  • emotions, moods and innovative work behaviour
  • knowledge sharing
  • organisational interventions to enhance employee engagement
  • start-up journeys of entrepreneurs
  • participative action research interventions to improve quality of patient care

I would welcome applications and inquiries in these areas and related areas corresponding to my areas of expertise listed above.

Publications

Knight, C;, Patterson, M.G, Dawson, J and Brown, J (2017). Building and sustaining work engagements- a participatory action intervention to increase work engagement in nursing staff. European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, 26(5) 634-649.

Knight, C;, Patterson, M. and Dawson, J. (2017). Building work engagement: A systematic review and meta-analysis investigating the effectiveness of work engagement interventions. Journal of Organizational Behavior Education, 38(6) 792-812.

Madrid, H.P. and Patterson, M.. Creativity at work as a joint function between openness to experience, need for cognition and organisational fairness. Learning and Individual Differences, forthcoming 2016.

Stephan, U., Patterson, M., Kelly, C. and Mair, J. (2016). Organizations driving positive social change: A reveiw and an intergrative framework of change processes. Journal of Management, 42(5) 2016.

Madrid, H., Patterson, M. and Leiva, P. (2015). Negative core affect and employee silence: How differences in activation, cognitive rumination and problem-solving demands matter. Journal of Applied Psychology, 100(6) 1887-1989.

Madrid, H.P., Patterson, M.G., Birdi, K.S. and Leiva, P.I. (2014). The role of weekly high-activated positive mood, context, and personality in innovative work behavior: A multilevel and interactional model. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 35(2) 234-256.

Full list of publications

 

Professor Frank Birkin
F.Birkin@Sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research Interests

I have both developed and applied my theoretical understanding in new practical management and accounting tools for sustainable development. For example, I won £300k+ European Union funding for an international project to develop a first account of the sustainable development performance of island tourism, Sustainable Tourism’s Environmental Protection System (STEPS) for islands. Also in close collaboration with Sheffield University’s Department of Civil Engineering, a team of environmental accounts of which I was a leading member have won over £1 million from the EPSRC for a series of projects relating to fresh and grey water management in the UK. My research has been published in wide-ranging international journals from Critical Perspectives on Accounting and the British Accounting Review to Business Strategy and the Environment and the International Journal of World Ecology and Sustainable Development. Recognition of my work has resulted in several international key-note speaker invitations, an invitation from the European Commission to participate in the development of a proposed service-sector eco-label and the co-hosting of a European conference on sustainable tourism in Venice with guest speakers from the European Commission, the United Nations Environment Programme, World Tourism Organisation, World Wide Fund for Nature as well as the national Italian environmental agency.

PhD Supervision:

  • Environmental and Social Accounting
  • Environmental Management Accounting
  • Accounting for Sustainable Development
  • Episteme change analysis
Dr Lien Monkhouse
L.L.Monkhouse@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

Following the achievement of an MBA degree (with Distinction) from the University of Leeds, Lien carried out her PhD research in consumer behaviour of East Asian luxury goods market. She has conducted peer review for a few marketing journals and conferences (for e.g. Journal of International Marketing, International Marketing Review, Journal of Business Research, Marketing Intelligence and Planning, AIB South East Asia conference, Academy of Marketing conference). Lien has a few papers in 3* journals and has presented at different international conferences in her research area.

Lien is currently supervising three PhD students at the Management school. When she has spare capacity again, she will welcome students who would like to research in the following areas: quantitative methods, luxury goods buyer behaviour, East Asian culture, acculturation, and consumer research in general.

Dr Jane McKeown
j.mckeown@sheffield.ac.uk

Nursing and Midwifery

My research interests are the care and involvement of people who have dementia and I am interested in research methods that enable people’s ‘voices to be heard’.

Professor Lenny Koh
s.c.l.koh@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

Prof. Koh's expertise lies in logistics/supply chain management, particularly in; low carbon futures/industries, low carbon supply chain, energy supply chain, environment and sustainability science, energy efficiency, and uncertainty management. She has also produced a considerable amount of research in production planning and control, enterprise resource planning, and information science. Professor Koh holds a First-class honours degree in Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering, and a Doctorate in Operations Management. 

Dr Ross Cameron
r.w.cameron@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Landscape Architecture

Research interests

My current research interests centre around green infrastructure and climate change mitigation, with a strong emphasis on providing recommendations on plant species choice with respect to eco-system function (city cooling, thermal insulation, flood tolerance, biodiversity enhancement, etc.). This includes currently supervising PhD projects on improving the thermal performance of buildings through appropriate plant selection e.g. on both green walls and green roofs. I am also interested in identifying those plant species robust enough to tolerate urban conditions (both current and future), whilst meeting their specifications for performance. Recent studies include investigations into Mediterranean species that tolerate winter flooding, and how warmer autumns affect development of young ornamental trees. 


Developing more sustainable landscape management techniques is also a key driver in much of my research, and I have been involved in a number of projects investigating more efficient use of resources (water, organic waste streams as soil amendments, alternative growing media and energy). I led a DEFRA LINK project - Efficient use of water in horticulture which proposed a 2/3 reduction in water use during the production of ornamental plants. This project involved 14 partner organizations and was rated 9/10 by DEFRA – one of the highest ranking scores at the time. I have also more recently conducted projects evaluating the use of grey water for landscape applications. I work closely with industry partners, for example the Horticultural Trades Association on the ‘carbon footprint’ of plant production and maintenance; and the Royal Horticultural Society on maximizing invertebrate biodiversity through appropriate use of garden ornamentals.

Dr Ros Williams
r.g.williams@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of Sociological Studies

My research falls at the intersections of Science and Technology Studies, Sociologies of Race and Ethnicity, and Digital Sociology.

My current and previous research includes:

  • exploration of institutional practices of stem cell banking which included looking at race classifications, legacies of health care inequity, and genetic understandings of racial differences in blood and tissue in a UK context
  • digital health and self-monitoring technologies - user, commercial and policy perspectives through ethnography, interview, and novel material methodologies
  • stem cell donor recruitment activities in minority communities including ethnography of minority community donor drives, and digital method-based analysis of online minority ethnicity recruitment campaigns that focus on mixed raced donors

Interested in supervising research students who are focused on the following topics (in UK and/or other national/regional/international contexts)

  • health activism - particularly targeted at, or taking place within, racialised communities
  • processes of racialisation (and, more generally, invocations of racial difference) within biomedical contexts
  • mixed raced experience, particularly in the context of health, and of new genetic sciences
  • the intersection of race/ethnicity and digital media in general
Dr Jorge Martins
Jorge.Martins@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Information School

Research interests

My research emphasises the role of organisational behaviour and theory in understanding technology-enabled processes of innovation and organisational change. My research focus revolves around four main domains:

  • Managing change in/ through technology-enhanced learning.
  • Organisational trust and managerial social capital as catalysts of IS adoption.
  • IM/KM strategy in technology-based organisations: decisions and actions that shape the future of high-technology organisations by establishing, maintaining, and enhancing the basis for competitive advantage.
  • Organisations’ total digitisation. End to end integration of digital assets: redefining traditional employee, customer, and partner relationships; rethinking management competencies and organizational boundaries.

Research supervision

I am interested in supervising PhD research projects in the areas of:

  • Technology-enhanced learning
  • Management of information technology
  • Trust
  • Organisational change
  • Information Systems change management
  • Knowledge management strategy
  • Entrepreneurship and innovation

 

Professor Susan Yeandle
s.yeandle@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

My research, publications and teaching have focused on the relationship between work and care in contemporary societies, and on how people manage caring roles and responsibilities throughout the life course.

I specialise in research with the potential for policy and practical impact, and have expertise in making complex research findings accessible to a wide range of audiences, wide experience of research design and methods, and extensive knowledge of policy on care, carers and employment.

I currently supervise PhD students studying the work of carers’ organisations (Jenny Read) and the provision of home care in Shanghai (Wenjing Jin), and welcome enquiries from prospective PhD students wishing to study topics in my specialist field.

Dr Sophie Whyte
Sophie.Whyte@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My broad research is focused on mathematical modelling within health economics. I have gained significant expertise and experience in two related areas:

  • Bayesian calibration of cancer natural history models: This is my main methodological research theme, please see MDM publication http://mdm.sagepub.com/content/31/4/625 and Example Excel model using the Metropolis Hastings algorithm to calibrate a state transition model available to down load from the Downloads box)
  • Early diagnosis of cancer: I have substantial experience having worked on more than 15 projects in this area of applied research.
  • In addition to these main research themes I have undertaken research to inform policy making: Health Technology Assessment (HTA) for NICE (https://www.shef.ac.uk/scharr/sections/heds/collaborations/tag) , and research as part of the Policy Research Unit in Economic Evaluation of Health and Care Interventions (EEPRU) for DH (http://www.eepru.org.uk/)
Ms Fiona Wilson
fiona.wilson@sheffield.ac.uk

Nursing and Midwifery
My research interests are in palliative and end of life care, particularly how people make decisions about care and service provision, and older people's care and access to services.  My methodological strengths are in participatory approaches and qualitative research methods. 
Dr Panayiota Alevizou
P.J.Alevizou@Sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Panayiotas’ research interests include: sustainability marketing, labelling, green identity, green branding of FMCGs, branding in the music industry and qualitative research methods.

She is interested in supervising students in various areas of sustainability marketing.

Professor Sumon Bhaumik
s.k.bhaumik@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research Interests

  1. Ownership, corporate governance and firm performance
  2. Banking and credit markets
  3. Impact of economic reforms

Areas of Research Supervision

  1. Corporate governance
  2. Corporate finance
  3. Financial sector regulations
Professor Colin Williams
C.C.Williams@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

Colin's broad research interests are in re-theorising the nature of economic development and investigating the implications for public policy. Spatially, his interests range across the full spectrum from local and regional economic development in the UK through to the restructuring of western economies, post-socialist societies and the third (majority) world. Much of his work focuses upon rethinking the meanings of 'economic' and 'development,' which directly feeds into the work of the Centre for Regional Economic and Enterprise Development (CREED).

Centre for Regional Economic and Enterprise Development

Colin's particular research interest is in studying the magnitude and character of the informal economy and evaluating different public policy approaches and initiatives for tackling this sphere.

Dr Angela Lin
a.lin@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Information School

Research interests

My research interests focus on:

  • information systems implementation
  •  use of IT in business
  • evaluation of information systems
  • the study of systems in use
  • users acceptance of systems
  • online consumer behaviours
  • information systems and technologies that support e-commerce
  • e-commerce business

Research supervision

I am interested in supervising PhDs in:

  • Management Information systems related projects.
Dr Hiroaki Watanabe
h.watanabe@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of East Asian Studies

Research interests

My research areas are Japanese/comparative political economy and the international relations in East Asia. I have published a book and journal articles on the politics of labour market deregulation in Japan in comparison to Italy, the revitalization of Japanese labour movement, and the politics of regulatory reform in financial supervision. My current research interests include the neoliberal diversification of the Japanese labour market, the political agency of Japan's community unions, union response to working poor, the transformation of Japanese capitalism under globalization, and the Sino-Japanese economic rivalry against a background of the regional economic integration in East Asia and the rise of China.

I have supervised PhD research on comparative politics of health insurance reform in Korea and Japan, the new security initiatives of the Koizumi and the second Abe administrations, and the impact of the China-ASEAN FTA on exports by Thai companies to China. I welcome PhD supervision on topics related to comparative labour politics, Japanese/comparative political economy under globalization and the international relations in East Asia.

Dr Stefania Vicari
s.vicari@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Stefania's overarching research interest is in dynamics of civic engagement on digital platforms of communication. Her approach to online data is based on a variety of textual analysis techniques - with an increasing focus on text analytics - informed by social network and framing theories. Stefania specifically focuses on:

  • Digital activism: Stefania's early research focused on how digital media ease upward and downward scale shifts (i.e., from local to transnational and vice versa) in framing grievances. Work in this camp investigated the Global Justice Movement and the World Social Forum. She is also particularly interested in social media use with relevance to public sphere processes in the context of protest events, issue publics, everyday talk. Her work in this field has specifically focused on interactional and deliberative processes in the Cuban blogosphere and on meaning construction on Twitter streams relevant to anti-austerity protests in Italy.
  • Digital health. Stefania is interested in the role of digital media in health democratizing processes, especially in processes of self-care, patient advocacy, health public debate, and health activism. Her main interest is in if, how and to what extent digital media may enhance bottom-up, patient-centred health practices. Stefania's work in this area is currently looking at online affordances for rare disease patient organisations in advocacy and activist dynamics and rare disease discourse practices on Facebook and Twitter.


Stefania has supervised PhD projects looking at different aspects of digital media use, among which, digital literacy, digital activism and online political participation. She is particularly interested in supervising students investigating digital activism, social media and health and/or who wish to apply digital methods approaches.

Mr Geoff Nichols
g.nichols@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

Geoff’s main research interests are volunteers in sports clubs and events; management of sports clubs run by volunteers and the volunteering legacy of sports events. Recent research has included the volunteering legacy of the 2002 Commonwealth Games, a national survey of sports clubs in the UK (for the Sport and Recreation Alliance), research into how sports clubs recruit new volunteers (for Sport England) and the experience of volunteers at the 2012 Olympic Games. He has worked on two previous national surveys of sports clubs (both also conducted for Sport England). Since 2009 he has chaired the Sports Volunteering Research Network. The network promotes research into sports volunteering through arranging research symposia and a newsletter. Network presentations are available at http://svrn.group.shef.ac.uk Most of Geoff’s research is conducted in collaboration with colleagues in other institutions, both in the UK and abroad. Prior to 2007 Geoff’s research focussed on the relationship between sport and crime reduction, especially for young people. This was the topic of Geoff´s PhD. Geoff was involved in six major programme evaluations and two national surveys, including a survey for the Home Office, into physically demanding activities for probation service clients (1997/8). Much of this work was incorporated into his 2007 book, `Sport and crime reduction: the role of sports in tackling youth crime,' which was written for policy makers and academics.

Professor Paul Tappenden
p.tappenden@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

• Health economic modelling
• Economic analyses of therapies for multiple sclerosis
• Economic analyses of cancer therapies
• Whole disease modelling

Professor Christopher Deery
c.deery@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Research interests

  • Cariology
  • Preventive dentistry, particularly fissure sealants
  • Evidence based dentistry
  • Child-centred dental research

 

My areas of particular research interests are cariology, preventive dentistry, research in primary dental care, evidence based dentistry and child focused research.

Professor Alan Brennan
a.brennan@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My fundamental interest is in mathematical modelling approaches to inform decision making in health and healthcare.

I have been heavily involved in health technology assessment and health economic evaluation of pharmaceuticals and interventions for both government bodies in the UK e.g NICE and internationally and also with pharmaceutical industry.

More recently I have engaged in a series of projects around wider behavioural and public health related modelling.

  • Use of modelling and data analysis to assess broader interventions
  • Assessing cost-effectiveness of new treatments for NICE
  • Bayesian methods in cost-effectiveness analysis to inform future research priorities (CHEBS)
  • Value of information and Bayesian methods to inform research priorities
  • Cost effectiveness modelling methods
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Diabetes, obesity, CHD Modelling
  • Pharmaco-economics
    - Alzheimer's
    - Renal disease
  • Health systems modelling
    - Cervical screening
    - Ambulance services
    - Re-engineering
Dr Harald Conrad
h.conrad@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of East Asian Studies

Research interests

Harald’s recent and ongoing research has focused on:

1. changes in Japanese human resource management practices which are related to the aging workforce.

2. the relationship between occupational pension and pay system reforms in Japan.

3. the role of Japanese labour unions in changes of company benefit systems since the 1990s.

4. UK institutional investors’ attitudes towards Japanese equities.

5. Economic sociology perspectives on the Japanese antique art trade.

I welcome in particular applications from prospective PhD students in the fields of Japanese management, business and economy.


Professor Andrew Simpson
andrew.simpson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

His current research interests are wide ranging but include:

How, or indeed whether, organisations use data in decision making processes. This also includes an interest in how data / information is misused.

The application of forecasting techniques within supply chains. In particular military spare parts supply chains, where the intermittent and low volumes of demand make forecasting complicated.

Lean within public sector contexts and how this is applied and the difficulties faced when trying to implement lean solutions.

Operations Strategy and how organisations think through their operational strategic choice during product design within regulated industries, with a focus on the regenerative medicine industry.

Mr John Stevens
j.w.stevens@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Research interests
  • the application of Bayesian methods in drug development
  • statistical methods in health economics
  • evidence synthesis
  • sample size determination under uncertainty
  • adaptive dose finding
Professor Allan Wailoo
a.j.wailoo@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Research interests
  • Economic evaluation including alongside clinical trials and decision modelling
  • Analysis of patient level data, particularly around health utilities
  • Social values and decision making, including equity and procedural preferences
Ms Annette Haywood
a.haywood@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

I am a qualitative researcher and my research interests include older adults, health inequalities and the integration of health and social care.

Professor Kate Morris
kate.morris@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Kate’s areas of interest are: family minded policy and practice, family participation in care and protection, the reform of safeguarding practice and child welfare inequalities. She is passionate about social work and the role of social work in supporting change. 

Kate supervises PhD students in the areas of family caring relationships, family interventions and family support. Kate is Co-Director of the Family Potential Research collaboration http://www.familypotential.org.

Dr Gillian Ragsdell
g.ragsdell@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Information School

Research interests

My main research interests are: Advancement of theories and practice of knowledge management with emphasis on a 'joined up' approach and using participative research strategies. The voluntary sector and engineering projects are particularly interesting contexts for my research. 


PhD supervision  

Some potential topics include: Knowledge Management - develop and implementation of KM strategies including processes such as knowledge creation, sharing, dissemination and use. 

Dr Ranis Cheng
r.cheng@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

Her main research areas are corporate identity, corporate branding, branding and fashion retail operations. Her work has been published in the European Journal of Marketing, The Journal of Product & Brand Management.

Her current research projects include:

  • Relationships between corporate branding, internal branding and employer branding
  • Students’ perceptions of SME marketing
  • Graduates’ employability within the SMEs sector


Dr Erica Ballantyne
e.e.ballantyne@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research

 

Erica is a member of the Logistics and Supply Chain Management (LSCM) Research Centre, and the Centre for Energy, Environment and Sustainability (CEES), and the Advanced Resource Efficiency Centre (AREC) here at the University of Sheffield.

Research interests include: Sustainable urban freight transport and logistics operations; city logistics; sustainable urban supply chains; and local authority freight transport planning and policy decision making. She welcomes exploring future collaborations with industry partners and research academics.

Prospective PhD candidates

Erica is interested in supervising doctoral students in the field of logistics, freight transport and supply chain management. In particular, she is keen to supervise students who have an interest in using qualitative methods in logistics related research. Prospective PhD students with related research interests are invited to send a research proposal and a CV for consideration.

Publications

Ballantyne, E.E.F., Lindholm, M. and Whiteing, A.W. (2013). A comparative study of urban freight transport planning: addressing stakeholder needs. Journal of Transport Geography, 32 93- 101.

Ballantyne, E.E.F. and Boodoo, A. (2010). Freight in an Eco-town: How does freight fit into eco-town planning? Logistics and Transport Focus, 12(6) 28-32.

Full list of publications

Mr Dermot Breslin
D.Breslin@Sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

Following the completion of his PhD in 2009, the specific focus of Dermot's research has been to develop an evolutionary approach to study changing behaviour in organisations (see www.learningtoevolve.com). To date he has published and reviewed papers in a number of international peer-reviewed journals and conferences. Dermot has also acted as guest editor for the International Journal of Organizational Analysis, Journal of Management & Governance, is associate editor with the International Journal of Management Reviews, and has co-organised evolutionary tracks at the EURAM annual conference. Dermot remains closely engaged with practice through consulting/research projects. These projects focus on the emergence and evolution of key competences and routines within organizations. In this ongoing research Dermot is working on a variety of approaches including longitudinal ethnographical studies, experimental methods and agent-based simulation modeling techniques.

Dermot is interested in supervising PhD students in the following broad areas:

  • Evolutionary approaches in socio-economic change
  • The emergence and evolution of behaviors in organizations
  • Organisational adaptation and ambidexterity
  • Organisational co-evolution and multi-level studies


Professor Majella Kilkey
m.kilkey@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Research interests / Areas of Supervision

International migration

Intra-EU mobility

Transnational families

Migration and care

British emigration

Citizenship

Fathering

 

Professor Paul Norman
P.Norman@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Psychology

Research interests

Health Psychology; predicting and changing health behaviour; habit and health behaviour; intention-behaviour relations; planning and implementation intentions; self-affirmation; binge drinking.

Dr Christopher Carroll
c.carroll@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Research interests
  • Systematic review and evidence synthesis of medical, health and social science topics, including qualitative and mixed method evidence synthesis
  • The Health Technology Assessment (HTA) process
  • Information retrieval and programme evaluation (implementation fidelity) research
Ms Katie Powell
K.Powell@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Broad areas of research interest:

  • Health Inequalities

Research Methods I am able to supervise:

  • Qualitative

Specific areas of interest:

  • Community development/engagement
  • Voluntary sector
  • Geographical areas of deprivation
  • Health improvement initiatives
  • Social exclusion
Professor Petra Meier
p.meier@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Research interests
  • Alcohol policies and their effectiveness, especially pricing, marketing and availability policies
  • Co-occurrance of health behaviours - smoking, drinking, diet, exercise
  • Determinants of substance use, misuse and addiction
  • Substance misuse treatment evaluation and outcome
  • Co-occurring mental health problems and substance misuse (dual diagnosis)
  • Health inequalities
Dr Huiping Xian
h.xian@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research

Her research interests include women's careers, HRM issues in Chinese organisations, qualitative research methods, cross-cultural research and translation issues in international research. Her current projects include ‘Developing Women’s Careers in Japan’ which is funded by the British Academy.

PhD Supervision

Currently, Huiping is supervising a PhD project, which looks into female knowledge workers' flexible work and career development. She is interested in supervising in the following topics:

  • Management Issues in China
  • Qualitative Methods
  • Cross-cultural Research
  • Gender Studies

Professional Activities, Recognition and Other Information

Huiping is a HEA Fellow.

Publications

Xian, H.P., Atkinson, C. and Meng-Lewis, Y. Guanxi and High Performance Work System: Evidence from a Chinese State-owned Enterprise. International Journal of Human Resource Management, forthcoming 2017.

Woodhams, C., Xian, H.P. and Lupton, B. (2015). Women Managers’ Careers in China: Theorizing the Influence of Gender and Collectivism. Human Resource Management (US), 54(6) 913-931.

Xian, H.P. (2015). Leftover Women: The Resurgence of Gender Inequality in China. Gender in Management: An International Journal, 30(2) 179-182.

Woodhams, C., Lupton, B. and Xian, H.P. (2009). The persistence of gender discrimination in China – evidence from recruitment advertisements. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 20(10) 2084-2106.

Xian, H.P and Woodhams, C. (2008). Managing careers: Experiences of successful women in the Chinese IT industry. Gender in Management: An International Journal, 23(6) 409-425.

Xian, H.P. (2008). Lost in translation? Language, culture and roles of translator in cross-cultural management research. Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, 3(3) 231-245.

Full list of publications

Dr Jilly Gibson-Miller
jilly.gibson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Psychology

Research interests

I am a HPC-Registered Health Psychologist with interests in public health issues, health inequalities and young peoples' health-related issues. My main research focus lies in the prediction and self-regulation of behaviour; and designing behaviour change interventions to help young people make positive changes to their health-related behaviour. I am particularly interested in risk behaviour and work in the behavioural domains of obesity, sexual health and alcohol use. Along with professionals from a range of health-related disciplines, I have been involved in developing and delivering behaviour change interventions in both clinical and field settings; these interventions utilise psychologically-based strategies to help individuals (and their families, where appropriate) change unhealthy behaviour patterns and adopt new and healthier patterns.

Professor Matt Stevenson
m.d.stevenson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Research interests
  • My research interests are discrete event simulation, individual patient modelling and mathematical modelling
Professor Barend van Hout
b.a.vanhout@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

I have extensive experience in modelling and have contributed to the methodology of economic evaluation in various areas. In 1993 I was one of the earliest researchers to apply discrete event models and was the first to apply a non-parametric method to estimate costs in the presence of censoring[1]. In 1994 I was the first to apply Fieller´s approach to calculate confidence intervals around cost-effectiveness ratios, and I introduced the acceptability curve, which is now a well known concept in cost effectiveness analysis[2]. In 1996 I was one of the first to apply probabilistic sensitivity analysis[3]. In 2000 I was one of the initial people to explore Bayesian techniques in economic evaluation[4]. I have had work published on discounting[5] and estimating utility functions[6].

I am one of the founding members of the EuroQol group and I currently enjoy chairing the valuation task force within the EQ-5D group. My experience covers several therapeutic areas, including renal disease, cancer, osteoporosis, sepsis, schizophrenia, blood safety and most notably cardiovascular disease. My main interest concerns the use of elegant techniques, mostly to solve practical problems, but sometimes also because of the elegance itself.

Dr Katy Cooper
k.l.cooper@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My research interests include:

• Systematic reviews of clinical effectiveness for healthcare interventions
• Development of methods for systematic reviewing and evidence synthesis, including rapid review methods
• Systematic reviews of complex interventions 
• Patient safety and quality of care
• Complementary and alternative medicine research

Dr Ines Henriques Cadby
i.henriquescadby@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

My current research focuses on hospital performance and the quality of care offered to patients based on the analysis of large routine observational datasets.

My work in pure mathematics has focused on commutative and homological algebra, with connections to representation theory, algebraic geometry and singularity theory. 

Professor John Brazier
j.e.brazier@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

SF-6D preference-based index

  • Developed by Brazier et al (2002). Syntax files available fromhttp://www.shef.ac.uk/scharr/sections/heds/mvh/sf-6d
  • International valuation studies in Japan, Hong Kong, Portugal, Brazil, Australia and Singapore
  • Comparisons to other generic preference-based measures

Deriving preference-based measures from condition specific measures

  • Published studies: Kings Health Questionnaire, Atopic Dermatitis in Children, Menopausal specific health related quality of life questionnaire, Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire, Overactive Bladder Questionnaire, Sexual Functioning Questionnaire.
  • Current studies: Dementia Quality of Life (DEMQoL), Epilepsy QoL battery.

Modelling preference data

  • Applying Bayesian methods to estimating preference-based algorithms
  • Estimating health state values from ordinal data (rank and DCE)

Validity of EQ-5D across medical conditions.

Mapping from condition specific and other generic measures onto EQ-5D

  • Recent and ongoing trial based economic evaluations: Complementary therapy (YACBAC trial), treatments for varicose veins, computerised cognitive behavioural therapy in MS, Borderline Personality Disorder (SPeDi trial)
  • Model based economic evaluations: computerised cognitive behavioural therapy (NICE), Dialectical behavioural therapy for Borderline Personality Disorder (HTA)

Examining the relationship between health and well-being (and the role of adaptation)

Dr Vanessa Halliday
vanessa.halliday@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My primary research interest focusses on nutrition and dietetics, in particular the prevention and treatment of undernutrition in vulnerable population groups.  I have experience of using quantitative approaches, including the development of health measurement scales, as well as qualitative research.

Professor Eva Kaltenthaler
e.kaltenthaler@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests:

My main interest is in the use of systematic review methods in health technology assessment.
My research interests are:
the use of rapid review methods
the review of evidence in cost effectiveness models
the use of evidence by poilcy makers

Dr Abigail Millings
a.millings@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Psychology

Research interests

Adult attachment relationships and family dynamics. Computerised therapy and e-health. Applying relationships psychology to assistive technology.

Dr Pamela Lenton
p.lenton@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Economics

Research interests

Pamela's research interests lie in the economics of education, labour economics and health. Pamela's primary interest is education economics. More recently Pamela has focused on the areas of household debt and health and the problems faced by the financially excluded. This is joint work with Paul Mosley and a book of the empirical research undertaken in UK cities will be published later this year. Pamela has also just completed an economic analysis of the Psychiatric Morbidity Survey (with Jenny Roberts and John Brazier) which was funded by the National Institute for Health Research.

Dr Kamaljit Birdi
K.Birdi@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School
Research interests
  • Creativity and innovation in the workplace
  • Evaluation of training and development activities
  • Identifying factors influencing the effectiveness of workplace learning
  • E-learning
  • Organisational learning
  • Inter-organisational collaboration
Dr Marta Herrero
m.herrero@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

Marta's primary research interest is in the economic foundations of the arts and culture. She is currently working on three projects:

  1. Philanthropy as a funding mechanism for the arts. She has set up a network of academics to study the impact of arts philanthropy in an international context, with collaborators at HEC, Montreal, and the University of Alberta, Canada.
  2. The economic impact of the Cultural Industries in a research collaboration with the Workstation (Sheffield).
  3. International art markets: Principal investigator in a British Academy funded project, with Ling-Yun Tang (University of Hong Kong), exploring the impact of organisational business cultures on the sale and marketing of contemporary Chinese art in the London and Hong Kong art markets.
Dr Liz Sharp
l.sharp@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Urban Studies and Planning

Research interests

I focus on the governance of the environment, and specifically the processes through which the public are engaged (or not) in making and implementing environmental policy.

The two central research questions that my research addresses are:

  1. What new patterns of water governance are emerging and how do they serve the sustainability goals of adaptation to climate change and effective public engagement?
  2. How can interpretive research collaborate with more traditional approaches to science and water practice in driving forward new patterns of water governance?

The main empirical focus for my work is water policy including water supply and demand, water in the landscape, and flooding. Some elements of my work have also looked at waste and energy policy.

Dr Christopher Stride
c.b.stride@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research interests

Specific projects that Chris is currently working on include:

  • The effects of perfectionism on well-being
  • Cheating in sport; is it a team, individual or circumstantial act?
  • From pitch to plinth; a study of statues of sportsmen and sportswomen (see http://www.sportingstatues.com)
  • The psychology of nostalgia and the use of nostalgia branding
  • The effect of the built environment and residential outdoor space upon well-being in older people


Dr Jill Thompson
jill.thompson@sheffield.ac.uk

Nursing and Midwifery

Research Interests

  • Health service access
  • Participatory approaches
  • Patient and Public involvement
  • Health Literacy

I am a qualitative researcher and my research interests centre on working with vulnerable groups to explore ways in which they are enabled to actively participate in their health/health systems.

 

Dr Mario Vettore
m.vettore@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Research interests

My research interests include the link between oral conditions and general health, inequalities in oral health, social determinants of oral health and oral health related quality of life. My expertise involves quantitative methods and statistical multi-level modeling as well as systematic reviews and meta-analysis.

Dr Gwen Robinson
G.J.Robinson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Law

Research Interests

  • Community sanctions/penalties
  • Offender rehabilitation and management
  • Restorative justice

Areas of Research Supervision

  • Community sanctions/penalties and their administration
  • Offender management and rehabilitation
  • Restorative Justice
Dr China Mills
china.mills@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

China's teaching philosophy is rooted in the respect of student diversity and the co-creation of knowledge within the learning environment. She has supported a diverse range of students, many of whom have English as an additional language, experience mental health issues, and/or have additional needs.

Professor Jonathan Linton
j.linton@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research

Professor Linton’s research considers management challenges that involve uncertainty and non-steady state conditions. This includes: non-steady state behavior of technology-intense entrepreneurial firms, assessment and management of R&D projects and portfolios, firms and knowledge pathways to commercialization, opportunity recognition of the economic and social benefits associated with science and technological discoveries, close loop supply chains, continuous and discontinuous learning, and unintended consequences of innovation and change. Besides being trained as a traditional quantitative social science researcher, Jonathan utilizes qualitative research or modeling depending on what set of approached is most appropriate for the question or problem of interest.

PhD Supervision

Jonathan is interested in supervising PhD students in the following areas:

  • Management of Emerging technologies (Internet of Things (IOT), Additive Manufacture (3D Printing), Quantum Technologies, Factor of the Future, Advanced Manufacturing, Advanced Materials)
  • Decision support relating to management of technologies or big science, Technology, Innovation Policy, R&D Management.
  • Commercialization of Innovation
  • Emerging Technology Supply Chains
  • Real Options and Portfolios
  • Close Loop Supply Chains
  • Decision Support for Process Innovation
  • R&D Management
  • Technological Entrepreneurship
Professor Aki Tsuchiya
a.tsuchiya@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Economics
School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

  • measuring, valuing, and modelling health, and other aspects of well-being
  • incorporating equity concerns into social welfare functions
  • normative economics of health and beyond


Professor Fiona Lecky
f.e.lecky@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

Fiona’s research interests include: Traumatic Brain Injury, Major Trauma, Biomarkers in Emergency Care and Injury Epidemiology. Latterly she has been Chair of the College of Emergency Medicine Research Committee – successfully setting up PhD studentships for Trainee Emergency Physicians, and the NW EM Walport Programme lead with a competitive ACF programme.
Recent publications include those looking at trends in trauma outcome and clinical effectiveness in trauma care and venour thromboembolism with a particular focus on head injury.

Professor James Hitchmough
j.d.hitchmough@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Landscape Architecture

Research interests

Since the mid 1980's my main research interests have centred around the ecology, design and management of herbaceous vegetation. In Australia this lead to the development of a still active research group in the restoration ecology of Australian native grasslands. Whilst I still have a strong interest in "native" semi-natural herbaceous vegetation, increasingly I have re-interpreted ecologically based herbaceous vegetation in the cultural context of the public greenspace of towns and cities. This has resulted in a large volume of research on the creation of various native and non-native meadow, steppe and prairie vegetation from sowing seed in situ. This vegetation is designed to be much more sustainable than the traditional herbaceous plantings, however the main goal of the work is to produce ecologically informed herbaceous plant communities that are highly attractive to the lay public. The research employs standard restoration ecology methodologies and involves rigorous collection and statistical analysis data. As my interest in these new vegetation types has developed so has my desire to find out more about the aesthetic values and preferences of the public as they relate to urban vegetation. This has resulted in the development of a complementary strand of research based on the application of Environmental Psychology methodologies to designed urban vegetation.

Dr Sarah Drabble
S.J.Drabble@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

  • Endometriosis
  • Self-management of long-term conditions 
  • Process evaluations of trials using qualitative methods
  • Qualitative research methods
Dr Hannah Fairbrother
h.fairbrother@sheffield.ac.uk

Nursing and Midwifery
My principal research focus is on socioeconomic inequalities in health, particularly as they relate to children, young people and families. This is a longstanding interest and stems from my upbringing in Sheffield, a city of contrasts in health and wealth, visiting family in Anfield, Liverpool and through voluntary work in Cambridge with young mothers and with children in a disadvantaged area of Paris.

I am particularly interested in:
- Work to understand and address the underlying causes of inequalities in health
- Public perspectives, particularly children and young people’s perspectives, on and understandings of inequalities in health and their relationship with broader societal inequalities
- The role of health and wider policy (a health in all policies approach) and the potential for whole systems approaches to facilitate coordinated action in reducing inequalities in health
- The importance of children and young people’s health literacy practices in making sense of, interacting with and responding to health information.

I mobilise a variety of different methods to explore these key interests, including critical policy analysis, systematic and narrative literature review, participatory interviews, creative workshops, observation and systems mapping.
Dr Steven Robertson
s.robertson@sheffield.ac.uk

Nursing and Midwifery
Steve has 25yrs research and evaluation experience in the field of men, gender and health with particular emphasis on health promotion/public health and men's mental wellbeing. More recently, he has been developing an additional portfolio of nursing research relating to safe and effective staffing, CPD, and developing roles (particularly Nursing Associates and Advanced Nursing Practice). He is primarily a qualitative researcher with expertise in Thematic Analysis, data integration and critical realism.
Dr Emanuela Girei
e.girei@sheffield.ac.uk

Sheffield University Management School

Emanuela is interested in supervising qualitative research (especially but not exclusively in the non-profit sector) in the areas of management and social change, international development, diversity and equality, organisational change and development.

Professor Gail Mountain
g.a.mountain@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My research interests are focussed upon improving the quality of life of older people through provision of appropriate interventions, good design and by facilitating participation. I am particularly interested in improving the lived experiences of people at all stages of the dementia trajectory.

Professor Michelle Holdsworth
michelle.holdsworth@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

The common thread in my research is combining qualitative and quantitative approaches to answer interdisciplinary research questions in public health nutrition.  The research approach integrates social science with that of public health nutrition, to investigate determinants of health behaviour at an individual level, within the context of social and ecological determinants of health, followed by studies of policy processes that directly feed into informing preventive strategies.

  • Behavioural determinants of diet at an individual level, e.g. psycho-social determinants of dietary behaviour and healthy body weight.
  • Environmental level determinants of diet (societal, cultural, economic).
  • Linking research, policy and practice.  Consulting with stakeholders including industry and government on the development of policy and public health action for healthier diets.
  • Effectiveness of population-level interventions to improve diet.

I have significant research experience which has involved working in different cultural contexts (especially the UK, North Africa, sub-Saharan Africa and more recently in Asia), falling broadly within three areas of public health nutrition:  nutrition transition in low and middle-income countries, migration and its impact on diet, obesity policy development and integrating sustainability into nutrition policy.  I lead a multidisciplinary research theme of 'Food, Nutrition and Society'.

Professor Sarah Baker
s.r.baker@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Research interests

My principal research interest relates to the psychological and social factors which influence how people cope with chronic oral health conditions and their treatment. Such conditions include cleft lip and palate, oral cancer, orthognathic conditions, xerostomia, periodontal disease and edentulousness. This programme of work investigates the psychosocial factors which influence individual’s experiences of their oral health and the impact on well-being and quality of life. Understanding the role of such factors – sense of coherence, self esteem, social support networks, coping strategies, stress and resilience – allows us to explore potential mechanisms by which oral health impacts on individual’s daily lives and, in turn, develop intervention strategies that have the potential to improve health and well-being.

Other research interests include a critical examination of the conceptual foundations of oral health quality of life concepts, together with methodological and statistical approaches within the OHQoL field. Much of this research involves modelling the biopsychosocial determinants of oral health and well-being across the lifecourse using statistical techniques such as, structural equation modelling. 


Professor Jennifer Roberts
j.r.roberts@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Economics

Research interests

Jenny's research interests centre on applied microeconometrics, particularly the interaction of health and labour market outcomes, health-related behaviours, health valuation, the economics of well-being and travel behaviours. She is currently leading a large, innovative, EPSRC-funded project, 'Reflect: Experienced utility and travel behaviour, a feasibility study', which uses smartphones to gather real-time data on commuting experiences, and to feed this back to them in various ways. The ultimate aim is to influence travel behaviour by encouraging people to reflect on their experience and those of other people.

Jenny is interested in supervising PhD students in applied microeconometrics, especially those with topics that are in line with the research interests described here.


Dr Xiao Chen
xiao.chen@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering

 

Research Interests:

 

  • Manufacturing-led innovation in electrical machines
  • Multi-phase fault tolerant electrical machines for more electric aircraft
  • Digital twin of electrical machines and drive
  • High-speed electrical machines for traction
  • Low-cost electrical machines
  • Powertrain energy management for electric vehicles
Dr Zhong Zhang
zhong.zhang@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of East Asian Studies

Research interests

Dr. Zhang’s research focuses on Chinese corporate governance from a legal perspective. Related to this, his research interests lie in two broader areas: Chinese (business) law and Chinese business and management. He is also interested in the subjects of law and development, and law and finance. 

Dr Chantelle Wood
chantelle.wood@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Psychology

Research interests

I am a social psychologist, with a particular focus on social cognition. My key research interests are in stereotyping and prejudice reduction, and the broader area of social and health behaviour change (particularly interventions such as the question-behaviour effect, and implementation intentions).

Dr Jesse Matheson
j.matheson@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of Economics

Jesse’s research focuses in applied micro-econometrics, with contributions to public, labour and health economics. His research agenda focuses on understanding, and empirically identifying, the influence that economic and social environment have on individual choice.

Recent examples include a large randomised field experiment, run with a UK Police Force, which found that improving the access to public support services for victims of domestic violence leads to more efficient use of police resources. He also has a series of projects that measure the effect of social environment on individual decision making in the context of smoking, marital decisions, and raising children.

Jesse is interested in supervising PhD students working in applied micro-econometrics. Specifically, he is interested in three areas: estimating social interactions and social spill-overs; the economics of health, particularly with respect to individual choice; and urban sorting and amenities.

Dr Vitaveska Lanfranchi
v.lanfranchi@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Computer Science

Her research has a fundamental interdisciplinary nature, and has developed both in industry and in academia. It concerns the intersection among ubiquitous computing, knowledge capture and visualization and human computer interaction in fields as diverse emergency response, mobility, smart cities, manufacturing, aerospace and more recently wellbeing. Her research focuses on user participatory design methods to develop novel methodologies and interfaces for ubiquitous and mobile computing.

Professor Glenys Parry
G.D.Parry@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My interests include the application of research to policy and practice, service evaluation, process and outcomes of psychotherapy in health service settings and psychotherapeutic competence.

Recent research includes an evaluation of the new model of psychological service delivery "Improving Access to Psychological Therapies" and an investigation into research-based methods of improving the quality and effectiveness of psychological services for people with long term depression.

Dr Emily Wood
e.f.wood@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Areas of interest:
Mental Health
Spiritual Care
Health Services research
Mixed methods research
 
Methods:
Qualitative
Mixed Methods
Systematic Review
Single Case experimental design
 
Specific interests:
Treatment for long term depression
Mental health and physical health
Spirituality and mental health
Pain and depression
EMDR
Public mental health 
Global mental health
Developing complex interventions for mental health conditions
Mental Health Staff

Dr Emma Hock
Emma.Hock@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

• Systematic review
• Systematic review methodology
• Health behaviour change
• Physical activity and wellbeing

Dr Inge Kersbergen
i.kersbergen@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
  • Nudge interventions
  • Alcohol consumption
  • Addiction
  • Weight stigma
  • Health psychology
Dr Amy Barnes
a.barnes@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

I am  broadly interested in public health policy processes, partnership and wider determinants of health.

My more specific research interests focus on:

1. issues of power, participation and partnership in public health policy processes;

2. the role of civil society (community) organisations and community development approaches in the public health system and specifically in relation to addressing wider determinants of health and wellbeing; and

3. complex/systems approaches to policy evaluation.

 

Dr Fuschia Sirois
f.sirois@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Psychology

 Research Interests:

Health Psychology; Psychological factors that confer risk or resilience for physical health and well-being; positive adjustment to long term health conditions and chronic illness; stress and coping

Personality and health; self-regulation of health behaviours; self-compassion, gratitude, time perspective; procrastination, perfectionism; role of emotions in self-regulation

Psychological factors in the use of complementary and alternative medicine.

Dr Elizabeth Such
e.such@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

My research interests are:-

  • public health and health services research, particularly relating to black, minority ethnic and other marginalised groups
  • migrant health;
  • leisure and everyday, relational life;
  • physical activity and health, particularly in relation to children, young people and families
  • policy making and outcomes in the fields of employment, health and sport;
  • sedentary lifestyles and 'sit less' interventions.
Professor Fabio Ciravegna
f.ciravegna@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Computer Science

Research interests

Focus is on knowledge and information management over large scale. The research covers 3 main areas:

• How to capture information over large scale (the Web, the Social Web, distributed organisational archives, mobile devices, drones, sensors, etc.)

• How to use the captured information (e.g. for knowledge management, business intelligence, customer analysis, management of large scale events via social media, etc.)

• How to communicate the information (to final users, problem owners, etc.).

Research areas covered are knowledge and information management, Web technologies, human computer interaction, search technologies and natural language processing.

Prof Ciravegna’s research income since 2006 tops £7 million, of which about 10% directly from industry (e.g., Rolls-Royce plc).

Dr Simon Rushton
simon.rushton@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Politics and International Relations
Research interests
  • Global health politics
  • Global governance
  • International institutions
  • Security studies

I am always happy to hear from students considering a PhD in any area of global health politics, or in global governance, international institutions or security studies more broadly.

Dr Emily Wood
e.f.wood@sheffield.ac.uk

Nursing and Midwifery
My research interests are primarily around mental health staffing and the nursing role in health services. Methodologies include qualitative and mixed methods and single case experimental design.
Dr Antonino Sgalambro
A.Sgalambro@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

PhD Supervision

Some PhD projects are currently open for students with scientific interests in the following areas:

  • Optimisation in Logistics, Operations and Supply Chain Management
  • Efficient algorithms for NP-Hard problems in Network and Discrete Optimisation
  • Locational Analysis and Spatial Decision Making
  • Optimisation for Safety, Security and Emergency problems
  • DSS in Humanitarian Logistics and Healthcare Management

For further information on PhD open projects please send a message with your CV to: a.sgalambro@sheffield.ac.uk

Professor Penny Curtis
p.a.curtis@sheffield.ac.uk

Nursing and Midwifery

Research Interests

My research interests are broadly focused on childhood and youth, children´s lives, intergenerational relations and the health and well-being of families.

Dr Munira Essat
m.essat@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

      • Systematic review of evidence for clinical effectiveness in healthcare

 

      • Health policy and decision making

 

      • Systematic review methodology
Professor Karim Hadjri
k.hadjri@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Architecture

Inclusive/age-friendly design; Ageing-in-place: accessible design; Design for health and wellbeing; Design of dementia-friendly environments; Design of enabling environments.

Dr Ana Vasconcelos
a.c.vasconcelos@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Information School

Research interests

My research interests focus on the relationship between the management of information and knowledge, systems and innovation practices.

Specific interests are:

  • knowledge sharing
  • knowledge boundaries and boundary spanning activities
  • knowledge absorption, absorptive capacity and innovation
  • information failure and organizational learning
  • online identities, communities of practice and virtual communities
  • information systems adaptation

I bring a perspective to these themes influenced by Arenas/Social Worlds Theory, Practice Theory and approaches such as Discourse Analysis and Grounded Theory.

I am interested in supervising PhDs in the above areas.

 

Professor Helen Rodd
h.d.rodd@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Research interests

My current research programme is driven by Health and Social policy which have highlighted the need to be more inclusive of children in decisions about their healthcare, as well as involving them more actively in health-related research and service development. In line with this, a key research objective is to develop robust patient-centred clinical outcome measures for use in dentistry. These will have important application within the NHS in determining the benefits of various treatment modalities in order to more effectively direct resource allocation.

I work within a unique multi-disciplinary research group at the University of Sheffield, the ‘Person Centered and Population Oral Health’ group, which includes researchers across several clinical specialities and social sciences. The group conducts and implements high quality research in oral health, utilising the theories and empirical traditions of dental public health, sociology and psychology and a range of methodologies.

Dr Juliana Matos De Meira
j.m.meira@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Juliana’s research interests range from management accounting to inter-disciplinary accounting.

 

PhD supervision:

 

Juliana would be interested in supervising students with projects on:

  • supply chain and accounting,
  • managing reverse logistics, retails returns, and circular economy
  • performance measurement and balanced scorecard
  • strategic management accounting, including beyond budgeting
  • accounting and human resource management, including HR monitoring in the supply chain and cost-benefit analysis of adaptations for people with disabilities at work

She is interested in all three aspects of sustainability: people, profits and planet. Juliana has also an interest in extending her research to include environmental accounting, closing the sustainability loop. Her research is based on mixed methods, utilising mainly case studies and surveys as methodological approaches.

Dr Mark Tomlinson
mark.tomlinson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Research interests

  • Poverty and deprivation (measurement and impacts)
  • Labour markets, skills and training
  • Innovation systems and the learning economy
  • The relationships between social, innovation and industrial policy
  • Socio-economic indicators
  • Advanced multivariate methods (such as Structural Equation Models, panel regression, neural networks)

I am an interdisciplinary scholar having worked in economics, management, innovation studies and sociology over the past two decades. My main interests at the moment are in labour processes and labour market disdvantage (which includes skills, learning, organisational effects on human capital development, and the contribution labour makes to innovation systems etc). I also have a strong interest in poverty research in general.

I broadly follow an economic sociological approach and use quantitative methods. I also try to apply my research to the real world in terms of policy development.

Dr Chiara Orsini
c.orsini@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of Economics

Chiara ‘s research is in Applied Microeconometrics and lies at the intersection of Labor Economics, Health Economics, and Public Economics. Chiara studies the behaviour of individuals, firms, and governments, and her research tries to understand intended and unintended effects of public policies, effects of innovation, issues relevant for the design of markets, inequality, consumer response to information, and the transmission of human capital.

Chiara is interested in supervising dissertations in Applied Microeconometrics, especially on topics related to the production of health and impact of healthcare policies.

Professor Cindy Cooper
C.L.Cooper@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

  • Trials methodology, particularly pilot (external and internal) and feasibility studies, recruitment and retention
  • Psycho-social aspects of long term conditions
  • Mental health research
  • Health technology evaluation
  • Evaluation of psychotherapeutic interventions
Dr Hazel Squires
h.squires@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My research interests involve the use of decision-analytic modelling to help with policy decisions. In particular, this includes the use of health economic modelling for assessing the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of Public Health interventions. Key methodological interests include conceptual modelling and individual-level simulation.

Professor Simon Dixon
s.dixon@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Broad area of research interests:

  • Health economics
  • Economic evaluation

Methods I am able to supervise:

  • Economic evaluation
  • Preference elicitation

Specific area of research interests: 

  • Economic evaluation alongside controlled trials
  • Valuation of non-health outcomes
  • Process utility
  • Willingness to pay methodology
  • Decison rules for reimbursement
  • Transferability of economic evaluations
  • Global Health
Dr Duncan Gillespie
duncan.gillespie@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
My fundamental interest is in informing decision making in health and healthcare.
  • Health economic modelling of public health policies, particularly relating to tobacco and alcohol.
  • Social inequalities in the effects of policies and interventions.
  • Demographic change and forecasting, particularly trends in cause-specific mortality.
  • Lifecourse dynamics of health and the social determinants of health
  • Commercial determinants of health.
  • Individual-based modelling methodologies.
  • Methods for improving the reproducibility and transparency of modelling research.
  • The integration of qualitative research with mathematical modelling methods.
Dr Caroline Hart
c.hart@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Caroline Hart has a range of active research interests related to the roles of education and health in human development. She is an inter-disciplinary researcher and her conceptual work has been principally concerned with notions of aspiration, capabilities, well-being and social justice.

Mr Abdullah Pandor
a.pandor@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My research interests are:

  • Systematic review and meta-analysis of evidence for clinical effectiveness
  • Application and development of methods for the systematic review and synthesis of diagnostic evaluations in the field of health services research
  • Network meta-analysis (indirect and mixed treatment comparisons)
Dr Donna Rowen
d.rowen@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
  • Measuring and valuing health and quality of life
  • Modelling preference data
  • Methodology of developing preference-based measures of health from existing measures
  • Mapping between measures to generate utility values
  • Measuring and valuing child health
Dr Jonathan Davidson
Jonathan.Davidson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering

I have a number of research interests and is particularly interested in areas that cross traditional subject boundaries. My research interests include

  • Resonant power conversion
  • Piezoelectric transformers for power converters
  • Thermal management and temperature estimation in power electronic and energy storage systems
  • Sensor technologies
  • Rapid impedance spectroscopy techniques
  • Power electronics

Please get in touch if you’d like to pursue a PhD in an area related to these themes.

Dr Devianee Keetharuth
d.keetharuth@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My research interests include outcome measurement,  psychometrics, economic evaluation and current health policy analysis including PROMs. I am also interested in economic evaluation of mental health policies and community services.

Professor Barry Gibson
b.j.gibson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Research interests

The primary focus on my research has been the experience of oral health conditions and to this end I have been instrumental in securing funding from commercial bodies to explore the impact of dentine sensitivity on everyday life. This research conducted along with colleagues in the Unit of Dental Public Health has resulted in a new measure of the impact of dentine sensitivity.

I am also continuing to study the sociology of the mouth in everyday life by looking at the impact of oral conditions and the experience of the mouth in the media and everyday life. This work involves the use of systems theory, consumerism and the sociology of the body.

I maintain a healthy interest in grounded theory and to this end I continue to write on the method. I like to focus on blending it with other approaches such as systems theory and critical theory and at the same time I like to clarify the original version of grounded theory.

Professor Nicholas Bishop
n.j.bishop@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism
The Medical School

Research interests

Our research aims to improve outcomes for children with inherited and acquired bone diseases and understand better the factors contributing to fracture in apparently healthy children.

We are currently conducting two studies of oral Risedronate therapy in children with Osteogenesis Imperfect (OI) and are collaborating with colleagues in Montreal to study Zoledronie acid in infants with severe OI (PI Francis Glorieux). In addition we are waiting with colleagues to study osteoporosis in children with inflammatory joint disease (POP study, PI Madeleine Rooney, Belfast) and the effects of Vitamin D supplementation in pregnancy on skeletal outcomes in infancy (MAVIDOS study, PI Cryus Cooper). We are the European centre for an open label study of recombinant bone-targeted alkaline phosphotase in severe hypophosphotasia (PI Cheryle Greenburg; funded by Enobia Pharma). Children travel from other European countries to participate in the study.

Professor Steven Julious
s.a.julious@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
Research interests
  • Clinical trials
  • Clinical trial design
  • Early phase trials
  • Non-inferiority
  • Asthma epidemiology
Professor Thomas Webb
T.Webb@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Psychology

Research interests

I am a social psychologist, interested in self-regulation and behaviour change. Specifically, I am interested in how people achieve their goals and make changes to their behaviour.

The usual answer is that people need to be motivated. However, even medium-to-large changes in people's intentions seem to have only a small-to-medium effect on their behavior. In short, motivation is not enough. As a result, much of my research to date has investigated how the effects of motivation can be boosted by forming specific plans - known as "implementation intentions" - that links good opportunities to act with suitable responses to those opportunities.

Dr Michaela Rogers
m.rogers@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Primarily I am a qualitative researcher with an interest in narrative but I have experience of managing mixed methods projects too. I am interested in all things that concern equality and social justice in relation to my practice discipline of social work and social care, but my main research interests and research lie in the following areas:

  • interpersonal and gender-based violence (including intimate partner violence, elder abuse, domestic homicide, child abuse, and other forms of family violence);
  • gender, trans and gender diversity;
  • hidden voices and marginalised communities;
  • narrative methods.

I am also interested in, and would welcome applications, concerning:

  • Identity and belonging;
  • A sociology of family, family practices and identity;
  • Hate crime;
  • Stalking and harassment;
  • Digital methods, abuse, stalking and harassment;
Professor Arne Hole
a.r.hole@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Economics

Research interests

Arne´s research interests lie in the area of applied microeconometrics, focusing on health and labour economics. He has a particular interest in stated preference methods and the econometric analysis of discrete choice data. He also has an interest in statistical programming and has written several modules for the statistical software package Stata. He has been in involved in research projects funded by the UK Medical Research Council and the Research Council of Norway, among others. Arne is interested in supervising PhD students in applied microeconometrics.

Professor Tamara Hervey
law@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Law

Research Interests

My main research interests are in the field of European Union social and constitutional law, in particular its application in health fields, social security and welfare, and non-discrimination. I have published on the European Union's competence in social fields, especially health law; on the regulation of tobacco in the EU context; on European public health law and policy; on the governance of stem cell research in the EU; on EU non-discrimination law and minority rights; and on the 'right to health' in European contexts. I am interested in socio-legal theory and method, in particular as applied to the law of the European Union.

Member of the Health Law and Policy Research Centre, Centre for the Study of Law in Society, Sheffield Centre for International and European Law and Sheffield Institute of Biotechnology Law and Ethics.

Areas of Supervision

  • European Union Law
  • Health Law and policy in trans-national contexts
  • Discrimination Law and social rights
Professor Elizabeth Cross
e.j.cross@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

Elizabeth’s main research interests are in the field of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM), specifically vibration based SHM, which uses monitored dynamic properties of a structure for condition assessment and damage detection. SHM is still a relatively young field and so much of the research that goes on is confined to the laboratory. While it is true that research into SHM is becoming increasingly popular, it has failed, so far, to be taken up in any major way by industry, despite the obvious economic and safety benefits it could offer.

Elizabeth’s current research is broadly concerned with how SHM can be made to work for the real world and encompasses the application of statistics and machine learning technology, as well as mathematics from other disciplines such as econometrics.

Mr Joseph Smeeton
j.smeeton@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

My research focuses on the practice of social work with children and their families especially in the problematic arenas of child protection or court work. I am particularly interested in practice with looked after children and adoption practice. I have a strong leaning towards trying to understand social work as experienced by service users and especially by birth parents and the philosophical and ethical underpinnings of practice in this area. Much of my recent published work draws on phenomenology to examine issues like risk, embodied practice and the social work knowledge base.

I welcome applications to study for MPhil or PhD research degrees with me, either full or part-time, in any of the following areas linked to my research interests and I am always interested in considering new topics:

  • Adoption
  • Social Work in the family court
  • Looked after children
  • Residential care for children & young people
  • Birth parent perspectives
  • Social Work ethics
  • Social Work theory
  • Philosophy of social work
  • Praxis
  • Risk
  • Phenomenology
  • Qualitative research methods
Professor Nicholas Fox
n.j.fox@sheffield.ac.uk

School of Health and Related Research

Broad Area of Research Interest:

  • Sociology of Health and Illness
  • Sexualities
  • Environment
  • Embodiment

 Research Methods I can Supervise:

  • Qualitative
  • Materialist

Specific Areas of Research Interest:

  • New materialism
  • Creativity
  • Environment
  • Sexuality
  • Health
Mrs Michaela Senek
m.senek@sheffield.ac.uk

Nursing and Midwifery
I am a mixed-methods researcher interested in supervising projects related to health services improvement  (both focusing on workforce and patient outcome issues). 
Dr Helen Quirk
h.quirk@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
I am interested in supervising Research Students in topics/areas such as:
  • community-based physical activity promotion and/or associated health inequalities
  • physical activity for people living with long-term health conditions
  • physical activity among children and young people
  • research exploring the public health potential of parkrun
Research methods I can supervise:
  • qualitative methods
  • mixed methods
  • evaluation 
Professor Sarah Salway
s.salway@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Broad area of research interest: 

  • Health inequalities
  • Gender
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Poverty
  • Reproductive health
  • Work and health
  • South Asia

Research methods I am able to supervise:

  • Qualitative
  • Quantitative or mixed methods
  • Participatory and inclusive research approaches

Specific areas of interest:

  • UK South Asian populations
  • Intersecting inequalities
  • Complex interventions
  • Knowledge translation
Professor Sarah Salway
s.salway@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Broad area of research interest: 

  • Health inequalities
  • Gender
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Poverty
  • Reproductive health
  • Work and health
  • South Asia

Research methods I am able to supervise:

  • Qualitative
  • Quantitative or mixed methods
  • Participatory and inclusive research approaches

Specific areas of interest:

  • UK South Asian populations
  • Intersecting inequalities
  • Complex interventions
  • Knowledge translation
Dr Richard Cooper
richard.cooper@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research
The Medical School
Department of Sociological Studies
 
Research interests
  • Pharmacy
  • Non-medical prescribing
  • Addiction
  • Empirical and normative ethics in healthcare 
  • Medicine supply (prescribed and over the counter) and misuse/abuse (over the counter, illicit)
  • Medical sociology
  • Public Health

Methods

  • Qualitative (interviews, observation, ethnography, content analysis, narrative)
  • Mixed methods (questionnaires, secondary data analysis)
Professor Virginia Stovin
v.stovin@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

Research interests

My current research focuses on Urban Stormwater Management and Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS). I am specifically interested in the hydrological performance of SuDS and on strategic SuDS retrofitting. My work is aimed at understanding the processes that control the quantity and quality of urban runoff in order to develop fit-for-purpose models of those processes and generate novel strategies to enable stormwater to be managed more effectively/sustainably. The work embraces fundamental science (hydrology, hydrodynamics, soil science), and has strong practical relevance. I have a track record of monitoring and modelling green roof hydrological performace, with current projects focusing on bioretention cell design, dual-function rainwater harvesting systems and evapotranspiration rates from urban vegetation.

Other ongoing work focuses on the use of computational fluid dynamics to optimise the design of combined sewer overflows and other sewer ancillary structures. This requires both the flow field and pollutant transport (sediment or solute) to be accurately modelled, in three-dimensions and in response to time-dependent inputs. Recent work aimed to understand and model the effects of vegetation on flow and solute transport in vegetated stormwater ponds.

Dr Janine Owens
jan.owens@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Research interests

My research interests fall into four areas; disability and marginalised groups, embodiment and experiences of oral health, health promotion, and cultural beliefs and practices related to health.  I work across-disciplines bringing in disability studies, psychology, political theory and sociology to dentistry.

I am a member of the British Society of Disability and Oral Health Teacher's Group which seeks to expand teaching and knowledge of disability within undergraduate and postgraduate curricula. It also contributes to policy for children and adults with disabilities.

My main areas of expertise are disability studies, qualitative research and its related methods and methodologies. My aim is to promote inclusion in research so we are working with people, not researching on them.  One example is co-production and the benefits of working directly with community groups such as people with learning disabilities and/or parents and children. Another example is using narrative to release the voices of people who may be unable to verbalise. 

Dr Efpraxia Zamani
e.zamani@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Information School

Research interests

My broad research interests relate to the organizational and social aspects of information systems. I am particularly interested in post-adoption user behaviour, enterprise information systems and ICT4D. For my PhD, I have looked into user sensemaking with portable IT artefacts, such as tablets. More specifically, I have looked into episodes of disillusionment, and how users develop their own accommodating practices for the purposes of appropriating an IT artefact. My research work has been presented in numerous conferences and has been published in journals such as the Journal of Information Technology, Government Information Quarterly and the International Journal of Electronic Commerce.

Research supervision

I am interested in supervising PhD projects that relate to the appropriation of information systems within individual but also enterprise (work-related) contexts. I am also interested in projects that have to do with the more social aspects of technology, such as its use for the purposes of development of countries and regions (ICT4D).

Mr Chris Blackmore
C.M.Blackmore@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Broad area of research interest:

  • Mental health
  • Online learning
  • Technology (inernet, social media) 

Methods I am able to supervise:

  • Qualitative
  • Mixed Methods
  • Systematic review 

Specific areas of interest:

My main research interest is in the role of emotions in online learning, and more generally the impact of the internet on well-being. I have been involved in developing and evaluating e-learning Psychotherapy training resources across Europe. Since my doctoral research, I have become interested in the potential of learning analytics and the use of data on well-being to enhance and personalize students' learning, and the application of the same principles in analysing therapeutic interactions. I am developing an interest in narrative therapy and use of virtual reality.


Dr Sonal Choudhary
s.choudhary@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research

Sonal’s research interests are broadly in the domain of sustainable natural resource management and food security. Her research interests also include understanding the triple bottom line and incentives for businesses behind sustainable practices, particularly given the social and economic contexts, and global challenges such as climate change. She investigates how sustainability and regulatory issues affect business strategies and shape attitude towards the environment and green economy.

Although firmly based in environmental sustainability, she has active or previous collaborations with economists, social scientists, environmental scientists, geographers, planners, operations and supply chain specialists. She welcomes exploring future collaborations in the following fields:

  • Food security, Big Data and food sustainability including sustainable supply chain in agro-food industry
  • Sustainable management of businesses and natural resources including ecological economics, ecosystem services and Carbon, Nitrogen and Water footprint management
  • Business ethics and corporate social responsibilities (CSR)
  • Sustainability of SMEs including Dairy industry
  • Integrated assessment of science-business-policy collaborations
  • Business and governmental aspects of climate change
  • Applications of remote sensing & GIS in devising sustainable management strategies for low carbon futures (including green logistics and short-supply chain).

PhD Supervision

She is currently supervising two PhD students and is interested in supervising students in any area of her research interests or related themes.

Professor Fraser McLeay
fraser.mcleay@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Fraser joined Sheffield University Management School in 2018, as Professor and Chair in Marketing. Fraser has received research funding from numerous external businesses or organisations as well as research councils such as the Engineering and Physical Science Research Council (ESPRC), the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and has won prizes globally for his research and contribution to practice. In 2017, he was awarded the prestigious Emerald Citations of Excellence Award for an article on electronic word of mouth. Fraser’s research is habitually interdisciplinary; with his current focus on sustainability, hedonic consumption, digital marketing, branding, entrepreneurship and co-creativity. He has recently been chair of the prestigious Academy of Marketing annual conference and co-chair the Global Branding conference held at Newcastle in 2018. Prior to joining Sheffield University Management School Fraser was Professor of Strategic Marketing Management at Newcastle Business School and also held roles as Associate Pro Vice Chancellor of Strategic Planning and Engagement, Associate Dean of Business and Engagement and Head of Corporate Development for the Faculty of Business and Law at the Faculty of Business and Law.

Fraser also has over ten years of practitioner experience, holding senior management and leadership positions globally. While working in industry, Fraser has assisted over 250 businesses in more than 60 countries to implement successful start-up, commercialisation, business expansion, marketing, branding, strategic planning and new product/service introduction strategies in industry sectors that vary from education to renewable energy, engineering, agri-food and graphene. His clients range from SMEs to MNEs and have included Nestlé, Royal Numico, Parker, Thomas Swan, Bank of Montana, Sage, UKTI, Nexus and Greggs, plus organisations such as the World Bank, USDA, and EU. Fraser has also held academic positions at Lincoln University (New Zealand); Newcastle University (UK); Northumbria University (UK), Macquarie University (Australia) the University of Montana (US), and Peter the Great St Petersburg University (Russia).

Mr Phil Joddrell
p.joddrell@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My primary research interest is focused on improving the quality of life for people diagnosed with dementia using everyday technologies. I specialise in using innovative methods to involve people in research for whom self-report may not always be possible. My PhD was titled: Investigating the potential of touchscreen technology to create opportunities for independent activity with people living with dementia.

I am broadly interested in the health and wellbeing of older adults including (but not limited to) the use of technology to achieve this.

I have a psychology background and spent 6 years working with older adults with dementia and mental health problems in a hospital environment.

Dr Graeme Manson
Graeme.Manson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

The main concern of Dr Manson´s research has been, throughout, the development of robust structural health monitoring strategies for the purposes of damage identification. Over the years, this has taken on various approaches beginning with the examination of the response of nonlinear mechanical systems before moving into the fields of signal processing, pattern recognition, machine learning and multivariate statistics for damage identification. More recently, with the questions of damage prognosis and robustness of structural health monitoring systems, the research has led toward the investigation of the propagation of uncertainty through systems and structures.

Dr Laura Sbaffi
Laura.Sbaffi@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Information School

Research interests

My research interests focus on:

  • Trust formation in health online information
  • Information needs of healthcare professionals
  • Online information needs of men and women in different contexts (e.g. e-commerce, health, finance, holidays, etc.)
  • Non-compliancy issues in relation to chronic conditions (e.g. why people tend to not use medications as prescribed)
  • How to understand and meet the needs of dementia patients’ cares
  • How to understand and meet the needs of Alzheimer’s patients’ cares

I would be interested in supervising PhD students in any of the above areas.

Professor David Edwards
david.edwards@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Animal and Plant Sciences

My research focuses on understanding the impacts of land-use change on tropical biodiversity. I am particularly interested in understanding the most effective ways of
managing tropical landscapes for biodiversity protection and the mechanisms that can be used to fund protection, although I have a range of interests, including;

  • Impacts of logging management on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning.
  • Tropical agriculture and sustainability.
  • The interaction between climate change and land-use change on extinction risk.
  • Cost-effective conservation within the tropics.
  • Policy drivers of tropical forest protection, including REDD+ and sustainability labeling.
  • Mechanisms of maintenance in mutualism.
Dr Elisabeth Garratt
elisabeth.garratt@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield Methods Institute

Beth joined the Sheffield Methods Institute as a Lecturer in Quantitative Methods in September 2019. Before this, she was a Research Fellow at the Centre for Social Investigation, Nuffield College, Oxford. She completed her PhD in Social Statistics at the University of Manchester in 2015, exploring the role of income on mental health in 3-12 year-old British children and their parents. Her research focusses on mental health in adults and children, poverty, food poverty, and homelessness.

She is a strong believer in engaging with non-academic audiences, and to this end has spoken about food insecurity on TV and radio. Her research on UK food insecurity has received widespread press coverage, been cited in government debates and was also made into an impact film.


Beth's personal blog can be found here.

Professor Tom Billington
t.billington@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Tom is an educational and child psychologist, researcher and teacher.  Tom’s interests focus on young people’s emotional well being and mental health, specifically critical approaches to child development including attachment, autism, child safeguarding and neuroscience in education.  Tom has supervised to completion over 60 personal Doctoral students in Psychology and Education, UK and international.

Ms Fiona Campbell
f.campbell@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My research interests are:

  • Use of evidence to support decision making
  • Incorporating non-RCT evidence in systematic reviews
  • Assessment of patient reported outcomines in clinical trials and methods of synthesis
  • Methods of synthesising qualitative and quantitative reviews
  • Use of expert opinion in systematic reviews
  • Any issues relating to improving health in low and middle income countries
Dr Antony Williams
Anthony.Williams@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Tony's research interests are focused in areas of critical psychology and psychoanalytic concepts and theory. To date his research has focused on contributing to the concept of a critical educational psychology. Related areas of interest include group dynamics, conceptions of mental health and emotional wellbeing, case study research and the use of reflexive and interpretative research methods.

Dr Liz Croot
l.croot@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My research interests are:

  • Access to and provision of equitable services for individuals from marginalised groups
  • Learning disabilities
  • Health behaviour particularly weight management
  • Qualitative methods
  • Narrative research
  • Cross lanaguage qualitative research
  • Realist synthesis
  • Complex intervention development and evaluation
Professor Merlyne De Souza
m.desouza@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering
Research interests:


  • GaN: CMOS, heterogenous Integration, on-chip inductors/magnetic materials for Power Management Integrated Circuits and power devices.
  • Sensors and actuators for health applications.
  • Memory devices for neuromorphic applications.
  • RF Power Amplifiers.
  • Perovskite solar cells.
Dr Praveen Thokala
P.Thokala@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My research interests are:

  • Healthcare modelling
  • Health economics
  • Multi-criteria decision analysis
  • Optimisation
Dr Paul Brindley
p.brindley@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of Landscape Architecture

Paul is currently Co-Investigator on the NERC-funded IWUN project, heading up Work Package 1 on the geography of the natural environment, socio-economic deprivation and health inequalities in Sheffield. Paul has over fifteen years’ experience of spatial data analysis and has worked on over fifty research projects including the official Rural-Urban Definitions for England and Wales (Client: Defra, ONS, DCLG, Welsh Assembly). His research interests centre on the socio-economic applications of Geographic Information Science (GIS). In particular, his work explores the importance of scale within data analysis and the generation of vague geographic places.

Dr Robert Pryce
r.e.pryce@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

I am broadly interested in all areas of economics of health, but especially the economics of "sin" behaviours such as alcohol, tobacco, drugs and gambling. I am also interested in the economics of food. I am currently involved in several different topics within the Sheffield Alcohol Research Group including work on alcohol dependence, local alcohol consumption estimates, joint modelling of tobacco and alcohol demand, and modelling of price policies.

 

I am also more generally interested in wellbeing work, especially work combining this with "sin" behaviours. Previous work includes looking at the monetary cost of problem gambling on wellbeing. I have also supervised an MSc dissertation looking at smoking and wellbeing.

Dr Daniel Holman
daniel.holman@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

My research centres on social science and perspectives on health and illness, especially with respect to health inequalities and ageing. My work sits at the interface of sociology, social policy and public health.  I have particular interests in intersectionality, biomarker analysis, chronic disease/multimorbidity, social determinants of health, the life course, and extending working lives. I have methodological expertise in the analysis of survey data, including the use of multilevel models and panel data methods.  I am interested in supervising PhD students working on the above topics.

Dr Robert Barthorpe
r.j.barthorpe@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

Dr Barthorpe's research covers a range of problems in the field of structural dynamics and beyond, with an underlying theme being the integration of numerical modelling and experimental data. Structural health monitoring is one of his major research themes. The broad aim of an SHM system is to be able to identify, at an early stage, occurrences of damage that may ultimately lead to the failure of the component or system being monitored.

Established approaches to this task typically fall into one of two categories: they are either based entirely on experimental data, or make use of a numerical model that is periodically updated as new data becomes available. Both of these approaches have distinct drawbacks: for the former, lack of appropriate experimental data is the major issue; for the latter, model-form uncertainty is among the challenges faced.

Part of Rob's work is in investigating ways to circumvent the lack of data problem through novel experimental and data-modelling techniques. A larger part is in developing new methods for integrating experimental and numerical methods, such that uncertainty in both the experimental measurements and the numerical model may be accounted for.

These methods are being developed for application to aerospace structures, wind turbines and civil infrastructure. However, the domain of applicability is much broader as the issues of handling uncertainty, solving inverse problems and overcoming test-model discrepancy are pervasive in many branches of science and engineering. Applications being investigated include the energy performance of buildings and the modelling of human bones.

Professor Karina Nielsen
K.m.nielsen@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Karina is an experienced PhD supervisor, she has supervised students in different countries in the areas of work and wellbeing, organizational interventions and return to work. 

She is interested in supervising projects on:

Bottom-up job design, including how employees can shape their own work environment to create an environment that allows them to thrive at work and perform well.

Organizational interventions involve making changes to the way work is organized, designed and managed to improve employee wellbeing. Of particular interest is how we can design and implement such interventions through creating collaborative networks between managers and employees. Understanding the process of implementing change also requires sophisticated evaluation methods that allow us to develop our understanding of what works for whom in which circumstances. 

Also projects of interest are how we can help employees with clients money mental health problems return to work and stay at work. 

Karina also has an interest in leadership and wellbeing. This includes understanding the role of line managers in ensuring a good working environment for their employees and the impact of these on employee wellbeing. Projects relating the leadership training and evaluation are particularly welcome  as are projects exploring the dark side of leadership.

Finally, projects on the impact of organizational restructuring and wellbeing and how organisations can implement change that also consider the process of change are welcome. 

Professor Nicolas Martin
n.martin@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Synthesis and application of nano-particulate materials for dental applications.

The application of nucleating agents for the remineralisation of dentine

Integrity of structurally compromised restored teeth as compound systems

Optimisation of ceramic crown-tooth compound systems

Development and characterisation of novel restorative systems.

Remote digital communication for the provision of health care in dentistry

Development of L&T in restorative dentistry

Clinical evaluation of restorative systems

Dr Joanne Thompson
j.thompson1@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Academic Unit of Medical Education

My current research is focused around the Social Accountability of Medical Schools, the impact on medical students and community organisations working in partnership with the university. This involves supporting students to become more aware of health inequity and social determinants of health and the broader implications for society.


My background is in academic psychology and counselling and I have a longstanding interest in the psychosocial impact of illness, in particular in relation to cancer survivorship and the management of children with long term conditions

Professor Richard Ross
r.j.ross@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism

Research Interests

The focus of both my clinical and basic research is on optimising pituitary hormone replacement. My group have identified and characterised uncommon mutations in the growth hormone receptor which have led to fundamental observations on the mechanism by which the growth hormone receptor signals through a pre-formed dimer. This work has led to a greater understanding of the regulation of growth hormone secretion and recently the group have developed a long acting form of growth hormone which has exceptional pharmacokinetic properties that means administration may only be required once a fortnight or once a month. This work was published in Nature Medicine in 2007.

The Clinical Research Programme has been investigating different regimens for replacing cortisol, testosterone and oestrogen in hypopituitary, hypogonadal and adrenal insufficient patients. The group have designed a new modified release form of hydrocortisone, Chronocort, which in phase 1 studies has proven to replicate the normal circadian rhythm of cortisol. This work is currently being taken through to phase 2 studies in congenital adrenal hyperplasia patients. Other work has examined the incidence of hypogonadism in cancer survivors and optimising oestrogen replacement in young women of fertile years.

I co-chair the Endocrine Unit Management Team which consists of 6 Consultant Endocrinologists and runs a number of unique and innovative specialist clinics in the Health Care Trust including: Pituitary Clinic, Transition Clinic for Paediatric Endocrinology, Late Effects Clinic for Cancer survivors, Joint Surgical Endocrine Clinics, Obesity Clinic, Genetic Endocrine Clinic and a Pituitary Multidisciplinary Team.

Publications and Patents: 234 publications during career, 34 publications in the last 5 years, Scopus h-index of 34, 7 papers cited over 100 times, 2 over 200 times and 1 over 300 times.  35 patents granted from 7 independent patent families.

  1. Patent granted 2010: C Strasburger, M Bidlingmaier, Z Wu, G Matarese, R Ross. Leptin antagonist and method for quantitative measurement of leptin. US 7,807,154 B2
  2. Patent granted 2012: R Ross, P Artymiuk, J Sayers.  Fusion protein compromising growth hormone and growth hormone receptor. US 8,173,782 B2
Miss Diana Papaioannou
d.papaioannou@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

My research interests are in the following areas:

• Clinical trial design
• Systematic reviews
• Controlled clinical trials
• Validity and responsiveness of generic quality of life measures, particularly in mental health

Professor John Holmes
john.holmes@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

My research focuses on alcohol and public health.  I have particular interests in trends and patterns in alcohol consumption, alcohol policy analysis, and the relationship between alcohol use and other health-related behaviours.  Recent projects focus on alcohol pricing, trends in drinking occasions, cultures and practices, youth drinking trends, the development and evaluation of drinking guidelines, and the equity implications of alcohol policy. 

I would be interested in supervising doctoral research related to any of the topics above using quantitative or mixed methods.  

Mrs Elizabeth Taylor Buck
e.taylor-buck@sheffield.ac.uk

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

My research interests are in child and adolescent mental health and interventions that focus on the relationship between child and caregiver. In 2009 I was awarded an NIHR Clinical Doctoral Research Fellowship. I used a mixed methods design to create an online manual of dyadic art therapy.

Research Methods I can Supervise

  • Mixed Methods
  • Manual Development

Specific Areas of Interest

  • Child and adolescent mental health
  • Parent-child interventions
  • Parenting interventions
  • Early years 
  • Art therapy
Dr Peter Dodd
p.j.dodd@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

  • Infectious disease modelling.
  • Epidemiology
  • Burden estimation
  • TB, particularly in settings with high-HIV prevalence, and population-level TB interventions.
  • TB in children.
  • Individual-based modelling methodologies.
  • Methods for model calibration and uncertainty analysis
  • Cost-effectiveness modelling
  • Global health
Dr Nasrin Nasr
N.Nasr@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My research experience and interests are:
• Interdisciplinary research
• Qualitative research particularly Narrative inquiry
• Using Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs)
• Examining Response Shift theory in the measurement of change
• User-centred design methods and experience-based approach
• Evaluating complex health interventions

Dr Philip Powell


School of Health and Related Research

Philip is a Chartered Psychologist and Research Fellow at the School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR). He has a background in Psychology and Economics and is a mixed-methods researcher, with significant expertise in quantitative survey, qualitative and experimental research methods.

Philip’s research interests include:  

  • Measuring and valuing quality of life (QoL) and psychological wellbeing in different health conditions, including in children and rare diseases.
  • The development, evaluation, and modification of patient reported outcome measures.
  • Normative and ethical issues in the valuation of health states.
  • The role of emotions and emotion regulation in health and related decision-making.
  • The effect of digital technologies, such as social media, on wellbeing.

Philip is available to supervise students in these and related areas.

Dr Saurabh Mishra
s.mishra@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of History

Research interests

Saurabh's interests lie in exploring a range of themes connected with the social history of colonial and post-colonial South Asia. More specifically, his focus areas till now have included the following: the history of science and medicine in the subcontinent, the nature of Islam in South Asia, the history of agrarian processes and structures, and the formation of colonial policies and ideologies. He is currently working on a project on indentured labour in British Guiana which investigates the lives and experiences of indentured labourers through the lens of medical/health issues. While the plantation economy has been studied by a number of historians, this project adopts a different perspective by focusing on the medical regime that labourers were subjected to.

Dr Shannon Li
xinshan.li@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering
Dr Li's research interest is in the human musculoskeletal system, particularly on personalised finite element modelling of bones and skeletal muscles. Dr Li is particularly interested in applying these modelling methods to study a range of clinical problem, from bone fracture to improvements on female health. Dr Li is currently creating a database for bone strength in young children, in order to create a tool for the diagnosis of unexplained fracture in children. She is collaborating with Sheffiled and Germany to improve women's health using computational modelling. Dr Li is also interested in the biomechanics of skeletal muscles to understand the healthy and diseased states.

Research keywords
  • Biomechanics of bones and skeletal muscles
  • Nonlinear finite element analysis
  • Organ-level modelling of the musculoskeletal system
  • Continuum mechanics
Professor Tracey Young
t.a.young@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My research interests are:

  • Methods for measuring uncertainty in economic evaluations
  • Methods for developing preference-based measures from existing QOL measures
  • Economic evaluations alongside clinical trials
  • Censored costs
  • Mapping
Dr Andrew Bell
andrew.j.d.bell@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield Methods Institute

Before moving to Sheffield, Andy was a lecturer at the University of Bristol, where he also completed his undergraduate degree (in Geography) and PhD (in Advanced Quantitative Methods). His current substantive research focuses on mental health from a life course perspective, but also spans a diverse range of other subject areas, including geography, political science, social epidemiology and economics. Methodologically, Andy’s interests are in the development and application of multilevel models, with work focusing on age-period-cohort analysis and fixed and random effects models

Dr Daniel Hammett
D.Hammett@Sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Geography

Research interests

My research addresses concerns within political and development geography, primarily in relation to sub-Saharan Africa. My work falls into two main themes: geographies of citizenship and belonging, and the geopolitics of sub-Saharan Africa. Within this work I engage with the role of media and ICTs in citizenship, development and representation, as well as identity and nationhood.

Recent and current PhD students have worked on citizenship claims in Mexico, the role of civil society in the Caribbean, pastoral livelihoods in the Horn of Africa, indigenous land rights in Canada, and health care provision in Nigeria.  


Dr Chris Millard
c.millard@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of History

Research interests

Chris is currently writing a history of illness deception in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries: Munchausen Syndromes and Modern Medicine. This book charts the chronic faking of illness (Munchausen syndrome), deliberately making one's children ill (Munchausen syndrome by proxy), and faking illness online (Munchausen by internet). These linked categories are related to diverse concerns in Britain, such as the expanding welfare state and National Health Service, the 'rediscovery' of child abuse in the 1960s and 1970s, and the anxiety created by online anonymity. More generally, Chris is interested in the ways in which modern medicine and psychiatry influence and inform our everyday lives, from assumptions about who we are, the advice we are given, and the services provided for us. This involves research in the history of the emotions, the history of anthropology and sociology, and the history of psychiatry, psychology, social work and medicine.

He is happy to supervise anyone interested in medicine, psychiatry, psychology, patient activism, social work, child guidance, the emotions, gender roles, the welfare state, the National Health Service and child abuse in twentieth- century Britain.

Professor Syed Hussain
syed.hussain@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism

My major areas of interest are management of urological cancers, clinical trials, early drug development and translational medicine. I have set up a large number of clinical trials from early phase to late phase studies during my career. My work on organ preservation in bladder cancer moved all the way from an early phase I study (Hussain et al Annals of Oncology 2001), to phase II efficacy study (Hussain et al BJC 2004) that led to a Cancer Research UK funded study BC2001 trial that was reported in New England Journal of Medicine (James, Hussain, Hall et al April 2012). This study has now changed the standard of care for patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer opting for organ preservation treatment.

Professor Richard Phillips
R.Phillips@Sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Geography

Research interests

The World after Empire: themes include Muslim geographies and postcolonial cities 
Two generations after it was broken up, the British Empire lives on in a number of ways, including through communities that trace their heritage and origins to former colonies, and in cities, born of empire, that are forced to redefine themselves for new times. I have investigated these issues through research involving British Muslims and members of the Liverpool-born black community (see Muslim Spaces of Hope, published in 2009, and Liverpool ’81: Remembering the Riots2011). I have also researched the ways in which empire is invoked in contemporary political action, through a project on anti-imperialism in the UK anti-war movements (which protested intervention in Afghanistan and Iraq). I have also investigated the historical geographies of the British Empire through studies of colonial travel and adventure literature (Mapping Men and Empire: A Geography of Adventure, 1997) and through an historical geography of sexuality politics in the British Empire (Sex, Politics and Empire: A Postcolonial Geography, 2006).

Sexuality, Space and Power: constructions and contestations of sexual identities 
Sexuality is an important vehicle for constructing and contesting power relations between national, cultural and religious groups. I have traced imperial sexuality politics through key sites within the British Empire, investigating the legacies of these colonial histories and geographies in ex-colonies including Jamaica and Sierra Leone. I have also begun to examine these dynamics within Europe, investigating cultural practices through which Muslims are constructed as 'non-liberal' minorities, through representations of forced marriage and homophobia. My books about sexuality investigate the contested regulation of sexuality in the British Empire (Sex, Politics and Empire: A Postcolonial Geography, 2006), examine sexuality politics and identities outside the cities that dominate research on sexualities (De-Centring Sexualities, 2001), and investigate the place of sexuality within sometimes tense relationships between majority societies and cultural minorities (controversies surrounding Muslim attitudes towards marriage and homosexuality are examined in a paper published in Gender, Place and Culture, 2012).

Curiosity and Adventure: from children’s books to health and wellbeing policies
My first book, entitled Mapping Men and Empire: A Geography of Adventure (1997), investigated boys' adventure stories, tracing their significance for constructions of imperialism and masculinity. I have subsequently researched and written about adventures through a range of juvenile and adult literature, notably travel writing. My more recent work focusses upon a term closely related to adventure – curiosity – through research on ‘space for curiosity’ (the title of a paper in Progress in Human Geography, 2014) and interventions on the sometimes celebrated, sometimes embattled place of curiosity in universities (paper in Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, 2010). My interests in curiosity extend to a practical and philosophical approach to pedagogy, and a desire to better understand and encourage curiosity-driven learning among students was the motivation behind my book for students on the subject of geographical fieldwork: Fieldwork for Human Geography (2012).


Dr Nils Krone
n.krone@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism

Research interests

His main clinical interests are inborn errors of steroidogenesis, congenital adrenal hyperplasia, disorders of sex development (DSD), and PCOS; his main research interests are on inborn errors of steroid hormone biosynthesis and steroid hormone metabolism in health and disease.

Current efforts of his work concentrate on the implementation of model systems to study genetic variants and the integration of diagnostic methods in adrenal disease and DSD. His group has implemented various in vitro assays to study enzymatic defects in steroidogenesis. The most recent work of his group explores the consequences of disrupted steroid hormone synthesis and action on whole organism employing zebrafish as a model organism in translational steroid hormone research (Endocrinology 2013; Endocrinology 2016). This research is based at the Bateson Centre.

The main focus of this clinical research program is on CAH. He leads on a multicentre, 17 tertiary paediatric endocrine centres in the UK, NIHR RD TRC funded project to establish the evidence basis on the current health status in children and young people with congenital adrenal hyperplasia in the UK. In addition, he works on a program to improve health care deliver for children and young people with adrenal conditions and DSD.

Dr Anna Weighall

Personal Webpage

School of Education

 

Anna's research interests are broadly concerned with sleep, memory, language learning and cognitive development in neurotypical and neurodiverse populations (especially ADHD, neurofibromatosis, dyslexia and dysgraphia).  Anna applies an experimental approach to understanding factors that contribute to memory and learning, especially vocabulary learning in adults, children and those who speak English as an additional language (EAL). In addition, Anna is interested in the application of implementation science and behaviour change techniques to interventions to improve educational outcomes. She is interested in the link between physical health and cognitive performance and the extent to which the extent to which interventions to improve physical and mental health and wellbeing may also improve cognitive and educational outcomes for children, young people and their families.


Professor Jiabin Wang
j.b.wang@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering
Research interests
  • Novel linear, rotary and multi-degrees of freedom permanent magnet machines and actuators, and their industrial applications
  • High force density linear motors/actuators
  • Power dense, highly efficient machines for traction applications
  • Fault tolerant permanent magnet machines
  • Motion control and novel PWM techniques
  • Fault detection and health monitoring of electric drives
  • Control of fault-tolerant permanent magnet machines
  • Efficiency optimised control of traction motors
  • Electrical drive-trains and energy storage/management systems for electric and hybrid vehicles
  • Vehicle-to-grid interface and bidirectional chargers for electric vehicles
  • Power quality and stability of islanded power systems
Dr Nikolaos Dervilis
n.dervilis@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering
Dr Nicholas Latimer
n.latimer@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My research interests focus on economic evaluation methodology, with a particular emphasis on the incorporation of survival analysis within economic models. My doctoral and post-doctoral research has focused primarily on methods for adjusting survival estimates in the presence of treatment switching - that is, when patients in the control group of a clinical trial switch onto the experimental treatment, thus confounding estimates of the treatment effect (where the relevant question for an economic analysis is what would have happened if control group patients did not receive this experimental treatment). Adjustment methods are primarily from the causal inference literature, and I have a related interest in the use of causal inference methods to estimate comparative effectiveness from registry datasets, particularly in the area of cancer.


Dr Tessa Peasgood
t.peasgood@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My research interests are:

  • Economics of well-being and happiness
  • Investigating the determinants of subjective well-being
  • Microeconomic evaluation of longitudinal data, particularly the BHPS and Understanding Society
Dr Philip Powell
p.a.powell@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of Economics

Combining a career in psychology and economics, Philip's research interests are in understanding behaviour, well-being, and decision-making through multidisciplinary approaches. He is an expert in behavioural and experimental economics, and has particular interest in the role of emotions in decision-making and psychological well-being processes. Philip is currently Research Fellow on the “InsEAD-EX: A mobile experimental economics portal (the ‘lab-in-a-bag’)”, which seeks to develop the Department’s capacity for experimental methods and multidisciplinary collaboration.

Professor Mark Strong
m.strong@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My Research interests

I have three related research interests that fall under the general banner of Uncertainty Quantification: (1) how do we properly account for all relevant uncertainties when we build a computer model of a physical, biological or social system? (2) how do we (efficiently) compute value of information? (3) how do we work out the value of a computer model? How much should we pay to make a simple model more complex? When do we stop increasing the complexity of a model?

Jeremy OakleyJim Chilcott and I have proposed an "internal" discrepancy-based method for managing model uncertainty. See this paper in JRSS Series C, and this paper in SIAM/ASA Journal of Uncertainty Quantification. The method is discussed in more detail in my PhD thesis.

We have proposed an efficient method for computing partial EVPI. This method works for any number of parameters of interest and requires only the PSA sample. See this open access paper in Medical Decision Making. R functions to implement the method can be downloaded here. This paper uses Gaussian process-based methods that are nicely described in the  Managing Uncertainty in Complex Models (MUCM) toolkit.

The partial EVPI method extends nicely to the computation of EVSI. See here for our open access paper on the efficient computation of EVSI.

Dr Marrissa Martyn-St James
M.Martyn-StJames@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests

My research interests include:
• Systematic reviews of clinical effectiveness for healthcare interventions
• Development of methods for systematic reviewing and evidence synthesis including meta-analysis, meta-regression, individual patient data analysis and mixed-treatment comparisons/network meta-analysis
• Critical appraisal and risk of bias assessment methods for systematic reviews
• Exercise interventions for health outcomes

Professor Dilichukwu Anumba
d.o.c.anumba@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism
The Medical School

Research interests

I am Professor of Obstetrics & Gynaecology at the University of Sheffield and Consultant in Obstetrics and Maternal and Fetal Medicine at the Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. I am Training Programme Supervisor for the Maternal and Fetal Medicine subspecialty in Sheffield. I run clinical services addressing high risk pregnancies, prenatal diagnosis and therapy and prematurity prevention.

I am Principal Investigator on several Project Grants funded by the UK’s Department of Health, the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), the Medical Research Council and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), developing technologies for preterm birth risk assessment and interventions to mitigate preterm birth and other pregnancy complications.

I am Director of the NIHR Global Health Research Group on Preterm Birth Prevention and Management (PRIME) - an interdisciplinary research alliance working across UK, Africa (currently South Africa - Cape Town, Pretoria, Johannesburg; Nigeria – Kano, Benin and Ilishan), and South East Asia (currently Bangladesh and Karnataka India).

My translational research projects have attracted over £8million of grant income in the last 8 years and mainly focus on the physiology of human birth, reproductive immunology and reducing health inequalities.

I have supervised 18 PhD/MD students, and 10 Postdocs in the last 10 years amongst other. Areas in which I am able to supervise PhD/MD studentships and include:

·      Molecular biology of human parturition
·      Reproductive immunology of high-risk pregnancies and recurrent pregnancy loss
·      Global maternal and Newborn health
·      Health inequalities in maternal newborn health
·      Premature birth, still birth, pre-eclampsia, placental disorders.
·      Clinical and laboratory Maternal and Fetal Medicine

Professor Frances Cleaver
F.Cleaver@Sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Geography

My research connects three themes:

  • Institutions: developing a social science theoretical approach to understanding how institutions (particularly for natural resource management) work.
  • Water governance: scrutinising the nature of policies, how they travel and their impacts for distribution and access to water.
  • Livelihoods: understanding the gendered everyday politics of livelihoods, access to services and resources, the dynamics of inclusion and exclusion.

Working from an inter-disciplinary base in international development studies I am interested in how improved understandings of these issues can inform interventions for progressive social change.

In my work I draw on experience of jobs in planning and service delivery (for the Ministry of Health in Zimbabwe) as well as academic posts in a variety of universities (Zimbabwe, Bradford, School of Oriental and African Studies, King’s College London and the Norwegian University of Life Sciences). I joined Sheffield as Professor of Human Geography (Geographies of the Global South) in November 2015.

Dr Liz Williams
e.a.williams@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism

Research Interests

I am a UK registered nutritionist.  My primary research interests are the role of diet in the prevention of chronic disease, healthy ageing and dietary assessment methods in older adults.  I am interested in dietary strategies to improve musculoskeletal health, diet and digestive health and in technology use for supporting people to adopt healthy behaviours. I am also interested in diet and fertility.  My research methods are primarily quantitative, and I have considerable experience in conducting and supervising dietary intervention trials in adult/older adult populations. 

My recent PhD students have studied the following:
- a randomised control trial to investigate the effect of vitamin D on musculoskeletal function in post-menopausal South-Asian women
- dietary pattern analysis in people with colorectal adenoma
- vitamin D for the management of symptoms in people with irritable bowel syndrome
- complex dietary intervention (physical activity, vitamin D and protein) to prevent musculoskeletal ageing
- development of a novel method of dietary assessment in older adults
Dr Thomas Muskett
t.muskett@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Human Communication Sciences (old code)

Research interests

My work involves application of a qualitative research approach called Conversation Analysis (CA) to very closely examine video recordings of real-life interactions involving people who are described as having communication difficulties, in particular children with a diagnosis of autism.  CA provides a powerful method through which to examine interaction, as it enables socially-oriented accounts to be developed of how people's talk and other behaviour (even if apparently unusual or 'disordered') relates to what others at the scene have just said or done, or been saying or doing (see links to the right for more on CA).

The use of CA therefore allows for detailed, and often very novel, accounts to be developed on the nature of 'communication difficulties', 'social problems' and 'problematic behaviours', as it enables description of the apparent individual meanings, functions and consequences of these for the people actually in the interactions in which they occur.  I am interested in how CA accounts of communication difficulties relate to what is typically written about conditions such as autism across different disciplines, and how these might reciprocally interface with concerns in fields such as critical disability studies and the new social studies of childhood.  Along these lines, I contribute to a number of inter-disciplinary social scientific research groups within the University of Sheffield, including Disability @ UoS, and the Body, Health and Well-being Research Interest Group within the Centre for the Study of Childhood and Youth.

I also maintain a strong interest in health service research and the evaluation of complex interventions. I am particularly interested in the use of multimodal and eclectic approaches to examine the ‘value’ of interventions and/or care pathways for children and adolescents with complex needs.

Dr Thomas Darton
t.darton@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease

My research interests include:

  • Investigating the drivers of antimicrobial resistance in lower- and middle-income country settings.
  • Understanding the role and developing vaccines and diagnostics for enteric fever and other causes of non-specific febrile illness in low-resource settings.
  • The ethical use of human challenge studies to advance the discovery and translation of tools for patient benefit.
Professor Martin Foster
m.p.foster@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering

Research interests

  • Resonant power supplies
  • Piezoelectric transformers (PTs)
  • Power electronics packaging and thermal management
  • Multilevel power converters
  • Battery management technologies


Professor Janet Brown
j.e.brown@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism

As a clinician scientist, I engage in both clinical and laboratory research, which is internationally recognised, with publications in Lancet, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Nature Clinical Oncology, Clinical Cancer Research, Annals of Oncology Breast Cancer Research and Treatment and other journals. I lead the Clinical Bone Oncology and Biomarkers Group in University of Sheffield (LINK), which has a particular focus on the impact of cancer on the skeleton in patients with breast, prostate and renal cancer. Our recent research includes the use of biomarkers in established bone metastasis to aid patient management and studies of the negative impact of cancer treatments on bone health. One of the main objectives of our current clinical and laboratory work is to develop novel prognostic and predictive biomarkers for clinical use in patients with early cancer to help in prevention or delay of cancer metastasis to bone, after which disease is incurable.

I also run clinical studies to develop innovative therapeutic approaches in breast, renal and prostate cancer. As Chief Investigator, I currently lead a large UK-wide, 40 centre, clinical trial (STAR) funded by NIHR, to determine whether treatment breaks in patients with renal cancer receiving targeted therapies, can reduce toxicity and have health economic benefits, without loss in efficacy. I am also PI on a clinical study funded by Cancer Research UK aimed at evaluating a potentially exciting new form of virotherapy in patients with prostate cancer.

Dr Ziqi Zhang
ziqi.zhang@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Information School

My research interests are in the areas of Semantic Web, Natural Language Processing, Text Mining, Machine Learning and Data Science. Particularly in

- Information Extraction: how to automatically turn unstructured, natural language text into structured representation that could support machine understandability and reasoning.
- Social media analysis: the application and adaptation of Information Extraction methods onto social media text analytics.
- Lexical semantics: how to represent the ‘meaning’ of a word, name, phrase, or sentence; how to measure the relatedness and similarity of these meanings (semantic relatedness and similarity).
- Knowledge graphs: the use of all the above technology in the automatic creation, mapping, and completion of structured ‘databases’ that support machine understandability and reasoning.
- Semantic Web and Linked Data: the use of all the above technology to enable the vision of tomorrow’s Web where machine understandable data are put on the Web, shared and reused across application, enterprise, and community boundaries.

Potential topics:
Knowledge graph construction, mapping, and completion: Knowledge graphs such as Wikidata, DBpedia, and the Google Knowledge Graph are becoming the backbone that drives today's search engines. They are also used widely in a large range of applications such as recommendation and reasoning in domains such as tourism, and e-commerce. I am interested in various areas related to computation methods for knowledge graphs. This includes, but is not limited to, automated construction of knowledge graphs using Information Extraction, text mining and Natural Language Processing; the mapping of different knowledge graphs; detection of missing links in large knowledge graphs or generally, knowledge graph completion; and the use of knowledge graphs in downstream applications such as recommendation and visualisation.
Linked data on the Web: the Linked Data practice has been increasingly adopted by a significant number of content creators and is leading to the 'boom' of structured open data on the Web. As an example, the e-commerce domain has seen the embedding of structured data within product webpages, to allow search engines to better discover them, and enable intelligent applications such as product comparison services. I am interested in various areas of research related to linked data. This includes, but is not limited to, the 'cleansing' of heterogeneous linked data; the use of linked data to enable downstream, intelligent applications; and the use of linked data to drive data mining processes such as Information Extraction and Integration.
Social media - combating toxic content using computational methods: social media such as Twitter is increasingly exploited for the propagation of toxic content such as hate speech and extremism and the organisation of related activities. Implementing effective counter measures depends on the real-time understanding of such content, i.e., automated detection of the emergence and spread of the content, and semantic content analysis. I am interested in developing novel data mining and machine learning methods that can support the automatic identification, analysis and tracking of toxic content on social media.
Social media - data mining in the context of health informatics: social media is playing an important role in the generation and sharing of health information, as studies have shown that a substantial and increasing percentage of the population is seeking and following health advice found on SMS. I am interested in developing data mining methods that can automatically retrieve and analyse such information from social media to understand the nature of such information, and their impact on personal health management. For example, what kinds of health related information are shared, and how much are considered useful by information seekers.

Professor Mahdi Mahfouf
m.mahfouf@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering

Research interests:

Intelligent Systems Based Signal Processing, Modelling and Control in Biomedicine

  • Neural-Fuzzy Modelling and Decision Support in Respiratory Intensive Care Units (ICU) and Cardiac Intensive Care Units (CICU).
  • Signal Processing and Physiological Modelling for Operational Functional State (OFS) Identification in Humans: Investigations into Man-Machine Interactions.
  • Model-Based Predictive Control of Anaesthesia.
  • Fuzzy and Neural-Fuzzy Classification, Modelling and Control of Anaesthesia.

A Systems Engineering Approach to Modelling and Optimisation for Metal Processing

Professor Tony Ryan
t.ryan@sheffield.ac.uk

Nursing and Midwifery

Research interests

I undertake research and teaching activities in the field of long-term conditions and ageing. Specifically I work in the fields of dementia care and family caregiving. In particular I am keen to continue these activities in the context of applied, translational research.

Professor Lee Ford
l.ford@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering

Research interests

  • Adaptive materials and structures for microwave absorbers
  • Reconfigurable frequency selective surfaces
  • Novel radar absorbing material (RAM) design
  • Radar Cross-section management
  • Electromagnetic material characterisation


Professor Daniel Gladwin
d.gladwin@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering

Research interests

  • Control – power systems
  • Power electronics
  • Embedded systems
  • Energy storage and management
  • Intelligent systems
  • Telematics
  • Optimisation and Modelling
  • Evolutionary computing


Professor Stephen Pinfield
s.pinfield@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Information School

Research interests

My research interests focus on:

  • Open access
  • Open data
  • Scholarly communication
  • Research publishing
  • Research data management
  • Academic libraries
  • Digital libraries
  • Library strategy and policy
Dr John Richmond
j.g.richmond@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

I am interested in supervising PhD Students in areas such as:
• Patient Safety
• Risk Management
• Quality Improvement, including Continuous Improvement (e.g. Lean)
• Professional Organisation in Healthcare

Professor Alan Tennant
a.tennant@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering
Research interests
  • Radar signature management
  • Active radar absorbers
  • Phase modulating microwave structures
  • Antennas
  • Phased array antennas and systems
  • Adaptive optimisation techniques
  • Acoustic arrays and imaging systems
Professor Ian Bache
i.bache@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Politics and International Relations
Research interests
  • The politics of wellbeing/ quality of life and related topics (eg health, mental health, social exclusion, social class and inequality)
  • Governance and public policy
  • Multi-level governance
  • Europeanization
Dr Manoj Menon
m.menon@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Geography

Research areas and interests

My research group investigates a wide variety of topics related to environmental soil science and management. This includes soil physics and hydrology, soil structure development, soil - biotic interactions and soil threats (compaction, pollution and flooding). 
We also study environmental impacts of soil management such as conservation tillage practices and organic amendments. We also use high-resolution imaging techniques and modelling (at different spatial scales) tools to understand soil processes.

See more at http://drmenon.staff.shef.ac.uk/index.html

Dr Andrew Cox
a.m.cox@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Information School

Research interests

My research interests focus on a number of areas:

  • Online community and communities of practice
  • Everyday and leisure-related information practices
  • The development of the LIS profession
  • Research data management
Research supervision

Some topics I am particularly interested in supervising PhD work related to those themes:

  • Virtual ethnographies of online communities, particularly those forming around digital photography and from the perspective of their impact on wellbeing

  • The information practices of those pursuing leisure pursuits, eg runners - including activity tracking

  • The study of researchers’ research data management, in the context of their Personal Information Management/ Personal Digital Archiving

  • The changing role of the LIS profession

  • The use of library and informal space in learning

Dr Andrew Chantry
a.d.chantry@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism

Research Interests

His principal research interests are anabolic strategies in the treatment of myeloma bone disease and novel strategies to target myeloma tumour. He also has holistic research interests including life with cancer – holistic care and quality of life studies, computational modeling of cancer including using digital simulations and game technology.

Dr Katie Ellis
k.ellis@sheffield.ac.uk

Nursing and Midwifery

I am interested in childhood and youth and in the wellbeing of children and families. I am a qualitative researcher and have focused much of my research around children and young people who are living away from their parents. My research covers sensitive topics, such as CSA, youth homelessness, foster care, child abuse and neglect. I am keen to explore the concept of resilience and champion methodologies which allow those termed as 'vulnerable' to share their experiences. 

Professor Mark Rees
m.rees@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Animal and Plant Sciences

Research interests:

  • Evolution of plant reproductive strategies - when and at what size to flower
  • Evolution of seed size and dormancy
  • Modeling management strategies for weed populations
  • Physiology and life history consequences of growth-survival trade-offs
  • Population biology of invasive plants
  • Modeling structured populations using integral projection models
Dr Aidan While
a.h.while@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Urban Studies and Planning

Research interests

Areas of interest include the governance of 'new economic spaces' (e.g. growth management in different national and regional contexts), and examining the implications of climate change and climate policy for urban and regional governance.  (e.g. the impact of the carbon calculs on policy and investment decisions).

Dr Sergej Ljubownikow
s.ljubownikow@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research

My research focuses on the broad areas of business and society and transitioning and emerging economies. In particular I focus on the activities and strategies of non-profit non-governmental organisations, the activities and strategies of firms’ vis-à-vis societal issues and related practices of strategy including corporate social responsibility.

Areas of Research Supervision

I am open to supervising PhD or postgraduate taught students in the areas of:
Non-profit organisations and social enterprises (activities and strategies in both ‘western’ and transition contexts)
Social issues in business and management (CSR, CSR practices and traditions in transition and emerging economies)
Cross-sector partnerships (strategic, management, practices issues in transition and emerging economies)

Dr Sarah Brooks
s.brooks@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Sarah joined the University of Sheffield in 2012 after being awarded a Management and Business Development fellowship jointly funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), the UK Commission for Employment and Skills (UKCES) and the Society for the Advancement of Management Studies (SAMS). The fellowship was designed to improve practitioner experience within the academic field. In December 2015, Sarah became a full-time lecturer in Organisational Behaviour with specific focus on Occupational Psychology, Human Resource Management and Leadership.
Prior to joining the University, Sarah held a number of positions in the fields of operations management and management consultancy, leading change management projects in both the private and public sector. She is currently in the fourth year of a PhD at the Institute of Work Psychology focusing on understanding the role of formality on upward challenge in the UK Police Service.

Research

Sarah’s research interests include all aspects of voice and silence and organisational communication. As a qualitative researcher, Sarah is keen to use innovative and unique methods designed to provide insight into cognitive and mental models of individual behaviour such as card sort, repertory grid and thinking aloud technique.

PhD Supervision

Sarah is interested in hearing from anyone interested in studying voice and silence or wider communication issues in the workplace.

Working with Organisations and Public Engagement

If you are interested in knowing more about the reasons why employees don’t speak up to their managers, or why managers might not encourage voice, please contact me. I am happy to run workshops designed to raise awareness of these issues. If you would like to work with me on a piece of research in your organisation, I would also be delighted to hear from you.

Publications

Brooks, S. (2014). Understanding workplace voice and silence. European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology in Practice, 6 26-38.

Full list of publications

 

Dr Abongeh Tunyi
A.Tunyi@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Abongeh Tunyi holds a B.Sc in Accounting (University of Buea), Master of Finance (MFin) with distinction (University of Glasgow), a PhD in Finance & Accounting (University of Glasgow) and a Post Graduate Certificate in Learning & Teaching in Higher Education (Liverpool Hope university). He is also a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (FHEA). Prior to Joining the Management School, Tunyi was a Lecturer in Accounting & Finance at Liverpool Hope University.

Teaching

Tunyi has previously taught modules in Corporate Finance, International Finance, Quantitative Methods, Management Accounting and Financial Management. He is currently the module leader for Issues in Finance (MGT6091). This module explores contemporary research and practice in advanced corporate finance and modern investment management. The module covers areas such as asset pricing, portfolio management, empirical methods (particularly, event prediction) in finance, behavioral finance, mergers & acquisitions, value relevance of CSR and CG strategies, and firm financing decisions.

 

Research

Corporate Finance, capital markets, mergers & acquisitions (M&A), bankruptcies, Corporate governance, Investment analysis and strategies, Corporate Finance & market-based accounting in emerging economies.

PhD Supervision

Tunyi welcomes PhD applications in all areas of his research interests.He is particularly interested in supervising projects in the areas of Mergers & Acquisitions and Corporate Finance & market-based accounting in emerging economies

Publications

Danbolt, J., Siganos, A. and Tunyi, A. (2016). Abnormal Returns form Takeover Prediction Modelling: Challenges and Suggested Investment Strategies. Journal of Business Finance and Accounting, 43(1-2) 66-97.

Tunyi, A. and Ntim, C. (2016). Location Advantage? Governance Quality, Stock Market Development and Firm Characteristics as Antecedents of African M&As. Journal of International Management, 22(2) 147-167.

Professor Gillian Hardy
g.hardy@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Psychology

Research interests

Psychological treatments for depression: psychotherapy processes and outcomes; attachment theory; interpersonal processes. Psychological health in employment.

Professor Jeremy Oakley
J.Oakley@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Probability and Statistics

Research interests

Bayesian statistics; eliciting probability distributions; medical statistics; health economics; quantifying uncertainty in complex computer models

Dr Clare Relton
C.Relton@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Broad area of research interest: 

  • Health / utopia

Research methods I am able to supervise:

  • Qualitative
  • Quantitative
  • Mixed methods

Specific areas of research interest:

  • Pragmatic trial methods
  • Homeopathy
  • Breastfeeding
  • Public health
  • Informed consent method
  • Solutions to a wide range of chronic health conditions: chronic pain, insomnia, depression, and 'disorders'

 

Dr Rachel King
rachel.king@sheffield.ac.uk

Nursing and Midwifery

I have a particular interest in researching nursing workforce issues and knowledge mobilisation. Current research includes longitudinal mixed methods cohort studies of advanced level nurse practitioners and trainee nursing associates. I am also involved in a systematic review of continuing professional development in nursing.

Methodologically my expertise lies in qualitative research (using observations, focus groups and interviews), and reviews.

I currently co-supervise two PhD students, exploring advanced nursing roles in surgery and stroke care settings, and welcome any prospective student interested in researching nursing workforce issues or aspects of knowledge mobilisation.

Dr Matthew Kurien
m.kurien@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease

My research interests are in small bowel disease and clinical nutrition, with outputs predominantly in coeliac disease and gastrostomy feeding. Other research interests include gastrointestinal bleeding, bile acid diarrhoea and irritable bowel syndrome.

In coeliac disease my work has focused on detection, using differing endoscopic techniques and point of care tests. I am now examining the autoimmune association between Coeliac disease and Type 1 Diabetes, and also investigating the overlap with non-coeliac gluten sensitivity. In gastrostomy feeding, my research has aimed at improving patient selection for this intervention. In 2016, I was awarded the Julie Wallace Award by the Nutrition Society for my contributions to this field.

Professor Alison Loescher
a.loescher@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

In 2003 I initiated a service to manage patients with chronic orofacial pain. The service is now well established and receives referrals from a wide geographic area, including many tertiary referrals. The rarer causes of facial pain are frequently seen within the clinic making it a valuable teaching clinic for both medical and dental higher surgical trainees and dental undergraduate students. In the development of the facial pain service, links have been made with colleagues in neurosurgery, neuromedicine and palliative care. Weekly clinics, held with neurosurgery, review patients with trigeminal neuralgia requiring surgical treatment. This clinical interest in facial pain forms the basis for some of the research projects that are currently being undertaken.

Miss Suzanne Paisley
s.paisley@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

I joined ScHARR Information Resources at its inception in 1994. In 2000 I was seconded to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE), as a Technical Lead in the Appraisals Team. I returned to ScHARR as Managing Director of the Technology Assessment Reviews (TARs) programme funded UK NHS HTA Programme. In 2003 I was awarded a UK Department of Health fellowship looking at the retrieval and use of evidence in decision-analytic models of cost-effectiveness.

In 2009 I became Head of the ScHARR Information Resources Group (IRG) leading the Group's research and teaching activities and managing the information service for ScHARR staff and students and for NHS staff through the Yorkshire and Humber Research Design Service (RDS).

I am Associate Director of the NICE Public Health Collaborating Centre (PHCC) at ScHARR and of the Department of Health Economic Evaluation Policy Research Unit (EEPRU) based at ScHARR and the University of York

Research Interests

Information retrieval methods and problem structuring methods to support evidence synthesis. Specific areas of interest:

  • Use of evidence in the specification and population of decision-analytic models
  • Retrieval of evidence for reviews of complex interventions

Teaching Interests

  • MSc in Health Economics and Decision Modelling (HEDM) (Research Methods unit, Joint Lead)
  • MSc in International Health Technology Assessment, Pricing and Reimbursement (iHRAPR) (proposed) (Use of Evidence in the Design and Development of Models unit, Lead)

Professional Activities

Member of:

  • Health Technology Assessment International (HTAi) Information Resources Group
  • InterTASC Information Specialists' Subgroup (ISSG)
  • Cochrane Information Retrieval Methods Group (IRMG)
  • Campbell and Cochrane Economics Methods Group (CCEMG)

Current Projects

  • Department of Health Economic Evaluation Policy Research Unit (DH EEPRU).
    Co-investigator (PI: John Brazier). Department of Health (2010-2015)
  • NICE Public Health Collaborating Centre.
    Joint PI (with Ron Akehurst, Jim Chilcott, Liddy Goyder). NICE (2008-2011, 2011-2012)
  • Angioplasty for peripheral arterial occulsive disease (PAOD): systematic review.
    Co-applicant (PI: Jonathon Michaels). NIHR HTA (2010-2011)
Dr Dragos Adascalitei
d.adascalitei@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Dragos is Lecturer in Employment Relations. He joined the Management School in September 2017. Before joining the School, he was a Postdoctoral researcher at the Central European University (CEU), Center for Policy Studies in Budapest, Hungary. He is a member of the Work, Employment Relations Research Centre (WOERRC) located within the Management School


Research

Dragos is particularly interested in studying labour market reforms and their consequences for the economy and individuals. His work combines quantitative large-n analyses with fine grained in depth comparative historical narratives. Generally, he uses both macro-level traditional institutionalist theories as well as actor-centred and behavioural approaches that take into account individual responses to policy changes. He is also interested in industrial relations and the factors that account for the trade union power at the local and national levels.


Professor Joseph Boxall
j.b.boxall@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

Research interests

Prof. Boxall´s research interests are concerned with understanding and modelling hydraulic, water quality and infrastructure performance throughout the natural and urban environment. His research interests are multi-disciplinary and have a number of cross cutting themes that include research in full-scale live systems, pilot and laboratory systems, with the application of theoretical, computational and analytical approaches, including software development. Specific themes include:

  • The monitoring, modelling, operation and management of potable water distribution systems for both quantity, with an emphasis on leakage, and quality encompassing physical, biological and chemical changes and interactions
  • The dynamics and impacts of pollutants in open channel systems
  • The hydraulic and pollution performance of urban drainage systems
  • Application of ICT for data collection from disparate urban water systems, together with computation (soft computing) techniques to turn data to information to knowledge
  • Asset management and whole life costs, including energy and carbon, associated with water distribution and sewer systems
Dr Lei Chen
l.chen@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research Interests

Lei's research interests cover a range of topics, including intangible measurement, management and disclosure, corporate social responsibility, financial institutions and financial markets. She is also interested in research methods, particularly focusing on the development of mixed methods in accounting and management research.

Areas of Research Supervision

Lei is interested in supervising PhD students in the areas of financial reporting, social and environmental reporting, corporate social responsibility, and banking (with particular reference to China and other developing countries). She is also keen to supervise PhD students who conduct interdisciplinary projects using mixed methods.

 

Publications

He, L;, Chen, L; and Liu, F.H. (2017). Banking reforms, performance and risk in China. Applied Economics, 49(40) 3995-4012.

Chen, L., Danbolt, J. and Holland, J. (2014). Rethinking bank business models: the role of intangibles. Accounting, Auditing and Accountability Journal, 27(3) 563-589.

Full list of publications

Dr Penny Breeze

Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Penny is currently a research associate in ScHARR within the Health Economics and Decision Modelling Section. Penny has been at ScHARR for over 4 years, first as a PhD student and more recently working as a health economics modeller. Before working in ScHARR Penny was working as a health economics consultant at IMS Health developing cost-effectiveness models for pharmaceutical products. The subject of her thesis was to investigate the use of health economic models to develop drug development programmes for new treatments for systemic lupus erythematosus. Since working at ScHARR Penny has been working on a project funded by the School for Public Health Research (SPHR) to provide a coherent, model based framework for the evaluation of strategies for the prevention of type 2 diabetes. Penny has developed a new cost-effectiveness model to evaluate a broad range of type-2 diabetes prevention interventions in the United Kingdom. Penny's research interests are in methods for longitudinal data analysis for use in decision-analytic modelling. Specifically in complex natural history models with multiple dynamic risk factors.

Dr Chris Wood
c.wood@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of English Literature

I am interested in the many uses of the arts and popular culture, and the relationship between mental health, urban living, and politics. I think that people with mental health problems often find ways to live well and that one of the most positive developments in this field is the strength of the service user and voices movement. Collaborative approaches to mental health seem to me to offer a way forward. I have recently become a trustee of Art Refuge UK which uses art therapy in different international locations to support people (particularly young people and children facing the difficulties of migration).

Professor Richard Bentall
r.bentall@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Psychology

Psychiatric classification. Psychosis (‘schizophrenia’, ‘bipolar disorder’): the mechanisms involved in hallucinations, delusions and other symptoms. The social determinants of mental ill-health. Psychological treatments.

Dr Simon Hayes
s.a.hayes@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

Research interests

His research interests primarily concern the development of `SMART´ systems for health monitoring and mitigation in composite materials. He also has an interest in the nanomechanical testing of polymeric and other viscoelastic materials.

Ms Shijie Ren
s.ren@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research interests 

  • Bayesian statistics in clinical trials and health economics
  • Network meta-analysis
  • Extrapolate time-to-event data
  • Eliciting probability distributions
  • Value of information analysis
Dr Tim Rogers
Tim.Rogers@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Current research interests include:

  • Machine learning for structural dynamics and Structural Health Monitoring
  • Bayesian statistical modelling of structural systems
  • Probabilistic nonlinear system identification
  • Joint input/state/parameter identification
Professor Neil Bermel
n.bermel@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Russian Studies
School of Languages and Cultures

Research interests

My research explores language variation and the emergence of linguistic structure through corpora and experimental work; I also have conducted research in the areas of language planning, language management, linguistic landscapes and multilingualism. I ground my work in data from the Slavonic languages and nations, and more specifically Russian and Czech, but am also interested in supervising work on these topics that has a broader focus.

Dr Nicola Dempsey
N.Dempsey@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Landscape Architecture

Research interests

  • Place-keeping and post-occupancy evaluation of open space to examine how effectively landscapes are used in the way designers intended;
  • Decision-making in open space management and maintenance to explore who makes the decisions and on whose behalf;
  • Developing an understanding of quality in the landscape, particularly in different contexts such as India’s rapidly growing cities;
  • Measuring perceptions of the neighbourhood via mapping according to different social/ demographic characteristics.


Professor Nigel Dunnett
n.dunnett@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Landscape Architecture

Research interests

My research activity is strongly interdisciplinary, focusing on the interface between ecology, design and horticulture in urban green space and built development, and has an active interaction with industry, national agencies, and local community groups. My research falls into four major areas:. a) development of sustainable and innovative vegetation and planting design techniques; b) The vegetation, planting and ecology of green roof systems; c) Rain Gardens and other landscape rainwater management features; d) long-term ecological monitoring.

Dr Jonathan Gamu
j.k.gamu@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of Politics and International Relations

Lecturer in International Politics

 

My research scrutinizes the intersection of corporate power, market-based modes of natural resource management, and the environmental politics of violence in the global South. Specifically, I am interested in understanding how new and emerging modes of transnational environmental and conflict governance, including corporate social responsibility, supply chains, and multi-stakeholder initiatives, are affecting the dynamics of contentious resource politics in peripheral local spaces. 

Dr Robert Marchand
r.marchand@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research

My research is focused in the areas of Problem Structuring Methodologies and Behavioural Operations Management. I am interested in exploring methodological developments which allow us to understand what we don't know about a problematic situation so that we can facilitate inquiry to bring about appropriate and relevant real world changes that work. I have a particular interest in participatory methodologies for engaging stakeholders in a problematic system, to ensure a human-centred, holistic analysis and understanding can be achieved

Professor Steven Thornton
s.f.thornton@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

Research interests

Dr Thornton's research experience covers contaminant hydrogeology, with particular interests in the application and performance assessment of natural attenuation for pollution management, laboratory and field studies of biodegradation of organic contaminants in groundwater, the transport and fate of pollutants in dual porosity aquifers, geochemical reactive transport modelling, groundwater impacts from landfills, attenuation of landfill leachate in clay liners, aquifers and the design of reactive barriers for landfills, and hydrogeological processes and solute transport across the groundwater-surface water interface.

Dr Daniel Green
d.j.green@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My applied research interests are broad. I am interested in mental health; prescription trends (opioids consumption, polypharmacy, red flags); healthy aging (joint pain and functional issues, comorbidities); general health aspects (alcohol, smoking, nutrition and diet).

I am also interested in statistical methods such as regression models, survival analysis, and aspects related to the use of structural equation models (specifically latent-related analyses).

Dr Monica Hernandez
monica.hernandez@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My main research interests lie in microeconometrics, the analysis of micro level data on the economic behaviour of individuals. I am also interested in more general model and methods development to analyse individual level data showing nonstandard characteristics. Recent examples include analysis of health state utility data, health and life satisfaction, the economics of illicit behaviour, the dynamics of children developmental outcomes and applications to individuals’ decisions to participate in welfare programmes.

Professor Brendan Stone
b.stone@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of English Literature

Research interests

My research (and teaching) often involves me in working with users of mental health services. I am currently working with a range of initiatives in which service-users are supported in using creative arts and digital media to explore and communicate their experience and influence healthcare policy and practice. I am always keen to hear from individuals, groups, or organisations who want to develop similar or related work. I am a long-time mental health service-user myself, and have a strong commitment to the rights and empowerment of individuals using mental health services and/or living with mental distress. I am committed to promoting service-user led research wherever this is feasible.

Dr Navdeep Athwal
n.k.athwal@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Dr Navdeep Athwal is currently a Lecturer of Marketing at University of Sheffield Management School. To date, her research has included network development in hybrid (online and offline) settings, niche consumption communities, luxury consumption and authenticity, and the role of gender in consumer behaviour. Her research has been funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), University of Warwick, Academy of Marketing Science and the Marketing Trust.

Dr Athwal is a member of the Academy of Marketing Science, European Marketing Academy (EMAC), and a member and reviewer for the Association for Consumer Research (ACR). She has contributed to and participated in inter-disciplinary working groups such as the Leverhulme Luxury Network. Her research has been covered in media outlets such as Bloomberg Business Week and the Daily Mail. Outside of academia, she has worked and consulted across financial services, retail, government and charity sectors.

Areas of Research Supervision

Dr Athwal is currently supervising a PhD student at the University of Sheffield Management School in the field of luxury consumption and consumers from emerging markets. Prospective PhD students with similar research interests are invited to send a research proposal and a CV.

Professor Jim Haslam
j.haslam@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Jim Haslam is Professor of Accounting, Governance and Society in the Management School's Division of Accounting and Financial Management and Divisional Director of Research and Impact. He has over 30 year's experience in academia. He joined Sheffield from Newcastle University in August, 2015. Before that he has been a Professor at Waikato (New Zealand), Heriot-Watt, Dundee and Durham. Prior to this he was a lecturer at Aston, UCNW and LSE and a senior lecturer at Essex. He has a first class honours degree from Sheffield and is a chartered accountant, working in practice with Ernst and Whinney (now Ernst and Young) 1981-4. He has a wide range of teaching interests and substantial administrative experience. His research concerns the social analysis of accounting and related control practices and he is currently active in several projects in this area. His PhD on nineteenth-century legislation led to an interest in the writings on accounting of Jeremy Bentham and he has several publications thereon, as well as publications in a number of areas including accounting and finance education, accounting and culture, international accounting and politics, accountability practices and their social worth, emancipatory accounting, accounting and civil society and corporate social responsibility. He is on the editorial board of a number of international accounting journals and in 2003, with Sonja Gallhofer, published the book 'Accounting and Emancipation: Some Critical Interventions'.

Dr Denise Bee
d.bee@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Academic Unit of Medical Education

I have a number of years’ experience in undergraduate programme evaluations and management of medical assessments. Consequently these are areas I find most interesting when considering research topics.  Assessments can cover a number of formats and these begin in admissions and go all the way to Finals. I have a particular interest in the psychometrics of assessment.  Student evaluations are very important to the development of learning and teaching experiences.  I have an interest in questionnaire studies but am also fascinated by the breath of material that comes from free form collection of data in talking with students.

Professor John Henneberry
j.henneberry@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Urban Studies and Planning

Research interests

My research focuses on the structure and behaviour of the property market and its relation to the wider economy and state regulatory systems. I have developed a distinctive institutional perspective on the subject that is rooted in cultural economy. I use both qualitative and quantitative methods to explore property markets, working closely with econometric colleagues on occasion to analyse regularities in market behaviour. I have a particular interest in the way that calculative practices – such as valuation, financial appraisal and portfolio analysis and management – shape property markets and affect urban and regional development.

Dr Paula Meth
p.j.meth@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Urban Studies and Planning

Research interests

My work examines everyday lives and experiences of urban change, informal housing, housing formalisation, gender and violence (men as well as women's experiences), crime management, inequality and injustice, governance, local politics and everyday power relations, all focusing on the global South, particularly South Africa, India and other African countries. I also enjoy researching and writing about qualitative methodology.

I am currently leading a research project focussed on the everyday experiences of those who live at the peripheries of African cities.

Dr James Shucksmith
j.shucksmith@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

Research interests

Dr Shucksmith's primary research focus is the physical processes that drive water quality transformations within urban drainage and surface water environments. This includes developing techniques for understanding and mitigating the likely pressures on water management caused by climate change, population growth and asset deterioration. His work ranges from experimental based research into solute mixing processes within open channels, vegetated flows and urban flood waters to more applied work in collaboration with industry on integrated water quality modelling and real time control systems. In collaboration with colleagues James also works in fields such as eco-hydraulics, urban flooding and sustainable urban drainage systems.

Professor Malcolm Tait
m.tait@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Urban Studies and Planning

Research interests

My core research interests revolve around critical understandings of ‘everyday’ planning activity.  This involves two main strands:

  1. developing understandings of how trust, professionalism, and the public interest are interwoven through planners’ practice in a changing political context.
  2.  exploring the politics of urban design and management.

Recent funded research projects have focussed on the development of housing provision for an ageing society (DWELL). I am currently leading a project on 'Working in the Public Interest', which explores the increasing involvement of private companies in carrying out spatial planning work for local governement.

Professor Simon Tait
s.tait@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

Research interests

Simon's primary research focus is on the processes associated with erosion, transportation and deposition of sediment in river and urban drainage systems, with a strong emphasis on fundamental flow and grain processes. Linked to this theme is his work in turbulence and free surface wave dynamics associated with flows over rough, water worked sediment deposits. His secondary interests are in applying and developing improved measurement and management methodologies to allow urban water infrastructure systems to cope better with pressures caused by climate change, changing patterns of use and physical deterioration. Current work also includes the study of energy use and recovery in urban water systems.

Professor Neil Hyatt
n.c.hyatt@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

Research interests

Radioactive waste management and disposal.
Our focus is on developing strategy, materials, processes and policy to support the safe, timely and efficient clean up of the UK radioactive waste legacy. A key aspect of our research is the design, manufacture and performance assessment of glass and ceramic materials for the immobilisation of plutonium residues, legacy intermediate level wastes, and high level wastes from reprocessing operations. We work closely with industrial organisations, including Sellafield Ltd., the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and National Nuclear Laboratory to address real world challenges of radioactive waste management. Our work has supported development of thermal treatment strategy by Sellafield Ltd. and Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and the acceptance of vitrified intermediate level wastes wastes in conceptual designs for the UK Geological Disposal Facility.

Advanced nuclear materials.
Research is focused on the development of new materials and processes for application in future nuclear fission and fusion fuel cycles. We are currently developing novel processing methods for advanced cermet fuels with application in naval reactor concepts, ceramic clad materials for accident tolerant nuclear fuels, and the application of molten salts technology to reprocessing of nuclear fuels. We are also working on new waste management strategies for future fuel cycles, to reduce the ultimate geological disposal footprint.

Structure-property relations in mixed metal oxides.
Research is focused on the study of structure-property relationships in perovskite related oxides showing a range of useful physical properties such as high temperature superconductivity, colossal magnetoresistance and anisotropic magnetic exchange. Recent work has investigated structure-property relationships in layered perovskite ferroelectrric oxides and oxide-fluorides.

Professor Sherif El-Khamisy
S.El-Khamisy@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology

Research Interests:

Mammalian genome stability in health and disease. I head the human DNA repair group aiming to understand how defects in repairing DNA damage cause degenerative disorders and cancer. Our lab is primarily funded by fellowships from the Wellcome Trust and the Lister Institute of Preventive Medicine.

Dr Claire Elcock
c.elcock@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Oral clinical phenotyping, involving the accurate measurement of oral parameters using image analysis.


Normal and abnormal oral growth and development, including investigations into anomalies of tooth number, size, form and structure.


Quantification of dental plaque and periodontal disease.


Child protection, children and young people's oral health, oral neuroscience.

Professor Michelle Marshall
m.marshall@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Academic Unit of Medical Education

My interests focus on student engagement within the education process and in different educational contexts and environments so that students are able to achieve their potential.  I also have an interest in social accountability and what it means to be socially accountable in health professions education. 

Professor Jeremy Oakley
j.oakley@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Mathematics and Statistics

My research interests are in Bayesian statistics, in particular uncertainty quantification for complex computer models, eliciting probability distributions from experts, and applications in Health Economics. On my personal website you can read these guidance notes for more information about PhD projects and suggested background reading.

Dr Georgina Rowse
g.rowse@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Psychology

Research interests

Psychosis: early intervention in psychosis, sleep, cultural/religious and spiritual explanations of experiences, role of early experience and the continuum model of experiences (through the lifespan).

Mindfulness in education. 

Young people and Inflammatory Bowel Disease: identity, transition and health behaviours. 

Miss Jill Carlton
J.Carlton@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests

Broad Research Interests:

My research interests are health-related quality of life and patient outcome measures. In 2006 I was awarded a fellowship (Researcher Development Award) through the National Co-ordinating Centre for Research Capacity Development, NCCRCD). My PhD involved designing a paediatric disease-specific health related quality of life measure for amblyopia. The Child Amblyopia Treatment Questionnaire (CAT-QoL) is a short questionnaire that was designed for children aged 4-7 years to measure the impact of amblyopia treatment from the child’s perspective. 

 

Research Methods I can Supervise:

  • Instrument Development
  • Mixed Methods

 

Specific Areas of Interest:

  • Paediatric
  • Quality of Life
Dr Aymen Idris
aymen.idris@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism
The Medical School

Research interests

The primary interest of my research group is in the area of pharmacology of inflammation in cancer. The specific aims of our research are to (a) uncover novel pathways essential for the regulation of immune - cancer - bone cell crosstalk, and (b) develop and test new therapeutic agents for the management of a variety of inflammatory disorders and metastases. As an MSc./Ph.D. student and postdoctoral researcher, I carried out significant research on the therapeutic and harmful effects of natural and synthetic anti-inflammatory substances, with first-author publications in a number of prestigious scientific journals including Nature Medicine, Ageing Cell and Cell Metabolism. As laboratory leader, my preclinical research led to the foundation of arthElix Ltd. and OsteoRX Ltd. - two start-up companies established to develop novel anti-rheumatic and anti-metastatic drugs.

Dr Hajime Kinoshita
h.kinoshita@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

Research interests

Dr Kinoshita's interests are in the environmental-friendly applications of materials, his research programmes at the Immobilisation Science Laboratory (Department of Materials Science and Engineering) extend from nuclear waste management to CO2 storage. His researches focus on fabrication and characterisation of oxide-based materials to improve their capacity to host aiming compounds and the compatibility of the products to the environment. Based on thermodynamics, both experimental and computational techniques are used for the research.

Key projects
- Low temperature synthesis of ceramics for nuclear waste immobilisation.
- CO2 storage in recycled cementitious waste materials using molten salt media.
- Electrochemical leaching of nuclear waste forms for prediction of long-term integrity, in collaboration with collaboration with Tokyo Institute of Technology.

Dr David Littlewood
David.Littlewood@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

PhD Supervision

I am currently supervising four PhD students at Sheffield University Management School:

  • Bala Auwalu (Joint 1st supervisor, start date October 2016)
  • Valentina Varbanova (2nd supervisor, start date May 2017)
  • Dian Eka Mayasari (Joint 1st supervisor, start date February 2017)
  • Zara Seini (Joint 1st supervisor, start date April 2017)

Recent completed PhD students:

  • Irene Garnelo Gómez. ‘I Live Sustainably’: Exploring sustainable narratives through the lens of identity expression and motivational drives (Second supervisor). Henley Business School, University of Reading Scholarship.

I would be interested in supervising PhD or postgraduate taught students in the areas of:

  • Social entrepreneurship, social innovation and hybrid organisation
  • CSR in both the developed and developing country context
  • The informal economy
  • Business and society relationships, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa"
Professor Albert Ong
a.ong@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease
The Medical School

Research interests

I lead the Kidney Genetics Group at the University of Sheffield. Its major research interests are in the molecular genetics, cell biology and pathogenesis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). In particular, we aim to discover new treatments for ADPKD, to understand better how cysts form and grow in the ADPKD kidney and to improve the clinical management of ADPKD patients.

ADPKD is one of the most common monogenic human diseases known and affects around 1 in 500 people. It is caused by mutations in two genes, PKD1 and PKD2. ADPKD accounts for ~10% of patients with kidney failure in most renal units and affects up to 10 million people worldwide. It is also a major cause of sudden death and disability in younger patients due to intracranial aneurysm rupture.

Professor Kypros Pilakoutas
k.pilakoutas@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

Research interests

Prof Pilakoutas' research is in the fields of:

  • Structural Concrete
    Shear, Punching shear, Ductility, Deflections, Crack Width, Nunerical Modelling
     
  • FRP
    All aspects of behaviour of Internal and Externally Bonded Reinforcement, including Durability and Nunerical Modelling
     
  • Fibre Reinforcements
    Steel, PP, Glass and all recycled fibres. All aspects of behaviour of cast, sprayed or roller compacted FRC and Nunerical Modelling
     
  • Construction Innovation
    Novel types of Reinforcement and Strengthening, Couplers, Terminators, Cold Formed sections, Composite sections, 3-Printing, Recycled Aggregates, Recycled Fillers, Recycled Natural Materials, Rubberised Concrete, Structures made of ice, Coastal Concrete Structures, Functional Origami Structures
     
  • Earthquake Engineering
    All aspects of behaviour of Reinforced Concrete Structures including Shear Walled Structures, Repair and Strengthening using FRP and Post Tensioned Metal Straps (PTMS), Seismic Risk Assessment and Management, Vulnerability Assessment, Novel Energy Dissipation Structural Elements

 

Dr Charles Rouge
c.rouge@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

My current research interests revolve around:

  • Water resilience: modelling approaches and indicators to diagnose and measure robustness, resilience and vulnerability of water supply and water supply infrastructure; applying these approaches to understand what resilience means in complex multi-scale, multi-actor systems
  • Informing forecast development: using exploratory modelling and machine learning approaches to understand which forecast products are or would be most useful for water managers; implications for water infrastructure design that accounts for future operations and how these will be informed by forecasts.
  • A human and natural water cycle: detection and attribution of human activity in the water cycle; representation in hydrological models; consequences for present and future water resources.
  • Transboundary and developing river basins: large-scale optimisation models to promote development and management paths that protect and empower a range of water users from all riparian countries, and promote meaningful adaptation to climate change; food and energy implications of development
Professor Joanna Shapland
J.M.Shapland@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Law

Research Interests

My research interests span victimisation and victimology, restorative justice, business and crime, the informal economy, desistance, crime prevention and social control, and comparative criminal justice.

Currently, I am engaged in research for the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) on what is quality in probation supervision, as well as continuing to analyse our work on how offenders stop committing offences (desistance). I am also writing about worldwide trends in restorative justice.

Member of the Centre for Criminological Research (University Research Centre)
Member of the Centre for Well-Being in Public Policy (University Research Centre)
Member of CRISP – the centre for research on the informal economy

Areas of Research Supervision

  • Criminal justice
  • Victimisation, victimology and victims in the criminal justice system
  • Restorative justice
  • Business and crime
  • Offending, desistance and offending careers
Dr Harrison Smith
harrison.smith@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies
Research Interests
Harrison’s research focuses on the political economy of data analytics. He is particularly interested in the sociology of data-driven marketing and media in contemporary urban environments. This can include mobile and geolocative media, but also digital out-of-home and the Internet of Things. He is interested in understanding how these technologies reshape urban and domestic environments, and how commercial organizations extract and analyze data for market applications. His current research examines the political economy of 5G infrastructure and data-management platforms. 
 
Harrison is interested in supervising students on topics such as:
  • Smart cities and startups 
  • Mobile, geolocative, and wearable media
  • Infrastructures of media, marketing, and advertising
  • Surveillance studies, privacy, and data governance
  • Political economies of data analytics industries
  • The social implications of automation and artificial intelligence
  • Data-driven capitalism and social theory
Professor Joy Stackhouse
j.stackhouse@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Human Communication Sciences (old code)

Research interests

Along with Professor Bill Wells, also at Sheffield, I have developed a psycholinguistic framework for the assessment and management of children with speech and literacy difficulties. I have used longitudinal group and case studies to predict speech and language outcomes in children, to identify at risk children, and to plan appropriate intervention programmes. Participants have included children with normal and atypical phonological development, dyspraxia, dysarthria, cleft palate, Down syndrome, dyslexia and non-fluency. A main focus has been the relationship between speech, phonological awareness and spelling, and current work examines this in different languages and scripts (e.g. German, Arabic, Mandarin, Greek). My research has followed up children with speech and language difficulties into adulthood and I am involved in projects with children, teenagers and young offenders from socially disadvantaged backgrounds. Training school staff and others is included in these projects.

Dr Pirashanthie Vivekananda-Schmidt
p.vivekananda-schmidt@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Academic Unit of Medical Education
The Medical School

My research broadly fits into understanding factors that influences student performance and in Professional development, including professionalism, moral and ethical aspects of practice, and inter-professional working. I am interested in and have an established track record in improving students’ learning experience through, Technology Enhanced Learning.  Through my publications I have contributed to the learning of ethics in healthcare, developing ethical reasoning, professionalism and safe practice.

My current work and recent publications attempt to answer questions of why there maybe disparities in academic performance between different student sub groups, better understanding ethical issues during decision making and patient management, and how technology can help us to improve student experience. 

Dr Elizabeth Craig-Atkins
e.craig-atkins@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Archaeology

Research interests:

I am a specialist in human osteology and palaeopathology with particular interests in multidisciplinary approaches to questions surrounding past population structures, health, disease and lifestyle. I have worked with human remains from many periods and locations, but have primarily focussed on material from post-Roman to modern periods in the UK. My current main areas of research include:

  • Multidisciplinary analysis of osteological and funerary data from early medieval to post-medieval contexts
  • The character and provision of funerary practices in early Christian and medieval England
  • Health status and social status in past populations
  • Disease, disability and disfigurement in the past (including social attitudes to sickness and medical/surgical interventions)
  • The archaeology of childhood
  • Archaeology of the body, especially practices for managing, manipulating and curating human remains
Professor Philip Benson
p.benson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Research interests

My primary research interest is investigating the effectiveness of contemporary orthodontictechniques and practice. I am the principal or co-author on five systematic reviews published in the Cochrane Library and I have planned, coordinated and completed several randomised controlled clinical trials. I am also interested in oral health-related quality of life and in particular developing patient reported outcomes to measure the impact of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment on young peoples’ everyday lives.

Dr Harriet Cameron
h.cameron@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Education

Harriet is interested in the discourses of learning, learning difference and learning identity. She is particularly interested in the way language around learning disabilities and differences comes to shape the way diagnoses of autism, (specific) learning disability, ADHD and mental ill-health are constructed in specific places, spaces and times. Harriet is also interested in the lived experiences of people who come to be categorised as ‘deficient’ in learning or communicating, and in how systems, processes, and policies interact with these experiences, both in ‘western’ contexts and in the global South.

Dr Judy Clegg
j.clegg@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Human Communication Sciences
Health Sciences School

Research interests

Developmental speech, language and communication needs:

  • Developmental trajectories and long term outcomes of children with speech, language and communication needs (SLCN)
  • Impact of social disadvantage on children’s speech, language and communication development
  • Complex co-morbidity between speech and language development, social disadvantage, behavior and mental health in children and adolescents
  • Evaluating the effectiveness of speech and language therapy interventions for children and adolescents
Dr Judy Clegg
j.clegg@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Human Communication Sciences (old code)

Research interests

Developmental speech, language and communication needs:

  • Developmental trajectories and long term outcomes of children with speech, language and communication needs (SLCN)
  • Impact of social disadvantage on children’s speech, language and communication development
  • Complex co-morbidity between speech and language development, social disadvantage, behavior and mental health in children and adolescents
  • Evaluating the effectiveness of speech and language therapy interventions for children and adolescents
Dr Helen Colley
h.colley@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is the 6th most common cancers worldwide. The survival rate for head and neck cancer is poor. This is largely due to late diagnosis and a lack of effective therapeutic agents.


My particular research interest is in the development of multi-cellular three dimensional in vitro models of the oral mucosa in health and disease. My current research utilises these models to develop; new methods of detecting oral pre-cancer, novel drugs to treat oral cancer and new modes of drug delivery systems.

Dr Julie Dickinson
julie.dickinson@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Research Interests 

My research interests are in teaching and learning pedagogies including inter-disciplinary learning.  I recently obtained a Senior Fellowship of the Higher Education Academy and I'm currently conducting research into student feedback and distance learning courses.  I am also keen to develop my experience in public health related research and working with students on research projects.

Professor Julie Gottlieb
julie.gottlieb@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of History

Research interests

Julie's research interests lie in modern British political history, the history of extremism (with a focus on right-wing extremism in Britain), the construction of gender identities in the political sphere, and the history of mental health in times of crisis. She has published widely on women, gender and politics between the wars, including the role of women in Britain's fascist movement, women and the peace movement, and gender and appeasement.

Professor Zi-Qiang Lang
z.lang@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering
Research interests:
  • Nonlinear system modeling, analysis and design in the frequency domain
  • Health monitoring and fault detection of engineering systems and structures
  • Smart structures and systems
  • Wind turbine system condition monitoring and control
  • Passive and semi-active vibration control with applications in marine, automobile, civil, and earthquake engineering
  • Development of new healthcare technologies using complex system modelling and analysis approaches
Professor Marcelo Rivolta
m.n.rivolta@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Biomedical Science

Research Interests

Deafness is a major public health issue worldwide, with more than 3 million people in the UK alone enduring a moderate to profound hearing loss. The Rivolta laboratory is dedicated to study the biology and behaviour of auditory stem cells (primarily human) and to explore their potential to regenerate the damaged inner ear.

Read more on research in the Rivolta laboratory

Dr Nicolas Van de Sijpe
n.vandesijpe@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Economics

Most of Nicolas’ current research uses cross-country data to study the effectiveness of foreign aid. This includes work on the fungibility of education and health aid, and on a new method to identify the causal effect of aid in a panel data context, used to study the domestic absorption of aid. In addition, he is involved in research on the nexus between child labour and school achievement in Peru.

Nicolas would consider supervising PhD students with a focus on applied econometrics in a number of fields, including development economics and political economy.

Mr Andrew Clayden
a.clayden@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Landscape Architecture

Research interests

Recent research activity has focused on three areas which include: sustainable approaches to housing design and specification of landscape materials, cemetery design and management and finally the application of digital technologies in design education. The first two may not immediately appear related but have a loose connection in terms of landscape and sustainability. Cemetery research specifically focuses on the Natural Burial movement and what we can learn about society from these new landscapes of death and disposal. In 2007 I was awarded a three-year research grant (300K) from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) to investigate the cultural and social implications of natural burial.

The housing research seeks to broaden our understanding of how buildings and their environment may be thought of in a more integrated manner in order to improve their sustainable profile.

The final area of interest, digital technologies and landscape perception and education explore the role of computers in enabling designers and users to experience and evaluate designs which have yet to be realised.

Professor Simon Heller
s.heller@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism
The Medical School

Research interests

Our group´s interests concern clinical research, focussing on clinical investigation involving varied topics with the common theme of immediate relevance to patients with diabetes. These include aspects of the pathophysiology of hypoglycaemia in diabetes, the contribution of hypoglycaemia to the increased risk of sudden death in young people with Type 1 diabetes (the 'dead in bed' syndrome), the clinical benefits of insulin analogues and trials of complex interventions to enable more effective self-management in people with diabetes.

Our observation that hypoglycaemia unawareness is caused by repeated episodes of hypoglycaemia has led to programmes of unawareness reversal and restoration of hypoglycaemic symptoms in patients with Type 1 diabetes. We have also recently completed a national multicentre project funded by the Dept for Transport exploring the incidence of hypoglycaemia in Type 2 diabetes to inform decisions on motor vehicle licensing.

We were the principal investigators for the multi-centre DAFNE trial and lead a national programme of research exploring different facets of the DAFNE education programme. We are one of the lead investigators for the ongoing DESMOND trial and lead a national multicentre trial measuring the benefit of blood glucose monitoring in those with newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes.

Professor Roger Lewis
Roger.Lewis@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

Roger's research interests are split into three areas: solving industrial wear problems; application and development of a novel ultrasonic technique for machine element contact analysis and design of engineering components and machines. The research themes are wide ranging, but the main focus is on:

Railway Engineering

  • Wheel/rail contact tribology – including wear (wheel profile evolution), RCF, friction management (use of top of rail friction modifiers; grease lubrication and traction gels), isolation and links to effective train detection
  • Rail infrastructure improvement – including laser cladding of rail to reduce wear/RCF; design and testing of insulated rail joints; overhead line wear testing
  • Condition monitoring – including real-time measurement of the wheel/rail contact; force measurement and detection of loosening in bolted joints.

Human Interactions

  • Fundamental characterization and modelling of skin friction including use of OCT to determine sub-surface skin strain
  • Hand/object interactions – including kitchen equipment, sports equipment etc. and effects that wearing medical examination gloves has on dexterity, grip and tactile discrimination
  • Human tissue interaction with medical devices including catheters
  • Pedestrian slips and falls, particularly barefoot slips and characterisation of flooring performance
  • Multi-scale modelling of skin to incorporate effects of moisture and temperature to optimise design of medical products that interface with skin.
Professor John Newell-Price
j.newellprice@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism
The Medical School

Research interests

John Newell-Price Is Professor of Endocrinology. He trained in medicine at the University of Cambridge and then the Royal London Hospital. He did his specialist training in endocrinology at St. Bartholomew's Hospital, London, where he was an MRC Training Fellow from 1995-1998, and ahs been at the University of Sheffield since 2000.  At Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust he leads the busy Specialist Endocrine Services. 

The focus of both his clinical and basic research is glucocorticoids (steroids). His group has identified important aspects of epigenetic regulation of proopiomelanocortin, the key regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and now is using this information to design strategies to modify over-expression in conditions of excess hormone secretion, such as Cushing's disease.

The clinical research programme has been investigating means of inhibiting excess ACTH and cortisol in man and improving cortisol replacement in adrenally insufficient patients, in first in man studies to Phase 3 registration studies. 

Other work focuses on the diagnostic and management strategies for patients with Cushing's syndrome, and those also for patients with neuroendocrine tumours.

Dr Yu Chen
yu.chen@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of East Asian Studies

Research interests

Dr Chen’s research interests are in China’s urbanisation and rural-to-urban migration. China is experiencing the largest migration wave in human history, with hundreds of millions of people moving from the countryside to cities to seek better life. She is interested in the social, economic, spatial and environmental consequences of such massive urbanisation.

She is currently working on the following projects:

ESRC/CASS Urban Transformations: Urban Development, Migration, Segregation and Inequality (2015--2018). This project aims to bring together researchers from the University of Glasgow, University of Sheffield and the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, to develop new ideas, innovative methods and analysis on the impacts of migration on urban development, the related social-spatial segregation and public policy challenges.

ESRC/GCRF: Dynamics of Health & Environmental Inequalities in Hebei Province, China (2017–2018). This project aims to develop the data infrastructure and to examine the social and health impacts of rapid urbanisation and air pollution, in order to improve decision support tools for economic and social policy.

She is also interested in rural-to-urban migrants and their life prospects. Her previous projects examined the aspirations and socio-economic integration of new-generation migrants in urban China.

She welcomes applications from prospective PhD students in the fields of urbanisation, migration, urban development and housing.

Dr Ruth Herbert
r.herbert@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Human Communication Sciences
Health Sciences School

Research interests

Since 2001 I have been researching word-finding difficulties in aphasia, supported by grants from the Tavistock Trust for Aphasia, the Stroke Association, and the Health Foundation. 

The main aims are to:

  • improve diagnosis through the refinement of assessment in noun syntax
  • improve our knowledge of aphasia in other languages in particular in Arabic
  • expand the evidence base of effective rehabilitation methods including phonological and orthographic therapy, interactional therapy, and noun syntax therapy
  • develop novel forms of intervention such as STAR software incorporating noun syntax
  • devise new outcome measures for anomia and aphasia such as the POWERS assessment

A relatively new strand of research, supported by grants from the Stroke Association and from South Yorkshire CLAHRC, investigates access to health information for people with aphasia. To date we have:

  • developed accessible information guidelines for staff working with people with aphasia
  • produced a template for making information accessible
  • delivered specific images and text to the Stroke Association, which they are producing as a clinical resource to help people with aphasia and their families
Dr Ruth Herbert
r.herbert@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Human Communication Sciences (old code)

Research interests

Since 2001 I have been researching word-finding difficulties in aphasia, supported by grants from the Tavistock Trust for Aphasia, the Stroke Association, and the Health Foundation. 

The main aims are to:

  • improve diagnosis through the refinement of assessment in noun syntax
  • improve our knowledge of aphasia in other languages in particular in Arabic
  • expand the evidence base of effective rehabilitation methods including phonological and orthographic therapy, interactional therapy, and noun syntax therapy
  • develop novel forms of intervention such as STAR software incorporating noun syntax
  • devise new outcome measures for anomia and aphasia such as the POWERS assessment

A relatively new strand of research, supported by grants from the Stroke Association and from South Yorkshire CLAHRC, investigates access to health information for people with aphasia. To date we have:

  • developed accessible information guidelines for staff working with people with aphasia
  • produced a template for making information accessible
  • delivered specific images and text to the Stroke Association, which they are producing as a clinical resource to help people with aphasia and their families


Professor Kate Reed
k.reed@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Research interests

My research focuses on two areas: the social and ethical implications of genetic screening and the impact of novel technological application in medicine. These interests are reflected in two of my most recent projects. The first was a project funded by the The Wellcome Trust which focused on exploring the gendered nature of genetic screening in pregnancy. The second, a recently completed British Academy funded project on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) use in pregnancy. The findings from this project were recently presented at an interdisciplinary dissemination event funded by the Sociology of Health and Illness Foundation (December 2013). I am currently collaborating with the medical school and local NHS to develop this imaging work further, focusing in particular on the role of imaging in post-mortem. I am also continuing to develop research bids in the area of genetics, family history and health.

Students with an interest in the new genetics, and reproductive technology would be particularly welcome. I would also welcome supervising students with interests in the areas of social theory, race and ethnicity, gender studies.

Prof Dame Pamela Shaw
pamela.shaw@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Neuroscience
The Medical School

Research interests

The Sheffield Institute of Translational Neuroscience, established as part of a major strategic initiative within the University of Sheffield is well-placed to harness the revolutionary developments in biomedical science for the benefit of patients with neurodegenerative disease. The major goal of my group is to elucidate the functioning of motor neurones in health and disease and to translate these basic science findings into health benefits for patients afflicted with degenerative motor system disorders.

My research group consists of a multidisciplinary team of basic and clinical scientists investigating molecular mechanisms of neurodegeneration in disorders of the human motor system, particularly motor neurone disease (MND), spinal muscular atrophy and hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP). The Neurology group is closely linked with Neuropathology, headed by Professor Paul Ince. The research resources underpinning this programme include clinical material (Biobanks of DNA, blood RNA, CSF, fibroblasts and CNS tissue donated by patients for research); and in vitro and in vivo experimental models employed to investigate molecular mechanisms of motor neurone injury including genetic perturbations, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and disorders of RNA processing.

Professor Alison Gartland
a.gartland@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism
The Medical School

Research interests

My research group is interested in how our bones function in health and disease with an emphasis on cancer. We are interested in knowing why primary bone cancers occur and how to best treat them. We are also interested in trying to understand why and how primary cancers such as breast and prostate spread preferentially to bone. Other interests include investigating mechanisms leading to osteoarthritis and failure of orthopedic implants. We use cutting edge scientific techniques and technologies, both in vitro and in vivo,  to answer clinically relevant questions.   

Dr Laura Gray
laura.gray@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

My main research interests lie in applied micro-econometrics and health. I am interested in supervising students using econometric methods to analyse individual behaviour. My previous research has included a range of quantitative methods including factor analysis, structural equation modelling, growth models and mixture models as well as methods for dealing with missing data.

I am particularly interested in obesity across different stages of life and how and why BMI changes over time. My current fellowship focuses on the causes and consequences of risky BMI trajectories in older adults.

Professor Sally Hines
sally.hines@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies
I have much experience of supervising PhD students to completion. These are some of the areas my previous research students have worked in:
 
Masculinity, Emotion and Music
Masculinity and War
Heterosexual Identities
Asexuality 
Young People and Social Media
Bisexuality 
Sex Work
Violence and Gender
Young People and Gender
Sexuality and Class
Trans and Non-binary Identities
Trans and Health 
 
I am particularly interested in working with students whose interests relate to the following areas:
 
Gender Studies - including trans and non-binary
Feminist Theory and Practice 
Masculinities Studies
Sexualities
Social Movements
Intimacies and Personal Life
Citizenship and Recognition 
Reproduction 
Feminist STS Studies
Identity Studies
The Body
Dr Amanda Loban
A.Loban@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Health and Related Research

Current projects

  • DiPALS - RCT evaluating diaphragm pacing in patients with MND
  • DiPEP - Diagnosis of Pulmonary Embolism (PE) in Pregnancy
  • HubBLe - Haemorrhoidal Artery Ligation versus Rubber Band Ligation for haemorrhoids
  • Hydro DMD - Hydrotherapy for Duchenne muscular distrophy: a pilot and feasibility RCT in children
  • Meridian - MRI to enhance the diagnosis of fetal developmental brain abnormalities in utero
  • PaINTED - Pandemic influenza triage in the emergency department
  • PLEASANT - Preventing and lessening exacerbations of asthma in school age children
  • STEPWISE - Structured lifestyle education for people with schizophrenia
  • TABUL - Ultrasound compared to biopsy of temporal arteries in giant cell arteritis (GCA)
  • YHS - Yorkshire Health Study
Dr Keyvan Moharamzadeh
k.moharamzadeh@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

School of Clinical Dentistry

I am interested in multidisciplinary research in the field of dental biomaterials and tissue engineering. My main research activities fall into four different categories:

  • Tissue engineering of human oral mucosa and development of three-dimensional tissue models for various in vitro applications.
  • Biocompatibility assessment of dental biomaterials and oral healthcare products.
  • Chemical synthesis and analysis of polymers and composite materials used in dentistry and medicine.
  • Investigation of physical and optical properties of different types of aesthetic dental materials.

See:
Centre for Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering:
http://www.cbte.group.shef.ac.uk/research/te6.html
and
Bioengineering and Health Technologies Research Group

Dr Sophie Rutter
s.rutter@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Information School

Information behaviour and information use

My research focuses on how the environment influences the way people interact with, and use, information. My research so far has been broadly based on school children, information seeking and health communication.  

Research supervision

I am particularly interested in hearing from research students focusing on the following areas:

  • how different user groups (i.e. children, professionals and so on) use information, and the influence of the environment on this 
  • use of search technologies and what success might mean 
  • where a co-production methodology will be used


Professor Karl Taylor
k.b.taylor@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Economics

Research interests

Karl's research interests lie in the area of applied microeconometrics focusing on labour economics, the economics of education and, household financial decision-making. His research has focused on individual, household and firm-level data including matched workplace-employee data. Examples of research projects include empirical analysis of the reservation wages of the unemployed (ESRC) and empirical analysis of wage growth, human capital and risk aversion (Leverhulme Trust). He has been involved in advisory reports for the Home Office and more recently the Department of Health looking at the minimum pricing of alcohol. Karl is interested in supervising PhD students in applied microeconometrics.

Dr Kevin Thwaites
k.thwaites@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Landscape Architecture

Research interests

Research interests and activities focus on two main themes which are integrated into approaches to research-led-teaching.

Theory and philosophy of urban landscape design and their impact on the intellectual underpinning and conceptual development of design processes and spatial languages;

Socially sustainable approaches to planning and design in urban open spaces, particularly how spatial and experiential dimensions converge to influence psychological health and well-being.

These general areas of interest converge in Experiential Landscape and Socially Restorative Urbanism, a research stream concerned with applying an integrated approach to human-environment relations to place making in urban open space settings.

Dr Nicole Baumgarten
n.baumgarten@sheffield.ac.uk

School of Languages and Cultures

 Research interests

I welcome research students who are interested in applied linguistics in its broadest sense. Qualitative and multiple/mixed methods approaches (incl. participatory and inclusive designs), interdisciplinary research as well as collaborations with institutions and organizations outside the University are all welcome. Interesting topics include but are not restricted to the following

 

  • Individual multilingualism (from a socio-cultural perspective)
  • Intercultural communication
  • Interpersonal communication
  • English as a Lingua Franca
  • Translation and localization
  • Multimodal communication (including audiovisual translation)
  • Intercultural/contrastive pragmatics
  • Register analysis (comparative/diachronic)
  • Communication in organizations and institutions (including web-based communication)
  • Business communication
  • Interaction with technology (including user studies)
  • Technology and science communication
  • Risk, health and safety communication
  • Medical communication
  • Second language use
  • Second language identities

 

Professor Kurt De Vos
k.de_vos@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Neuroscience
The Medical School

Research interests

Research in the laboratory focuses on the mechanisms of nerve cell death in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; also known as motor neuron disease (MND) or Lou Gehrig disease), hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) and Parkinson’s disease (PD). We are especially interested in the involvement of axonal transport, mitochondria and ER.

Current research themes include:

  • The mechanisms causing defective axonal transport of mitochondria in ALS, PD and HSP.
  • The cellular roles of C9ORF72 protein and their role in ALS and FTD
  • The biology of close contacts between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria and their involvement in health and disease

Work in the lab is funded by grants from the Medical Research Council (MRC), the Thierry Latran Foundation, the Motor Neurone Disease Association (MNDA), the Spastic Paraplegia Foundation, and the Moody Endowment Fund.

Professor Angie Hobbs
a.hobbs@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Philosophy

Research interests

Most of my work is in ancient Greek philosophy and in ethics (both ancient and modern), and I have broad interests across both fields. Topics that I particularly focus on are: the ethics of flourishing and virtue ethics; courage, heroism and fame; concepts of 'manliness'; war and peace; love and desire; mental health and illness; relations between philosophy and literature; relations between ethics and aesthetics. In Plato and the Hero I concentrate on Plato's critique of the notions and embodiments of 'manliness' and courage prevalent in his culture (particularly those in Homer), and his attempt to redefine them in accordance with his own ethical, psychological and metaphysical principles. The question of why courage is necessary in the flourishing life in its turn leads to Plato's bid to unify the noble and the beneficial, and the tensions this unification creates between human and divine ideals.

I am currently working on a new translation of and commentary on Plato's Symposium (for Oxford University Press) and a book on heroism, courage and fame.

Dr Frank Hopfgartner
f.hopfgartner@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Information School

Research interests

My main research interests are:

  • Interactive Information Systems such as information retrieval, knowledge sharing, enterprise search, and recommender systems.
  • Experience in user modelling, gamification, personalized search and recommendation, user-centric evaluation, and other challenges that center around satisfying users’ information needs.

Research supervision

Some potential project ideas are: 

Document Analysis: Automatic information extraction, indexing, semantic analysis of text documents, analysis of low-level multimedia features, and the application of deep learning methods to classify multimedia content. Manual methods include work on engaging the crowd for data and document annotation and categorization.

Self-tracking & lifelogging and its potentials for personalization. Interested in the analysis, and visualisation of sensor and lifelogging data. Other challenges pertain processing vast amounts of data and identifying user interests, skills etc. and their usage in real world systems like health or recommendation systems.

Professor Endre Kiss-Toth
e.kiss-toth@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease
The Medical School

Research interests

My group is interested in identifying novel regulators of inflammatory signal transduction, characterising their basic mechanism of action, as well as validating some of these novel genes as potential drug targets for therapeutic intervention in chronic inflammatory diseases.

Much of our recent work has been focussing on studying the biological importance of the tribbles (TRIB) family of pseudokinases in cell types that are relevant to the development of cardiovascular disease.

In addition, we have also been collaborating closely with several research groups, from the US and Europe to characterise the role tribbles proteins play in the development and progression of cancer.

Most recently, we begun to develop approaches that enable us to selectively target TRIBs with the aim to use these as a platform for future drug development.

To support our research goals, we have established a global network of collaborators to pursue joint projects that aim to understand the importance of tribbles in cell biology, both in health and disease.

Professor Sarah Rowland-Jones
s.l.rowland-jones@sheffield.ac.uk

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease

Sarah Rowland-Jones has extensive experience in the cellular immunology of viral infections and a strong interest in global health. Her work has focused in the past on T-cell responses to HIV infection in cohorts in Africa and China, as well as dengue virus, CMV, EBV and influenza A. She is currently collaborating with Professor Rashida Ferrand (LSHTM) on laboratory studies of older children and adolescents with perinatally-acquired HIV infection in Zimbabwe, many of whom experience serious comorbidities affecting their lungs, heart, musculoskeletal system, skin and CNS. Current studies have focused on the potential role of Cytomegalovirus co-infection in disease pathogenesis, host genetics of delayed disease progression and the longevity of responses to childhood vaccines. Within Sheffield our group is also planning studies of the immune response to viruses in patients who have received autologous stem cell transplants, usually for autoimmune disease

Dr Melanie Hassett
melanie.hassett@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research

My research interest lies in internationalization strategies, particularly cross-border mergers and acquisitions (M&As), post-acquisition socio-cultural integration and organisational change, emotions and cultural differences. Currently my research focuses on emotions in M&As and M&As from emerging economies, particularly India. I am also very interested in research methods particularly qualitative research methods, longitudinal, case study and mixed method approaches.

PhD Supervision

I am interested in supervising PhD students in the following areas:

  • International mergers and acquisitions
  • Post-acquisition integration and socio-cultural integration
  • Internationalisation (SMEs and MNEs)
  • Emotions, social capital, informal networks in the context of internationalisation and/or mergers and acquisitions

Publications

Hurmerinta, L., Paavilainen-Mantymaki, E. and Hassett, M. E. (2016). TEMPUS FUGIT: A hermeneutic approach to the internationalization process. Management International Review, 56(6) 805-825.

Hassett, M., Vincze, Z., Urs, U. and Angwin, D. (2016), “Cross-Border Mergers and Acquisitions from India: Motives and Integration Strategies of Indian Acquirers”, in Marinova, S., Larimo, J. & Nummela, N., Value Creation in International Business, Palgrave Macmillan-SpringerDegbey, pp. 109-139.

Degbey, W. and Hassett, M.E. (2016), “Creating value in cross-border M&As through strategic networks”, in Heinz Tüselmann, Stephen Buzdugan, Qi Cao, David Freund and Sougand Golesorkhi, Impact of International Business: Challenges and Solutions for Policy and Practice, Palgrave Macmillan: Basingstoke, pp. 158–177.

Nummela, N. and Hassett, M. (2016), “Opening the black box of acquisition capabilities”, in Risberg, A., King, D. and Meglio, O., The Routledge Companion of Mergers and Acquisitions, Routledge Companion Series, Routledge: Oxon, pp. 74–91.

Professor David Stone
d.a.stone@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering

Research interests

Prof Stone has interests in all facets of power electronics and energy storage, including:

  • Development of ‘smart’ battery packs for all-electric and hybrid-electric vehicles, based on both Li-based chemistries, Ni-MH and VRLA cells containing cell state-of-charge monitoring and conditioning electronics to extend the lifetime of the cells. Incorporation of observer techniques into state of function monitoring for cells to increase operation lifetime and consumer confidence in battery technology.
  • Investigation into second life operation of EV batteries for Grid support and localised energy storage.
  • High efficiency EV-contact less battery charging
  • Modelling and control of novel fluorescent lamps to improve the efficiency of light generation. Incorporation of physical lamp models (based on electron energy level interactions) into both Simulink and spice based packages has led to novel lamp models based on the physical interactions within the plasma
  • Design, modelling and digital control of high-order resonant converter topologies for high frequency switched mode power supplies for use in ‘white goods’, and concentrates on the analysis and design of high order resonant converter topologies, with the inclusion of piezzo electric transformers where possible.
  • Investigation into high frequency, high power, resonant converters for induction heating applications. Continuing work is now looking at the use of high frequency matrix converters (operating above 150kHz) for direct ac-ac conversion for heating applications.
  • Design and digital control of matrix converters for aerospace and sub-sea applications in specialist environments.
  • Power Electronics Packaging for high temperature and harsh environments, including high temperature gate drive design and thermal management of converters


Dr Mark Bass
mark.bass@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Biomedical Science

Research interests

Healing defects are one of the largest current health challenges, with chronic wounds frequently requiring amputation of the affected limb. In 2008, 200,000 UK patients were suffering chronic wounds, costing the health service £3.1 billion annually.  Since then, a 26-49% increase in risk factors such as age and diabetes has made the situation worse. 

Upon wounding healthy skin, inflammatory cells combat infection, fibroblasts migrate into the wound bed and contract the defect, and finally re-epithelialisation closes the gap.  However, these processes become less efficient with age and risk factors such as diabetes, obesity or smoking, eventually leading to the formation of chronic wounds that include pressure ulcers, venous leg ulcers and diabetic foot ulcers.

 

We are investigating the processes of fibroblast recruitment and wound re-epitheliasation with a view to developing new therapies to promote healing.  Part of our work focuses on the signalling by adhesion receptors that detect the changes in skin upon injury.  We investigate the signalling through Rho-family GTPases that regulate cell migration and receptor trafficking.  We are finding that these pathways influence wound healing, but in more recent work we are finding that they also impact on cancer progression.  Importantly, our projects in collaboration with the hospital and industry are translating our advances in basic biomedical science into practical application.  We have developed ultrasonic strategies that reduce healing time by 40% and can be applied to human patients.  By doing so, we are able to investigate fields that span from basic molecular science fields of signalling and migration to therapeutic outcomes.

Dr Matthias Benzer
m.benzer@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Research interests

Matthias’s research has focused on contemporary Sociological Theory and Social Science Methodology. His work explores the potential contributions of Critical and Poststructuralist Social Theory to the sociological study of contemporary capitalist society: of its dominant social relations and of their implications for human life and thought. Moreover, Matthias has examined the methodological challenges of 20th and 21st century Social Theory to Sociology’s epistemological, empirical and methodical, interpretive and analytical, socio-critical and normative, and textual dimensions.

Matthias’s current research project centres on a sociological inquiry into the operations of quality of life ideas in the health sector, notably in healthcare regulation. His analyses focus on: definitions of quality of life; measurement and valuation instruments; operationalisations of quality of life conceptions in regulatory work, especially in cost-effectiveness analysis; and connections between quality of life ideas and approaches to human suffering and death. Operations of quality of life ideas are investigated in view of their underlying knowledge base, their implicit normative commitments and value judgements, their governing bioethical principles, and their political orientations. The project addresses discussions on capitalism’s dominant modes of valuing human life and of conceptualising happiness and the good life as well as damaged and bad life, responses to human suffering, and approaches to finitude, dying, and death. The project seeks to intervene in the sociological debate on prevalent biopolitical configurations with a view to the conceptions of, and interventions in, individual and population life they entail.

  • Sociological Theory
  • Sociological Methodology
  • Cultural Theory
  • Quality of Life Debates
  • Biopolitics
  • Sociology of Health and Illness
  • Sociology of Suffering, Dying, and Death
  • Regulation Studies
Dr Ysabel Gerrard
y.gerrard@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies
My research mainly focuses on how the policies of technology and social media companies further marginalise particular social identities. Broadly speaking, my research interests fall into the following categories:
 
  • Social media content moderation
  • Digital identities (particularly gender and race)
  • Feminist media theory
  • The ethics of social media research
 
I would be particularly interested in supervising students researching one of the following topics:
 
Social media content moderation: I am interested in various aspects of the content moderation process, including: the process of writing policies, the implementation of new rules, press/public responses, and users’ reception and circumvention. I am especially interested in policies that heavily affect marginalised populations, like adult content bans and mental health-related rules.
 
Secret-telling apps: I have begun a new project about secret-telling social media apps and am interested in supervising students who also have interests in this area. 
Professor Peter Jackson
P.A.Jackson@Sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Geography

Research interests

Social and cultural geography, consumption and identity, families and food.

Food, Convenience and Sustainability

This ERA-Net project examines the contested category of 'convenience' food and its significance for public health and environmental sustainability.  It involves case studies of processed baby food, supermarket ready meals, food-box schemes and workplace (canteen) food in Sweden, the UK, Denmark and Germany.  The UK work-package is co-funded by Defra and the German Ministry of Agriculture.  The project asks: how 'convenience' food is understood by consumers and how it relates to notions of healthy eating and environmental sustainability; with what specific practices (shopping, cooking, eating, disposing) 'convenience' foods are associated; how such foods are incorporated within different household contexts and domestic routines; and to what extent current practices are subject to change (towards more sustainable and healthier practices).

Sheffield Sustainable Food Futures (SheFF)

This is a cross-Faculty inter-disciplinary initiative designed to encourage an integrated analysis to agri-food systems 'from farm to fork', ingretaing environmental and social science perspectives in pursuit of more equitable, socially just and environmentally sustainable approaches to global food security.  The work is funded from various sources including philanthropic funding from the Grantham Foundation.

Professor Paul Martin
paul.martin@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Research interests

I have two main areas of research interest. The first is the ethical, legal and social issues associated with emerging medical technologies and the second focuses on the commercialisation of biotechnology and expectation dynamics in medical innovation. My research has previously examined the development of gene therapy, genomics, pharmacogenetics, stem cells and regenerative medicine. I have advised the European Parliament, the Conseil d'Analyse Economique (part of the French Prime Minister's Office), the UK Department of Trade and Industry and the Wellcome Trust. I am a member of the Editorial advisory Boards of Sociology of Health and Illness and New Genetics and Society.

As regards my research interests in synthetic biology, I am currently a member of a BBSRC working group on synthetic biology, a co-investigator in a recently established multidisciplinary chell network and have co-authored a major review of the social and ethical issues raised by synthetic biology which was published in June 2008.

As regards my research interests in neuroscience, I am leader of a strand of research on neurosociety as part of the £1.6m Leverhulme Trust Programme Grant 'Making Science Public'.

Dr Pamela McKinney
p.mckinney@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Information School

Research interests

My research interests focus on:

  • Pedagogy for Information Literacy in Higher Education.
  • The relationship between Inquiry-based Learning and Information Literacy, including how learners can be supported in their inquiries through the development of Information Literacy capabilities and how Information Literacy can be taught using Inquiry-based pedagogies
  • Reflective practice for teachers and learners.
  • The development of teaching competencies in librarians.
  • Students working in groups and the tools and technologies groups use to communicate and collaborate.
  • Information Literacy and Information behaviour in everyday life contexts with specific groups, populations or practices.
  • Mobile health and quantified self.

Research supervision

I am interested in supervising PhD research projects in the areas of:

  • Information literacy and Information behaviour in educational or everyday life contexts
  • Technology enhanced learning in Higher Education, and particularly the choices students make about how to use social media and  mobile phones to support their learning
  • Professional development for librarians with regards to teaching
  • Mobile apps to support healthy eating
Dr Warren Pearce
warren.pearce@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Warren’s research lies at the intersection of science, policy and publics, with three main areas of research interest:

  • Climate change communication and policy
  • Public inclusion in research governance
  • The rise of randomised trials within UK public policy


Warren holds a three-year ESRC Future Research Leaders fellowship (2016-19) to investigate the implications of the social media revolution for the science and politics of climate change. He has published in a wide range of high-impact academic journals across the natural, social and health sciences such as Nature, Nature Climate Change, PLOS-ONE, Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews, Policy Sciences, BMC Trials.

He is committed to discussing and debating his research across a range of locations. He was an invited participant in the U.S. Ambassador to the U.K.’s “Digital Dialogue on Climate Change” held at Winfield House in 2015, and an invited speaker at a Royal Society event on science and society in 2015. He has been an invited speaker on climate change and social media at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Open University, University of Exeter, University of Leeds, Tyndall Centre and University of Bristol. Warren’s research regularly appears in the international media, including The Guardian, The Independent, de Volkstrant, Der Spiegel, Scientific American, Research Fortnight and Huffington Post.

Professor Alan Walker
a.c.walker@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Sociological Studies

Research interests

Alan Walker's research interests span a wide range in sociological analysis, social policy and social planning. This includes a major specialism in the social aspects of ageing, or social gerontology. With a Dutch and German colleague he invented the concept of social quality which seeks to understand and measure the quality of society (as opposed to individual quality of life). This concept has been applied empirically in Europe and the Asia-Pacific region. He also has long-term research interests in poverty and inequality and social policy in China and other East Asian countries.

Between 2005 and 2014 he directed the New Dynamics of Ageing Research Programme (http://www.newdynamics.group.shef.ac.uk/) and, before that, the Growing Older Programme (http://www.growingolder.group.shef.ac.uk/). Currently he directs two major European research projects on social innovation, active ageing and healthy life expectancy(http://www.innovage.group.shef.ac.uk/ and http://mopact.group.shef.ac.uk/).

He has a long track record of successful postgraduate supervision, with 50 PhDs awarded so far, including students from several European countries, China, Hong Kong, Japan, South Korea and Taiwan. Many of his previous doctoral students have gone on to become university professors.

As well as being an active researcher he has close links with the policy world via the National Health Service and various voluntary organisations.

Professor Keith Worden
K.Worden@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research interests

Keith's research is concerned with applications of advanced signal processing and machine learning methods to structural dynamics. The primary application is in the aerospace industry, although there has also been interaction with ground transport and offshore industries.

One of the research themes concerns non-linear systems. The research conducted here is concerned with assessing the importance of non-linear modelling within a given context and formulating appropriate methods of analysis. The analysis of non-linear systems can range from the fairly pragmatic to the extremes of mathematical complexity. The emphasis within the research group here is on the pragmatic and every attempt is made to maintain contact with engineering necessity.

Another major activity within the research group concerns structural health monitoring for aerospace systems and structures. The research is concerned with developing automated systems for inspection and diagnosis, with a view to reducing the cost-of-ownership of these high integrity structures. The methods used are largely adapted from pattern recognition and machine learning; often the algorithms make use of biological concepts e.g. neural networks, genetic algorithms and ant-colony metaphors. The experimental approaches developed range from global inspection using vibration analysis to local monitoring using ultrasound.

Dr Veronica Barnsley
v.barnsley@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of English Literature

My primary research interests are in colonial and postcolonial literatures from India and Africa, with a particular focus on alternative and global modernisms and writing interested in children, youth and development.

I am currently completing the manuscript of my first monograph, Postcolonial Children: Infancy and Development in South Asian Fiction in English. The book considers the figure of the child in fiction that deals with anti-colonial activism, Indian independence and the postcolonial state, looking at writers including Mulk Raj Anand, R.K. Narayan, Attia Hosain, Shashi Deshpande and Nadeem Aslam.

I am also beginning a new project called ‘Youth and Health in Postcolonial Literatures: India, Nigeria, South Africa’, a comparative analysis of the concept of youth that seeks to make connections between Postcolonial Studies and the growing field of Medical Humanities.

I am a founding member of The Northern Postcolonial Network, which supports knowledge exchange and networking amongst scholars working on postcolonial topics across the north of England and organisations and community groups with intersecting interests. We build sustainable relationships with groups and communities through research, public engagement and creative workshops in which we can explore issues including migration, asylum, human rights and inclusive pedagogy. Details of our past events and future activities can be found here www.northernpostcolonialnetwork.com

I am a member of The British Association of Modernist Studies, the Modernist Studies Association and the Postcolonial Studies Association.

Dr Bernard Corfe
b.m.corfe@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism
The Medical School

Research Interests

Work in my group primarily examines the relationship between diet, short-chain fatty acid production and metabolism and cell fate (apoptosis and cell cycle). Our work is across a number of scales, from molecualr cell biology of through to human intervention trials with nutrients to prevent or manage disease.

  • Butyrate and cell fate determination
  • Short-chain fatty acid metabolism
  • Crypt cell fate modelling
  • Organ level modelling
  • Diet-Microbiome Interactions, Functional analysis of Probiotics
  • Molecular Biology of keratins
  • Role of vitamin D in IBS / lower gut health
  •  
  • Medical Humanities: patient experience in IBS and IBD

Student performance

Prospective students become part of a supportive and productive research team. We aim to provide a balance between laid-backness and scientific rigourousness that allows students to develop as independent leaders with rounded skillsets. >90% of students have published research in their projects, completed their PhD / MD on time and many of gone on to successful research or academic roles.

Collaborations

We have a multidisciplinary team and collaborate effectively in order to provide wide-ranging projects of exceptional scope and vision. Collaborators include Chemical Engineers, Nutritionists, Computational Modellers, Clinical Gastroenterologists. The majority of students graduate with good interdisciplinary training and experience.

External Activity and benefits to students

Bernard Corfe is a highly networked research leader with membership of mutiple national committees in Nutrition Society, NIHR, British Society for Gastroenterology as well as rtack record of collaboration with industry. This exceptional network capital allows the optimisation of development and career opportunities for members of the team.

 

Professor Michael Cork
M.J.Cork@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease
The Medical School

Research interests

My research interests are inflammatory skin disorders including: atopic dermatitis (atopic eczema), psoriasis, alopecia areata and vitiligo. The group which includes both clinical and non-clinical staff has identified genetic variants associated with all of these diseases.

Internationally, the Academic Unit of Dermatology Research is one of the leading groups translating basic dermatological science into new treatments for the clinic. Examples include `Skin Protease Inhibitors´ and `Vitamin A Metabolic Pathway Inhibitors´. In 2001, with help from The Wellcome Trust, the group formed a `spin-out´ company called `Molecular SkinCare´, with the aim of developing these treatments.

Another major focus of the group is the effect of topical pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and oils on the structure and function of the skin barrier. Research in this area comprises investigation of the skin barrier defect associated with skin disorders such as atopic dermatitis, how skin barrier defects develop and how to treat or repair the skin barrier defect. This includes the determination of the effect of topical agents/products on the skin of volunteers visiting our clinical diagnostic `skin laboratory´, where we can measure specific properties of the skin barrier, non-invasively, using an array of specialised equipment. These results are then correlated with variants in the genes that determine the structure and function of the skin barrier.

Research conducted by the AuDR is at the interface between the clinic, academia and industry. Work has been funded by charities, including: The Wellcome Trust, British Skin Foundation and Psoriasis Association; also by the Kuwait Ministry of Health; and by pharmaceutical/cosmetics companies; including Astellas, Johnson & Johnson and Stiefel-GSK.

Dr Chun Guo
C.Guo@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Biomedical Science

Research summary

My research interests are to understand the basic cell biology and signaling pathways associated with protein post-translational modifications (PTMs, e.g., Proteolytic Cleavage, Phosphorylation, Ubiquitination and SUMOylation) in cell death, survival and repair following stress, and to translate the findings into animal models of human diseases and into treatments for human disease.

One type of PTM is SUMOylation, which involves the attachment of a small protein called Small Ubiquitin-related Modifier (SUMO) to target proteins. SUMOylation is essential for the survival of all plant and animal cells because it regulates protein-protein interactions, either promoting or hindering specific interactions according to the molecular environment. Thus the functional consequences of SUMO attachment vary greatly depending on the substrate and the cell type, and in most cases remain only poorly understood. SUMOylation can be reversed by the action of SUMO proteases to cleave the bond between proteins. This is called deSUMOylation. The largest and most characterised family of SUMO proteases is that of the sentrin-specific proteases (SENPs). Specific targets and physiological roles for SENPs are largely unknown.

In my laboratory a combination of techniques including molecular cell biology, biochemistry, genetics, pharmacology and histology is used to address the roles of protein SUMOylation and deSUMOylation in health and disease, particularly in neurodegenerative disorders such as dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The results may lead to better understanding of disease processes, more effective therapies, an enhancement to the quality of life of both patients and their carers and finally, an easing of the substantial economic burden which dementia and ALS currently impose.

  • My research group is also part of CMIAD (Centre for Membrane Interactions and Dynamics)
Dr Guillaume Hautbergue
g.hautbergue@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Neuroscience
The Medical School

I have a long-standing interest in understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling the human RNA metabolism in health and neurodegeneration. Research in my group primarily focuses on identifying gene expression alterations which cause progressive death of neurons in incurable neurodegenerative diseases and ageing in order to correct these pathophysiological changes using gene therapy approaches.

 

To this purpose, we use biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology together with various disease models which include mammalian cell lines, stable inducible cell lines, patient-derived neurons and mouse models. The main research themes currently under investigation in my laboratory are:

1.     Targeting the nuclear export of pathological C9ORF72-repeat transcripts in C9ORF72 linked amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) as well as in Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) using gene therapy programmes based on viral and non-viral approaches.

2.     Understanding the molecular mechanisms of pathological repeat-associated non-AUG (RAN) translation in C9ORF72-ALS/FTD and FXTAS in order to identify novel therapeutic targets.

3.     Identification of transcriptomes and translatomes using Next generation RNA sequencing technologies to define the mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases and how gene therapies/drugs confer neuroprotection.

4.     Structural and functional characterisation of the nuclear export of pathological microsatellite repeat transcripts in neurological disorders.

5.     Identifying the mechanisms leading to altered nucleocytoplasmic transport of proteins and cellular RNA in ageing and neurological disorders.

Dr Catarina Henriques
c.m.henriques@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism

Tissue Repair and Immunity in Ageing (TRIA)

Why we age and whether we can therapeutically prevent associated diseases has been my continued research motivation. And this is because age is the greatest risk factor for chronic diseases such as cancer, frailty, muscle atrophy, arthritis and many others. This means we are living longer than ever before, but with a heavy burden of disease which impacts on our quality of life and poses serious socio-economical challenges we must meet.
Ageing is underlined by a progressive decline in tissues ability to repair and maintain themselves. This is what is called tissue homeostasis impairment and sets the ground for age-associated diseases. A key mechanism contributing to this is telomere shortening and dysfunction. In organisms with restricted telomerase activity, which is the case of humans and zebrafish, telomeres shorten and get damaged with ageing, causing cells to die or become senescent. Senescent cells no longer divide and secrete factors that somehow impair the repair capacity of our tissues and organs, thereby contributing to disease.

Tissue homeostasis requires a tight balance between the clearance of senescent and damaged cells by the immune system and the replenishing of new cells from the stem cell niche.

My research programme focuses on understanding the interplay between immune regulation and tissue homeostasis in health and with ageing, using zebrafish as a model. My ultimate aim is to identify therapeutic targets that can be used to incentivate tissue rejuvenation and ameliorate multiple co-morbidities of ageing

Dr Lucy Jackson
lucy.jackson@shef.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield Methods Institute

Lucy’s research background is in critical social geographies though her research is applicable broadly across the social sciences including health, criminology, politics, sociology and anthropology. Lucy’s research aims to re-address questions of ‘the social’, not just in terms of social justice, but in terms of socio-spatial politics and the performative politics of everyday life within different societies. Lucy works with theories around everyday practice such as De-certeau and Lebevre.

Lucy’s research interests are in the field of feminist geopolitics and the critical geography of difference (as lived, experienced, visualised, and emotionalised through practice, performance and engagement), inclusion and exclusion, the body and the self, and identity (as negotiated, relational, complex and multiple). She is committed to research in the justice, rights and lived experience of othered groups through activist and community development projects and organisations.

Lucy’s research interests also focus upon a politics of everyday practice, an understanding of everyday publics, policies and attitudes and how this leads to the formation of different communities as well as in developing new and engaging qualitative methodological approaches. Lucy's research interest also lies in the practice and performance of everyday, banal, politics and political acts. She is predominantly recognised for her engagement with feminist countertopographical research and with innovative qualitative methods which connects emotions, experience and practice in and through scales to focus on a politics of the everyday.

For example, Lucy’s previous research has focused upon conflicting and competing rights in the city, studying the example of faith and secular groups, as well as pro-life and pro-choice protesters in the UK, working with migrant communities in the UK and South Asia to understand their everyday practices of, and commitment to, citizenship as both formal and informal category, and more recently work in East Africa around the potential for critical citizen engagement.

Dr Ciara Kelly
c.kelly@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research Interests

I have two established streams of research. Both streams aim to further our knowledge of socially responsible and sustainable practices. One focuses on individual level practices and the other focuses on organisations and industry.

At the individual level, I focus my research on building our understanding of how individuals’ roles and experiences outside of work influence their work lives, and vice versa. To do this I examine the impacts of leisure activities, idiosyncratic deals (‘i-deals’) and interpersonal emotion regulation on employees work and non-work lives. My research contributes to the literature on work-life enrichment by providing a more nuanced understanding of the roles individuals fulfil, beyond the traditional focus on family. It sheds light on broader mechanisms that facilitate individual success and productivity in the workplace. I do this through intensive longitudinal quantitative methods- often referred to as diary studies.

At the organisational and industry level, my research deals with how businesses and public bodies can positively impact wider society.

I have worked on multidisciplinary projects such as:

 

  • Comparative Police Studies in the EU (COMPOSITE), a European project examining policing processes across countries.
  • Mainstreaming Assisted Living Technology (MALT), a TSB funded project aiming to facilitate the large scale introduction of telehealth technology.
  • Active Workforce Initiative (AWI), a BOHRF funded project examining the impact of positive psychology interventions on the well-being of police and health workers.
  • Business Driven Social Change, an NBS funded review of literature on the techniques and outcomes of business driven social change.

PhD Supervision

I am interested in supervising PhD students who would like to examine issues to do with the interface between work and other life domains - this can include work-life balance, enrichment and conflict pertaining to family and leisure domains as well as the impact of supportive supervisor behaviours on work-life balance.

Dr Eva Kipnis
Eva.Kipnis@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Sheffield University Management School

Research

My research focuses on the role and impact of marketing and consumption (of goods, services, education) on intercultural relations and identity, community conflict and participation in risky health behaviours. I am a passionate believer in transformative powers of marketplace interactions. Meanings and narratives embodied in objects, images and experiences (re)produced and (re)interpreted by market actors (brands, organisations, media, consumers) can empower and legitimise both progressive and harmful practices. My ambition is to promote, facilitate and encourage marketing science and education to serve the social wellbeing and positive, harmonious interactions between consumers and organisations in the global society.
My specific research interests intersect consumer behaviour and brands/branding and comprise three strands: 1) consumers, brands and organisations in multicultural marketplaces (focus on the effects of cultural identity dynamics on consumer brand response, and multicultural branding); 2) dark side of brands and branding (focus on effects of branding on scope and reach of illicit drug markets); and 3) the role of organisations in marketplace-mediated consumer activism.

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PHD Supervicion

I welcome enquiries from prospective PhD students. Areas of PhD supervision include, but are not limited to:

  • Culture and consumer psychology
  • Experiencing multiculture in consumption environments: consumer responses and wellbeing
  • Understanding identities of multicultural consumers
  • Consumer response to multicultural advertising
  • Advertising representation of cultural minorities, including ethnoracial groups, people with disabilities etc
  • Marketplace inclusion
  • The role of consumption in multicultural learning and competences development
Dr Elspeth Whitby
e.whitby@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Oncology and Metabolism
The Medical School

Research interests

Imaging the fetus is routine during pregnancy in most countries. Ultrasound is the technique of choice as it is widely available and does not harm the fetus or mother. Despite major advances in ultrasound technology there are situations where it is necessary to know more or see more of the fetus. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is possible and during the last 20-25 years research has shown that MR is a valuable adjunct to ultrasound for fetal imaging. Over the last 12 years I have been involved in assessing the value of fetal MR in clinical practice and also developing additional sequences to image specific pathologies.
Outcome data is essential for such studies and I work closely with my clinical colleagues in neonatology, pathology and obstetrics to collect this data. This has lead to other avenues of research including imaging of the neonate with MR and imaging of the post-mortem fetus and neonate with MR in both the research and clinical settings.
Links have been established with psychology to study how the brain structure, as seen on imaging, relates to development in the term and premature infant.
Collaboration with social sciences allows us to look at the sociology of health, science and technology in fetal imaging and its impact in society.
The placenta plays an important role during the pregnancy and abnormalities of the placenta can affect the mother and the fetus. Recently, I have started to look at the placenta using MR. The majority of the work focuses on developing sequences that can determine whether the placenta has invaded into the uterine wall, if so by how much and at where. This involves a multidisciplinary team to ensure accurate follow up and outcome data.
In all areas of research I aim to translate the results into clinical practice as soon as possible and this means working very closely with clinical colleagues without whom I could not do any research.

Dr Po Yang
po.yang@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Computer Science

Dr Po Yang is a Senior Lecturer in Large Scale Data Fusion in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Sheffield. He graduated with a BSc (Hons) in Computer Science from Wuhan University in China in 2004, before being awarded his MSc in Computer Science from the University of Bristol in 2006. In 2010 he graduated with a PhD in Electronic Engineering from the University of Staffordshire. From February 2015 to July 2019, he was a Senior Lecturer in Computer Science at Liverpool John Moores University. He worked as a Post-doc Research Fellow in Computer Science at the University of Bedfordshire from January 2012 to January 2015. Previously, he has also held the positions of Research Associate in Computer Science at the University of Teeside from September 2008 to February 2010, a Research Assistant in image processing at the University of Salford from March 2010 to December 2011. Since 2006 he has generated over 90 international journal and conference papers in the fields of Pervasive Healthcare, Image Processing, Parallel Computing and RFID related internet of things (IoT) applications.

He serves as an Associate Editor in IEEE Journal of Translational Engineering in Health and Medicine and IEEE Access.

He has over 12 years full time research experience in computing areas (recent three years working on Pervasive Healthcare), which includes the key participation and local leadership of 6 EU funded projects CALLAS (RA in Affective Computing at Teeside University), IMPACT (RA in Image Processing at Salford University), GPSME, DRINVENTOR, MHA and CHIC (RF in Computer Science at Bedfordshire University) and 3 EPSRC/TSB funded projects.

Dr Po Yang's research interests include: Pervasive Computing, Healthcare Informatics, Data Analytics and Internet of Things (IoT)

Professor Beining Chen
b.chen@sheffield.ac.uk
Personal Webpage

Department of Chemistry

Research Interests

The major focus of our research is to use computer aided molecular design and combinatorial chemistry to facilitate drug design and molecular recognition studies.

A. Therapeutics

TSEs, are progressive, invariably fatal neurological disorders occurring in sheep, cattle and humans, and in a variety of other ungulates, felines and rodents. The disease involves the formation of pathological deposits of protein in the brain. The protein responsible, the non-infectious cellular isoform of prion protein (PrPC), can adopt an aberrant insoluble infectious conformation (PrPRes), which accumulates extracellularly and is resistant to denaturation and digestion with protease. Aggregation of PrPRes leads to neural disorder and thereafter the death of animals and humans affected. The development of therapeutic compounds has always been considered as one of the most important and challenge areas to be tackled in TSE research. The project aims to develop drugs which interacts with the biosynthetic pathway of prion protein either to stabilise its conformation or to provoke the interaction of the protein with its abnormal counterpart.

Our main focus now is to develop novel drugs for prion disease to cure Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs) including Scrapie in Sheep, BSE in cattles and CJD in humans. Novel ideas together with well written proposal have recently secured her group major funding from the Department of Health worth over £1.15 million. We are also building up our research in natural product chemistry/bioorganic chemistry for lead discovery. Activities in therapeutics are expanding into other amyloid diseases as well as areas cardiovascular, CNS, anti-viruses.

B. Proteomics - Structural Studies of Abnormal Prion Proteins

With very few exceptions, all cells in the human body contain the same genes. We need to know what proteins are produced and are active in different cells and at different times, because it is the proteins that make things happen. For example, they govern how cells communicate with each other to mobilise an immune response, or to detect and respond to changes in their environment. The genome is a parts list and the proteome (the complement of proteins) is an activity report. Proteomics is about understanding the function of proteins, both individually and collectively.

The most challenging area in the study of TSE is to understand how abnormal prion protein forms, and its structure and functions. Modern available technologies such as x-ray crystallography and NMR prove to be little use in studying the abnormal prion conformation due to the special insoluble properties of the plaque formed during protein aggregation. Theoretical modelling using molecular dynamics and bioinformatics as tools together with various labelling techniques are being developed in Dr. Chen's group for the prediction of abnormal prion structures.